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November 24, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-24

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IR n
FAIR

WEATHERI
AND SLIGHTLY
WARNER

Siri4 an

~atl

ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
DAY 1ND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

1

I_______________________________ __________________________

VOL. XXIX. No. 47. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1918 PRICE THREE CE

GENERAL PERSHING
TO SEND YANKEES
HOMEWARD SOON
CHIEF-OF-STAFFP MENTONS N0
MICHIGAN TROOPS IN
LI$TS
MARSH PLACES TOTAL
CASUALITIES AT 236,117
Secretary Baker Claims U. S.General
Plans to Keep 1,290,00 Yanks
For Construction Work
(By Associated Press)
London, Nov. 22.-12:30 p. m.
(deayed).-Ten thousand Ameri-
can soldiers from all parts of the
United States left Liverpool for
Aneria today. All troops in
England will be sent back as rap-
Idly as possible.
°--r
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 23.-Demobiliza-
tion of the American Expeditionary
Forces, already in progress with the.
movement homeward of sick and
wounded, will be hastened by the re-
turn at an early date of eight divis-
ions of national guard and national
army troops, eight regiments of coast
artillery, and two brigades of field
artilleryd. This announcement was
made today by General Marsh, chief-
of-staff, on receipt of dispatches from
General Pershing.
Total hostilities to Nov. 11, when the
war ended, were 236,117. This in-
cludes, General Marsh said, killed
and died of wounds, died of disease,
unclassified deaths, wounded, prison-
ers and missiiig.
The divisions, which General Marsh
said have been designated by General
Pershing to return as soon as the
sick and wounded have been moved to
the United States, are:
Marsh Issues List
National guard: 31st (Georgia, Ala-
bama, and Florida); 34th (Nebraska,
Iowa, South Dakota, and Minnessota).
38th (Indiana, Kentucky, and Virgin-
ia), and 39th (Arkansas, Mississippi,
and Louisana)
National army: 76th (New Eng-
land); 84th (Kentucky, Indiana, and
southern Illinois); 86th (Northern Ill-
inois, including Chicago), and 87th
(Arkansas, Lousiana, Mississippi and
southern Alabama).
The coast artillery regiments to be
-returned as soon as possible were an-
nounced as the 46th, 47th, 48th, 49th,
50th, 73rd, 74th, and 75th.
Proposes. Sending 2 Artillery Brigades
The two field artillery brigades to
be brought home are the 65th and the
163rd. Eighty-two aero squadrons, 17
.construction companies, and several
special units from England will be
brought home as soon as transporta-
tion facilities are available, General
Marsh said.
Casualties sustained by the Amer-
icans were tabulated by General
Marsh as follows:
Killed and died of wounds, 36,154.
Died of disease, 14,811.
Deaths, unclassified, 2,204.
Wounded, 109,625. -
Prisoners, 2,163.
1iissng, 1,160.
Total, 236,117.
Total Number Smaller Than Expected
While the total losses suffered by
the American army in France at first

glance appeared *to be almost double
the total estimated by officers here as
probable, analysis of the table it was
pointed out, shows that among the
179,000 wounded are included the
names of thousands of men whose in-
juries were so trival that they never
were admitted to hospitals and the
record of their injury was kept only
in company and regimental dressing
stations. The final total killed, died
of wounds, or of disuse, or in the un-
classified death list, or the serious1y
wounded, the prisoners, and missing,
officers believe, will work out not in
excess of 125,000.
The official figures sblow also nearly
double the number of deaths from dis-
ease that has been made public to
date. No explanation has been for-
warded by General Pershing, but it is
assumed that the unexpected increase
is due to the wide distribution of Am-
erican and Allied hospitals to which

I

MICHIGAN DEFEATS ONLY STATE RIVAL
BY 21 TO 6 I C.TO RYOGDETZRUNS2
YARDS FOR SCORE ON AGGIE FUM

THE TEAM THAT DEEATED M. A. C.

