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November 24, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i 1 1L.j £V5ll.v£ 11\.W'1J.'t JH1A. I ,

E SOON

ued from Page One)
e sent, making it a slow
ssemble the data.
00 Yanks Captured
er of Americans taken
the Germans, little more
s strikingly low in view
Marsh's announcement
"in 'round numbers," of
ans have been captured
icans. The fact that the
mies had been moving
tinuously since they en-
ttle doubtless accounted
'ence.
missing probably will
s who have been captur-
whose bodies probably
e found, and others who
come lost in the ranks of
or British forces. The
also covers the unident-
ways to be expected when
of troops are engaged
arsh said no report on
ion of the army of occu-*
Ben received, but that the
Ignated by General Per-
among those he could
iately. The order in
ill return has not been
but 'the chief of staff has
that it will take consid-
to bring that number of
He also gave assurances
.department had no in-
lowing the veterans of
Belgium to "sneak into
tnnoticed," but that time-
nent would be made so'
e receptions could' be
Issues Statement
3aker supplemented Gen-
outline of demobilization
by stating that General
.reducing his army to a
0 divisions, and would
e it as conditions justify
erage strength of 40,000
sion, which would cover
r auxiliary forces, this
that General Pershing
1,200,000 in France, from
tual army of occupation
'yes would be organized
gainst any possible em-
rsh showed that-virtual-
supplemental army corps
ank corps units in addi-
already had authorized
hing to send back rail-
r, army artillery, gas
ank corps units in addi-
divisional organizations.
divisions designated by
hing are replacement
have been skeletonized
recruit divisions in the

F F G .. lVD. 5' A" 11V
TheseatU. ofI.
Dear Phoebe:-
Here at the U. of Minnesota we all
have to have military passes to get
into the "U." and they've got a whole
lot of M.P.'s scattered all over the'
campus. It's a beautiful scheme, but
when you're tearing wildly acros
campus to get to the fourth floor- of
your class in half a minute and an
M. P. (whom you've known all through
high school) blandly, stops you and
demands your pass, and you have to
hunt through about six books and'
note book for it, and then he treats
it like a German-Belgium treaty of
neutrality, oh, how you do hate the
kaiser!-
Yours,
THEOPHILUS>\
HOOVER SHIP$ FOOD
TO FREED NATIONS.
Washington.-Ships carrying 200,-
000 tons of food for the populations of
northern France, Belgium, and Aus-
tria now are en route to Europe.
They are proceeding under sealed or-
ders to Gibraltar and Bristol channel
ports and on arrival will await word
from Hoover for final distribution.
Those going to Gibraltar are expept-
ed to go to Asiatic ports, Mediterra-
nean and the other to French and
Belgium ports.
Neither the number of the ships
envolved in the present movement
nor the proportion to Gibraltar or the
near east could be learned from the
food administration.
It was stated that the final" ar-
rangements for feeding the people
freed from German militarism is
awaiting the arrival of Mr. Hoover
in Europe and the result of his sur-
vey of the situations there.-
The ships underway were under-
stood to be the first to leave Ameri-
can ports for countries other than
northern France and Belgium. It was
said that 200,000 tons of food month-
ly would be required to relieve the
situation in Europe.-
WORK FOR MANY MONTHS TO
COME FACES SHIP PLANTS

ARMY BOYS SHOW UP
WELL AT FERRY FIELD
BLUE DEVIL BAND ENTERTAINS
CROWD BETWEEN THE
HALVES
The French Army band arrived yes-
terday on a special train from Lansing
at about 1:30 oclock and were met
at the depot by detachments from the
S. A. T. C. and naval unit. The units
were lined up on Fuller street. with
their bands when the train pulled in.
After the Frenchmen had placed
their baggage in an army truck they
formed in line and headed by the
Michigan boys marched up State street
and, directly down to Ferry field.,
Army and Navy Maneuvre
The S. A. T. C. and naval unit came
into the fild first, followed by the
Frenchmen,and took positions in bat-
talion formation alongside the South
stand. The army and navy bands
after some maneuvring took their'
places beside the flag pole at the
North side of the field, and the French-
men marched up to the pole on the
opposite side. As, the French flag
was at the north flag pole the com-
bin d army and 'navy bands played'
the "Marseilles" with the men on the
ficod standing at present arms and all
the spectators uncovered and stood
up. When this was ended the French
band rendered 'the "Star Spangled
Banner" with the same ceremony, as
the American flag was run up on the
other pole.
French Band Is Well Liked
After this flag raising, the S. A. T.
C. and the naval unit fell in behind
their bands and marched up and down
the field in company front. They left
the field in line of march and after
forming outside again were dismiss-
ed to take their places in the stands
at random.
The French band made a most fav-
orable impression with their snappy
uniforms and fine music. Between
the halves they entertained the cr'owd
by playing one of our own songs-
"The Victors"-and, it must be said,
in much better style than the Michi-
gan boys themsel-ves.
MANY UNITS ARE RETURNING*
TO UNITED STATES SOON
Washington, Nov. 23.-If your boy
belongs to one of the following mil-
tary units he will soon be home, as
these units now abroad, have been

