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November 26, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUE~SDAY,

EXTENSION COURE ORK
BEGUN BY UNIERSITY
PROFESSOES START HOLDING
CLASSES AFTER LONG ELAY
CAUSED BY FLU
The organization of the extension
courses given by the University in this
part of the state was resumed last
week after a delay on account of the
epidemic. In many of the courses
which were to be given fortnightly
there will be weekly classes and lec-
tures held until they make up for
the time lost.
Several Classes Held
The following professors organized
and gave their first lectures ih their
courses: Prof . T. E. Rankin began
his course on the Short Story and
One-Act Play in Saginaw on Satur-
day. His class will meet every week.
Prot. R. M. Wenley organized his
class in "After the War Problems"
in Flint on Friday. He will lecture
there fortnightly.
Prof. S. F. Gingerich was in Jack-
son Saturday to deliever his first lec-
ture on Tennyson, and will continue
to do so every week.
Others Start This Week
The following professors have, or-
ganized their sections and will next
meet with them this week: Prof. C.
H. Van Tyne at Highland Park, Nov.
28, on "Causes of the Great War."
Prof. W. R. Hunphreys in Detroit,
Nov. 30, on the study of the English
Bible. Prof. R. M. Wenley in De-
troit, Nov 30, on "After the War Prob-
lems." Prof. A. E. Wood in Detroit,
Nov 29, on Sociology 28.
ALL U. S. TROOPS
TO LEAVE ENGLAND
(Continued from Page One)
day and the Orcha sailed on Satur-
day.
This announcement means that the
movement of the American troops
now in England, the majority of which
are in air service detachments, will
continue steadily until all of them,
some 20,000, have returned to this
country. There are no regiments or
other units of line troops in Great
Britain. The first movement of the
larger units, such as brigades and
divisions, will come from French
ports, it is assumed, as the British
cross-channel service undoubtedly is
completely occupied with the trans-
portation of returning British forces.
Transportation Is Question
Before General March's announce-
ment, Secretary Baker discussed with
newspaper correspondents the return
bf the Yanks from France. Their
homeward movement, he said, depends
almost entirely upon the transporta-
tion facilities both at sea and in
France.
Besides employing in this work the
German liners seized in this country,
Dutch vessels in this country, and all
available transports, Mr. Baker said
that .some of the British transport
tonnage employed in carrying troops;
to France, will continue to be used. in
getting the men home. He pointed
out, however, that Great Britain will
need many of her ships to carry home
Canadian, Australian, New Zealand,
and other colonial forces which have
been in France longer than the Am-
erican armies.
May Use German Liners
German liners now in German portsI

Mr. Baker said, may offer a means of
expediting the return of the Amer-
ican forces. Present plans are to use
these vessels to carry food to Ger-"
many, and the secretary said that it
might be found possible to make some
arrangements under which some of
General Pershing's men could be sent
home on them.
With the removal of the submarine
menace, Mr. Baker said, It will be pos-
sible to bring home some soldiers in
cargo vessels. The shipping board is
commissioning many such vessels
from day to day, and they will be add-
ed to the fleet available for the re-
turn of the army.
For the next several weeks Mr. Bak-
er expects returning transports to be
laden entirely with sick and wounded
men and those not immediately avail-
able for military service.
DANCES TO BE HELD AT UNION
ON WEDNESDAY AND THURSnAY
The Michigan Union will give two
dances this week. One will be given
Wednesday night and the other
Thursday afternoon. Tickets for the
dance Wednesday night will go on
sale Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock'
and those for the Thursday afternoon
dance at noon Wednesday. Tickets
may be had at the desk in the new
Union. Committees will be announced

Galens Initiates
12 Junior PediCs
Galens, honorary upperclass med-
ical society, held its annual fall init-
iation and banquet on Monday night
at the Phi Rho Sigma house. Dr.
Mark Marshall presided at the ban-
quet as toastmaster. The following
juniors were initiated: T. W. Adams,
S. W. Becker, D. S. Corpron, Ward
W. Harryman, Paul M. Ireland, J. A.
Kervin, D. F. Kudner, S. A. McCutch-
eon, George F. Moore, Hugh R. Moore,
Harold W. Smith, and W. D. Stinson.
ENGLAND PREPARES
WILSON RECEPTION
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 2.-Delay in the
announcement of the names of the
American commissioners t the peae
conference at Versailles Is under-
stood to be attributable to two caus-
es: first, that no decision has been
reached as to the number, and sec-
ond, that all of the persons whom
the President has in mind for places
have not yet had an opportunity to
signify their acceptance. It is re-
garded asdesirable that the number
of American commissioners corre-
spond to the number named by each
of the great Entente powers. Corre-
spondence by cable now is going on
between Washington and the Entente
capitals with thp purpose of coming
to a common understanding on this
'point.
The belief obtains in some quar-
,ters here that the size of the delega-
tions should be very much restrict-
ed. 'A minimum as low as three has
been considered and five seems to
meet with some approval.
Ambassador J. J. Jusserand, of
France, and Mrs. Jusserand, will a-
company President Wilson to France.
The ambassador has not had a vaea-
tion since he same to Amerie at the
outbreak of the European war, and he
goes to join in his people's celebra-
tion over victory and probably to play
a part in the peace conference.
From preparations being made in
England for his reception, it is gen-
erally believed that President Wilson
will go to that country to stay sev-
eral dys before continuing to Paris.
It is known that several representa-
tives of the governmenthavepreceded
him to England to arrange for is
stay there.
U. W. W. OBTAINS
MORE THAN QUOTA
(By Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 25.-Total subscrip-
tions to the United War Work cam-
paign were $203,179,038, or $32,679,-
'038 in excess of the amount originally
asked by the several war relief or-
'ganizations for their work during
reorganization in the army and navy,
according to official announcement to-
night by the national campaign com-
mittee. This is the largest sum ever
raised as an outright gift in the his-
tory of the world.
According to the committee every
state in the Union, with the exception
of Pennsylvania and Minnesota, ex-
ceeded the quota assigned it, and con-
fidence was expressed that these
states will be over the top when the
final returns are ii.
SECTION B ATTENDS LECTURE
AT NEWBERRY HALL Y. X. C. A.