LARGE CROWD APPOVE
Of BLUE IEYIL CONCERT

FRENCH BAND MAKES
SHOWING AT HILL
AUDITORIUf

GOOD

The French Army band, known
as the Blue Devils, gave a concert
last night at Hill auditorium that was
a great delight to the audience, which
was in the spirit of the music and
applauded vociferously. They first
played the "Star Spangled Banner"
and then the "Marseillaise" in a way
that only a French band can play it.
The program' was a mixture of oper-
atic selections and martial music.
The soloists, M. Debruille on the vio-
ulin, M. Georges Frue on the piano,
M. Leguin on the cornet, and M. Ban-
ruin o the flute, were given oppor-
tunity to show their special talent,
and the audience manifested its appre-
ciation by forcing each to encore
many times. The tenseness of the au-
dience was manifest throughout the
program, and the general attitude
seemed to be that this was a rare
treat. At the end, the band played
"Over There" with a zest that would
be a credit to any Yankee band, and
seemed to enjoy- it as mu'ch as the
audience.2 t
This band made a tour of 42 cities
in three weeks and helped raise $72,-
000 worth of Liberty bonds. "More
than musicians, they bring messages
of love and affection from our sister
republic, and are under the leader-
ship of the greatest band master of
Europe. He is regarded in the same
light as John Philip Sousa in Ameri-
ca. Traveling 10,000 miles in six
months, they bring us the heart of
France and the martial spirit of that
great people."
Yank-Hun Troops
Rest On Jttoselle
(By Assoiated Press)
With the American army of occu-
pation, Nov. 23.-General Pershing's
forces in Luxemberg, and all along
the river Moselle, from the points of
junction with the French, on their
right and left, looked over into Ger-
many today.
The Germans were somewhat slow-
er in some places in evacuating their
territory than had been expected, but
not enough to give rise to the belief
that they do not intend to observe
the terms of the armistice.
Along the Moselle river, lagging
German soldiers washed their cloth-
ing today on their side of the river.
The Americans on the opposite bank
did likewise. There was little con-
versing across the river owing to the
strict American order against frater-
nizing.
Major-General Lassiter succeeds
Major-General Haan, of the 2nd divi-
sion. General Haan now is com-
manding the 7th corps.
Nov. 30 Last Day for Xmas Packages
Washington.-November 30 is the
day set for the mailing of Christmas
packages to the boys in France, with-
out an export license. The former
date was November 20, but due to an
extension of time, Americans may
still send their gifts to the boys

D R A I N GERMANY'S
POCKETBOOK-CRANE
That the only way to penalize Ger-
many as a nation is to land on her
pocketbook, is the opinon of Professor
Crane. The penalty may be bare
compensation, or embrace in addi-
tion, punitive damages, or indemni-
ties. So. far, the Allies seem to have
in mind only compensation, whih
will amount to as vast a sum as the
Cenral Powers can possibly pay.
"Germany is liable for all the dam-
age done in France and Belgium by
the war," said Professor Crane. "Much
of the damage was done by the En-
tente. That is a matter of no impor-
tance. The loss must fall somewhere.
It is the practice of nations to let
it fall on the loser. When the loser
is also the aggressor, there is added
justice to this practice.
Individuals Must Be Punished
"But our experience with corpora-
tions has shown us that colletive
penalties alone are inefficient.- Agents
for corporate bodies must be punish-
ed individually. On the individuals
we can inflict corporal punishment,
just as after the Civil war the United
States authorities executed the keep-
er of the notorious Andersonville
prison.
This action is entirely within inter-
national law and should be applied to
individual Germans, as, for instance,
to the German judge who condemned
Captain Fryatt to death without a fair
trial as consequence of orders receiv-
ed from superiors. It was simply a
case of murder."
PAROLE SYSTEM WORKS WELL
IN MICHIGAN STATE PRISON
(Correspondence of Associated Press)
Lansing.-The paroling of prison-
ers from Michigan institutions has
worked out to the keen satisfaction
of the state authorities, including the
board of parole and pardons, for three
of every four paroled men have made
good, it is declared.
The annual report of the board,.
which has been submitted to Govern-
or Sleeper, says 974 paroles were
granted during 1917 from a total of
2,462 cases considered and during the
year but 234 men violated their pa-
roles. The violations were mostly
technical, in a majority of the cases
the men failing to report regularly,
as required, to their "next friends."
There were 899 instances in which
paroles were -refused and in 32 cases
executive clemency was recommended
to the governor. During the year 91
paroled prisoners were returned to
prisons.
All expenses, including taveling, of
the pardon board during 1917, totalled
$7,473.18.
Detroit Minister to Preach Here
At 10:30 Rev. S. S. Clark of Detroit
will preach. The Reverend Mr. Wells,
pastor of this church, will conduct
the service the first Sunday in De-
cember. He is on leave as an army
*chaplain at the present time.