There will be an important
meeting of Round-Up club at 10
o'clock this morning in the
Union.
A special meeting of Cer-
cle Francais will be held at 4:30
o'clock Monday afternoon in the
Cercle Francais rooms in the
south wing of University hall.
An Oen Forum'for the S. A.
T. C. and non-S. A. T. C. men
will be held this morning (Sun-
day) at 9:30 o'clock .in the
Methodist church. Professor
Wood will be present.
Open house at the Methodist
church this afternoon at 3:30
o'clock. Victrola concert and
ilight refreshments.
Mrs. Gordon Avery will be the
leader of the Young People's
meeting at 4:30- o'clock at the
Methodist church. Students and
friends are welcome.
PACKARD. PUTS OUT 5,000TH
LIBERTY MOTOR FRIDAY
Friday proved 'a memorial day for
the Packard company, for it was then
that the 5,000th Liberty motor-truck
was shipped. In 1917, Thanksgiving,
the first Liberty motor, wrapped in an
American flag, was sent to the Amer-
ican Aircraft Forces. Up to date.the
Packard plant has built more Liberty
motors than any other manufac-
turer..
When the government accepted the
Packard motor it had a horse-power
of 367, now it has raised to 450, due
to the rapid develpoment of tools and
designs. At present an order for
6,000 Liberty motors is rapidly being
completed, in order to help carry on
the work still going on abroad

ILLINOIS ELEVEN CLAIMS
"BIG TEN" CHAMPIONSHIP
Chicago, Nov. 23. - Illinois won her
fourth Conference football game here
this afternoon when she defeated the
University pf Chicago Maroons, by a
score of 29 to 0. Illinois tonight
claimed the "Big Ten" champion-
ship.
Illinois started scging in the first
period, Kirkpatrick kicking a goal
from placement from the 28 yard line.
He missed another attempt by inch-
es. The Chicago punting was weak
and the wings ineffective.
You will .'tways find satin action v
.d~eritsing in the Daily.-Adv.

State

UTToro
& Monroe

Mrs.

Special Sunday Dinner 50c
Nov. 24, 1918
12:30-2:O
Cream of Tomato Soup

W'

Celery
Roast
(Mashed P
Ice Crea
Coffee''

Cranberry Sauce
Veal kith Dressing
Chicken Pie
'otatoes Green Peas
m and Nagle Sundae
Vlince Pie
Cocoa Tea JNilk
roubics

y

..a 91

./

;
,
:,
r
:

T1 ar is Von
and Anxieties a Thing
Past. Celebrate

of ti

Ca. '
Ty,
, r .

CHRISTMAS,

this year as never before. Give
with an open heart and agener-
ous purse.

u Jeelry
for Christmas

4 1
x l
f ,I
ii
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f
t
{

Beautiful and lasting- a constant source
of pleasure--a joyous reminder of the
Victory Christmas.
JEWELERS
OODWARD AVENUE AT GRAND RIVER
DETROIT.

+^L LL

a,

_..-

LIIXKILJU
ml

~ J

I

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GO TO

The Mayer-Schairer

Do you want that Box of Candy for her
Thanksgiving Gfl?
Then write your toast to Michigan and

1--

Detroit. - Michigan's shipbuilding
plants, which have been doing their
share to supply the United. States
with shipping tonnage badly needed
because of the war, have sufficient
work ahead, it is said, to keep them
busy for many months. There are
plants at Detroit, Saginaw and other
points about the great lakes and all
are veritable hives of industry, de-
spite the signing of the armistice pact.
Vice-President. Henry G. White of
the 'Great Lakes Engineering Works
here declares there ,are now under
construction in the United States 724
ships, with a deadweight tonnage of.
3,500,000. These are to be concrete,
steel and wooden vessels..