(Continued from Page One)
a League of Free Nations. That will
be hardest to do, and is far from be-
ing done. There are voices speak-
ing against it, but we are committed
to it by the words we have put be-
fore the world for these past mouths,
by the deaths that have been died
in our cause, by the needs of hu-
manfty.
"Itwill be done on America's part
only by a people whose thinking is
clear and whose purposes are true.
Whether a man does his part across
the sea or here, it is all one. We are
all ready for another war if the same
need should arise, but we are com-
mitted to solemn effort to see that it
does not arise. We are afraid of
nothing but dishonor, and we will
take our part with all the force need-
ed to prevent war by seeing to it
that a nation cannot again so threat-
en the peace of the world."
University of Nebraska has a new
"women's hall." Its function on the
campus will bear the same relation to
the unnversity women there that the
Michigan Union here bears to our
men.
Another French student girl has
been sent to the University of Indiana

Now, that the war
is over- - DressUp
Great days are here. Mleet the new oppor-
txnities of peace half-lvay,1DJress Up!
now confidently buy and enjoy nel clothes.
r...- .t....,,f st ss tha ttha time fort

..

it is a peasant concsanr tau.; ausu n;
Iwhich many men habe been laiting to replen-
ish heirtlvadroe jias u wui uz

',i
.5
S
4

ish hei Uprdrbe ind usI h the pnesr
stocks of
Kuppenheimer Clothes
on hand in the history of this store. But this
is no time to be ivasteful, but rather a time to
conserve more than eker before by buying
quality,
Our balues in suits and obercoats represent
the lowest prices at )vhich high quality can be
sold.
$25, $30, $35, $40, $45-
0NF, ALLEN CO.
r"The ppabdmsr alsva ii Ann Arbor"
MAIN STREET

r

i

3

ARROW
WASHED
HANDKER-
CHIEFS
Clean r Soft > Ready for
Use in Sanitary Packages
WHITE OR kHAXJ
CLUETT.PEABODY&I CO..I.,Troy,N.Y.
Ray's "BETSY ROSS" Shop
Te Fountaila Room DeLue
Net Fadge Sudass Whipped Creaw Sodas
Met Checstts Supreme Maited iks
We Cater To TheeWhe Delad The lest
o. oIlstels Ariede
- ©TICVR
Members of the Athena Lit-
erary society will meet at 7:16
o'clock tonight in the matron
room in University hall. The
meeting is important.
The Stylus meeting that was
to be' held tonight is postponed
until further notice.
FOR LIBERTY
The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: killed in action, 512; died of
wounds, 162; died of accident and oth-
er causes, 9; died of disease, 129;
wounded severely, 74; wounded de-
gree undetermined, 146; wounded
slightly, 112; missing in action, 209.
Total, 1614.
The following casualties were re-
ported yesterday by the commanding
general of the American Expedition-
ary Forces: Killed in action, 336;
died of wounds, 60; died of accidents
and other causes, 13; died of disease,
212; wounded severely, 50; wounded,
degree undetermined, 216; wounded
slightly, 106; missing in action, 62;
prisoners. 14. Total. 1.109,.

df o

A Magnificent Assemblage of

NEWEST

FUR

MODES

Today and Tomorrow Only

During
H. Mliller
facturer's
display in

these tivo days, Wm.
& Co's. entire manu-
line of furs will be on
our second floor salons

Me collection embraces the
most beautiful array of fur pieces,
coats, collars, shawls, muffs and
throws possible to imagine. All
show the distinctive touch of style
authority acquired only through

long years of experience in their
making.
The selection ,of fur coats is
particularly noteworthy. Hudson
seal,, raccoon, muskrat, xutria'-
all are represented, many trimmed
in contrasting fur.
College women _are particularly
invited to be present during this
display.

Ia

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