CAPTAIN PUTT DISAPPROVES
FOOD SERVED AT
UNION

CHANGE TO BE MADE
I N IN. A. T. C. FOOD

OFI

There will be radical changes made
in the food which the S. A. T. C. men
eat, according to Capt. G. W. Putt.
There have been many complaints
made about this food and it has not
met with great favor with the boys
who have to eat it. This will all be
changed soon. Each officer will sub-
mit a menu to Captain Putt and he,:
together with the Union food commit-
tee, will pick. the best menu of the
lot. This will be used hereafter, if
It does not make the cost of the food
exceed the government ration allow-
ance . The menus will include food
for every day in the week and the
same kind of, food will be -served
once a week. The boys will have pie
and ice cream once or twice each
week and will have many good steaks{
and good cuts of meat.
"I inspected the food and the condi-
tions at the Union the other day,"
said Captain Putt, "and the food really
was not fit for a soldier to eat. The
mess hall was dirty and I am go-
ing to have it cleaned up."
Cost of War to Date 175 Billion
Washington.-The direct cost of the
war for all belligerent nations to last
May 1 was reported at about $175,000,-
000,000 by the federal reserve bulle-
tin. It is estimated that the cost will
*amount to nearly $200,000,000,000 be-
fore the end of .this year.
For purely military and naval pur-
poses it is figured that all belligerents
had sent $132,00,000,000 to May 1, or
about three-fourths of the total war
cost. The balance represented inter-
est on debt and other indirect war ex-
penses.
McAdoo Reduces Fare .to Two Cents
Washington, Nov. 23. - Director
General McAdoo has announced that
he planned to reduce the passenger
rate to two -cents a mile instead of
three cents for soldiers discharged
from the army. By law the soldiers
are allowed three and one-half cents,
a -mile for transportation and meals
and the special fare will enable them,
Mr. McAdoo believes, to buymeals
and pay for sleeping car reservations
out of it.
Treasury Announces Final Figures
Washington, Nov. 23.-Total sub-
scriptions to the Fourth Liberty Loan
were $6,989,047, 000, the treasury de-
partment announced after final tabu-
lations had been completed. The
oversubscriptions, $989,047,000 was
16.48 per cent over. Every federal
reserve district exceeded its allotted
quota.

Good Old Times
1ack For Game
Those sweet out-of-town damsels
were with us again yesterday and
gasped from out their fur collars and
"mum" bouquets their usual timely;
and appropriate remarks, such as:
"Ooooh don't those gobs and dough-.
boys look just too nice-my! but it
must be grand to live here."
"How many planes can you see
now-isn't this thrilling?"
"Aren't those M. A. C. boys rough-
why do they get in the way of that'
Michigan man when they can see he
is trying to run with that ball'?"
It was a great day all right and
seemed like the good 01 times with
that blushing home town girl saying
her staccato "Ohs" and "Ahs" from
your side.
Between the aeroplanes and the
Blue Devils one felt cross-eyed and
cross-'itted by the end of the fourth
quarter.
NURSES NEEDED
FOR WAR WORK
The National Organization for pub-
lic health nursing, in conjunction with
its war program committee having
headquarters at- Washington, is mak-
ing every effort to meet the urgent
demand for public health nursing
both in America and abroad. The
needs for reconstruction workers in
this field are imperative.
- ,-The University of Michigan will
soon have a departient of public
health nursing which will be the
training center for all nurses in this
tate.
"Although the plan for the depart-
ment at the University was made
some time ago," said Mrs. L. C. Gret-
ter, superintendent of the Detroit Vis-
iting Nurses' association and estate
chairman of the committee on Red
Cross nursing," the project was al-
lowed to lapse temporarily because the
military demands had taken all avail-
able trained nurses and directors."
Mrs. Gretter also stated that the state
proposes to place a public. health
nurse in every county.
The nurse on duty finds that her
abilities as a teacher, adviser, and
friend are needed along with her
medical services. Caring for the ba-
bies, school children, men and wom-
en in industry, and families in need,
of her services, all receive a part of
her time.
Special courses for graduate nurses
are strongly urged by the national
organization. The new problems of
applied economics and sociology can
only be solved by such students.
CARELESSNESS OF ENGINEER
WAS- CAUSE OF RAIL-WRECK
Investigation of the wreck which
happened at Dexter early Friday
morning, has brought to light the fact
that'the accident was a result of the
failure of the engineer on the freight
coming east to read the semaphore.
The trains were badly smashed up.
Chas. Wells, one of the men injur-
ed, died early Saturday morning at
St. Joseph's hospital. His death was
a result of burns. Fredick Blanch-
ard and Alva Rogers, though quite
badly shaken up and burned, are out
of danger. .
$1,143 THROWN INTO FLAG AT
FERRY FIELD YESTERDAY
The flag which was carried around
Feriy field yesterday at the game con-