Company
112 S. Main St.

ordered to demobilize.

rons 156, 167,
225, 226, 228,
262, 263, 265,
308, 309, 310,
319, 320, 321,
t33, 334, 335,
356, 361, 371,
832, 833, 834,
852, 812, 906,
470, 471, 472,

187,
254,
267,
314,
325,
336,
377,
836,-
1107,
473,

188,,
256,
268,
315,
329,
337,
378,
837,
177,
475,

Aero -squad-
211, 216, 219,
259, 260, 261,
282, 306, 307,
316, 317, 318,
330, 331, 332,
338, 340, 350,
823, 824, 831,
838, 839, 868,
210, 220, 234,
476, 478, 479,

Nail It today!

FOR

SE CANVASS
MEN IN SERVICE

ing.-With the announcement
Pays ago that a house to house
or canvass is to be made in
y for names of Lansing's sold-
the world war, reports re-
ome that similar action is to,
en at many other points in'
,n. Complete records are to
e. It is hoped that the plan
made statewide.'
3 other way than a house to
anvass, it is believed, can an
s list of the state's soldiers
ined. It is proposed to give
;inal copies of the lists to the
r preservation in the archives
commonwealth.
and recruiting boards are
complete lists because of the
imber of men who enlisted at
break pf the war or prior to
y into the conflict of the Unit-
;es. Thousands of Michigan
ere. serving in the National
md regular army and thous-
ore enlisted in Canadian, Brit-
French or Polish units.
raphers Get Wage Increase
ington. - Railroad telegraph-
ges were advanced by order,
ctor General McAdoo, at 13
er hour above the rate. pre-
last Jan. 1, with a minimum
ents per hour, retroactive to
Eight hours, hereafter is to
idered a day's work and over
11 be paid at the rate of tine
f. The order involves' an ag-
increase of about $30,000,000
and applies to between 60,000
00 employes.
adgers Win Game 14.3
bus, O., Nov. 23.-Ohio 'State,
n that meets Michigan here
turday, was defeated here to-
Wisconsin, 14 to 3.
nsin at, the start of the fourth
an 80 yards for a touchdown

Music Aid to Shell Schock Cases
London.-Music has been found to
be beneficial in the treatment of sold-
iers suffering from shell-shock and
now singing is to be tried on a sys-
tematic scale with the approval of
the Army authorities.
It has been found that singing has
both directly and indirectly a won-
derful curatve effecit, and there are
a number of cases on record in which
a man who has been unab e to speak,
suddenly joined in with the singing
and so recovered his speech. An ef-
fort is being made to organize reg-
ular singing training in all hospitals
where there are shell-shock cases.
hides from Draft in Hollow Tree
Indianapolis. - Tired of working
and desiring to "camp out" where he
said he would not be molested by offi-
cers intent of enforcing the work or
fight order, a man giving the name of
Edward Hatfield was found living
in a hollow tree near this city. He
had lived in the tree three weeks,
subsisting on corn from a nearby
field. His registration card showed
he was in Class one of tile draft. He
was sent to a hospital.
Services at Lutheran Church
The subject for the morning's ser-
mon at the Zion Lutheranchurch,
corner WKashington street and Fifth
avenue, will be "Hearing the Voice
of God." Students are cordially in-
vited to this service. E. C. Stellhorn,
pastor, will use as his text, John 5,
19-29, and will preach in the Eng-
lish language. Sunday school meets
at 9 o'clock.
Always-Daily service-Always.

92, 140, 349; number one sailmakers'
draft; Aircraft acceptance parks 1
and 2; Number 1 Handley-Paige
training depot station; Photographic
sections numbers 69, 70, 71, 72; Cer-
tain radio detachments; Divisions 31,
34, 38, 39,-76, 84, 86, 87; Coast artil-
lery regiments 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 73,
74, 75; Field artillery brigades 65 and
'163; Construction companies 3, 4, 5,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17, 18, 19.
German Ambassadors Lew:ve Spain
Madrid, Nov. 23.-The German and
Austro-Hungarian ambassadors here
have ceased to represent their respec-
tive countries, according to the news-
papers.

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
,Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks

i

I

P4OPULA'

BUSY BEE

I

Chairs

You may be a poet
A nd don't know it

Book Cases

e

ra

ON
r1

r

0.

LOUISE HINCKLEY

215 E. LIBERTY ST.

I.

11 n

f A. }

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wmm

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