GAME HARD FOUGHT DURING T
FIRST HALF OF THE
CONTEST
M. A. C. SCORES ONCE
BY FORWARD PASSIN4
Steketee's Kicking Gives oestme
Big Advantage Over
Farmers
For the fourth time this seas
Michigan met and defeated its opp
sition.
In a game that showed that it:
hard to find a team of the strengi
of the Wolverines, the Michigan Ai
gies, the old state rivals of the MaIs
and Blue, fell before Coach Yost
products to the tune of 21-6.
Promised to Be a Fight
What promised to be one of th
hardest fought games ever played o
Ferry field, turned into a runawe
for the Maize and Blue, in the se
ond quarte when they scored t'
touchdowns in rapid succession. La
-r, however, the game became mo
interesting when the farmer team"
sorted to aerial attack's, which ne
ted them thir only count
Toe work stood out prominently
the contest, with Steketee acting ft
Michigan, and Ackley doing the -woi
for the Aggies. The Michigan fres
man booted the ball for an avera
of over 55 yards, helping greatly t
wards gaining Michigan its points.
To Cohn, Knode and Goetz go tU
honiors for the three touchdown
while Steketee must be given Ut
credit for the other three points. F
lowing each touchdown, he booted ti
ball over the white bar.
Goetz' touchdown proved one of t
sensational plays of the game. N
satisfied with Playing a wonderful o
fensive and defensive game in t
line, he watched his opportunity, .a
picked up one of the Aggies' fur
bles, on their 20 yard line and rac
across the goal line for a touchdow
Jnode and Cohn Score
Knode and Cohn got their points 1
straight football. Assisted wonde
fully by the line men, they we
able to make long . gains, especial
through the right tackle of the visl
ors.
Vick, the first year center, had n
trouble at all in handling his end
the game, refusing to give in . a
instance before the attacks of the A
gies. And when it came to drivi]
holes for the Maize and Blue, Vic
work could always be counted upc
Despite the fact that the farme
had been touted to be an even mat
for the Wolverines, the Yostmen foul
it no great trouble in taking the lo
end of the score.
With cheeringrat a high standai
neither team lacked a momeit's bac
ing. The Aggies, 2,000 strong, Su
ported their men to the final whst
despite their defeat. Their band - ke
heroically at work to support th
men, yet it was all to no avail, t
Yostmen were the better.
Four bands helped the 15,000 spe
taters keep the field in a consta
uproar. The khaki of the army a
the blue of the navy were promine
in both the north and south stan
The united branches of the service,
by Lamport, Parmenter, and Whi
made the noise greater than at a
time this season.
- (Continued on Page Three)
FOOTBALL RESULTS

Wisconsin 14; 0. S. U. 3.
Illinois 29; U. of 0.-0.

PRESBYTERIAN CH URCH
HURON AND DIVISION
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
Cordially invites Presbyterian and all students not otherwise affiliated
. to the following Sunday services:
10.30 Morning Worship
11:45 Bible Class for University Women
Leader, Prof. T. E. Rankin
6:30 P. M. Young People's Evening Service
Morning service closes in time for members of S. A. T. C. aid Naval Units t' go to dinner

tained $1,14$ when it was taken out Pittsburg 32; Georgia Tech. 0.
of the field. The money was counted Great Lakes N. T. 7;. Navy 6.
by Mr. R. M. Campbell, treasurer of Kalamazoo Norm. 62; Hope 0.
the University, and these figures are
official. If we estimate that there Hoover Arrives in London
were 15,000 people at the game, we London, Nov. 23.-Herbert C. I
obtain an average of a little less than er, the American food administi
10 cents apiece. and Edward M. Hurley, chairma
the shipping board, have arrived
Union to Hold Open House Today They were met by representativ(
The dining room of the Michigan the British food and shipping de
Union will be open all of today to ments. They will remain here
members. The alumni are especially the week-end and then proceed
invited to make use of the building. Paris.

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