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November 23, 1918 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-23

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THE WEATHER
COOL SAND CLOUDY
TODAY

rbpSir

~Iaitj

PRESS
CIAO'AM) NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 46. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1918. PRICE THREE CENTS

WOLVERNE-AGIE
GAE, READY FOR
REFEREE WHISTLE
BOTH COACHES AGREE CONTEST
WILL BE FILLED WITH
FIGHT
'THREE CHEER LEADERS
TO FURNISH THE PEP
Four Bands Will Form Parade With
Army and Navy Battalions to
Escort Visitors
Amid the music made by four mil-
:itary bands, the annual clash between
the Michigan Agges and the Wolver-
ines will be inaugurated at Ferry field
this afternoon.
Promptly at 2 o'clock, the whistle
will blow, the ball will be ticked off,
and the thirteenth annual contest be-
tween the two schools will be on
again.
Paade to Be Held
With a battalion of S. A. T. C. men
a battalion of naval unit men, and
bands from the University, with those
fbrom M. A. C., a parade will be formed
at the railroad station, and will march
to Ferry field. The battalions of sold-
iers and sailors will make up a guard
of honor for the visiting rooters who
are expected in the city about 1:30
o'clock this afternoon.
At Ferry field, the ceremonies of the
day will start with a review of the
. A. T. C. and naval unit men, who
will march up and down the field be-
fore the stands.
The stands are expected to overflow
with. the monstrous crowd that will
be here to witness the contest. From3
East Lansing 'alone, fully 1500 peo-
pie are expected. Special permission
h... as been obtained whereby the S. A.
TC.men of the school are permitted
to attend. Two special cars from the
farmer school will bring the team
and their rooters.
Interesting Contest
That the game will be an interesting
contest is assured by the coaches of
both squads. Coach Yost said yester.
day, that he did not expect to take,
thedd contest without a fight, while
Gathier of the Aggies has been trim-
mniig his eleven all season, for the
contest with the Yostmen.
"The teams will be evenly matched,"
is the opinion of Coach Yost. "It is
going to be one of 'the best games of
the year because our boys will have to
put up a fight if they want to take
the bacon."
Gauther's eleven is in better con-
dition now, than it has been at any
time this year. His team, like Coach
Yosts, is made up largely of inexper-
ienced men, yet they are men who
have succeeded in earning responsi-
ble positions on agood eleven, assur-
ing their ability.
(Continued on Page Three)
DANCE AND STUNTS
AT LEAGUE PARTY
A variety of amusements were of-
fered by the girls who attended the
first Women's league party of the
year, given yesterday afternoon in the
parlors of Barbour gymnasium.
Twoi farces staged in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall started the program. The
first had as its theme the romance of
Red Cross nursing, shown by twol

nurses, who were erstwhile blondined
department More clerks, and a wound-
ed hero. Emily Loman, Winifred
Parsons, and Dorothy Shields starred
in this production. The other skit
was entitled "The Feet of Folly," and
received hearty applause.
After the dramatics were over the
girls descended to the parlors of the
gymnasium. Here they were given a
choice of cutting comfort bags, mend-
ing socks and hospital garments, or
dancing. While 'dancing proved the
most popular pastime, quite a bit of
work was done in;the parlors. The
music was furnished by Ike Fisher's
orchestra.
Headquarters of Red Cross Move
Headquarters of the Home Service
Section of the American Red Crosse
have been removed from 514 Williams
street to No. 7 Nickels Arcade. Tel.
No. 386M.

FRENCH ARMY BAND
HAS NOTED LEADER
That Ann Arbor music lovers will
be indulged with an exceptionally fine
-concert this evening by the French
Army band, is the opinion of Dr. Al-
bert A. Stanley of the University
school of music.
"It will be a rich treat for every-
one," Dr. Stanley stated. "It is un-
der the leadership of Gabriel Pares,
whose mastery was displayed in the
concerts by the band of the Garde
Republique under his direction at the
St. Louis exposition. M. Pares is not
alone an uncomparable conductor, but
he is the author of the most author-
itative treatise on wind instruments
and band orchestration in existence."
There are 61 musicians in the or-
chestra, all of whom have been wound-
ed in the trenches of France and dec-
orated for bravery, many of them sev-
eral times. As a result- of their
splendid service in the army they
have been called the "Blue Devils"
of France. Tickets may be procured
at the office of the University school
of music.
REGENTS PROVIDE FOR
PAYMENT OF "FLU" MAKS
ACCEPT PORTRAIT OF EX-DEAN
SCHLOTTERBECK FOR
MEMORIAL HALL
Payment for the masks which were
used by the students and faculty
members of the University against the
recent influenza epidemic, was ap-
(roved by the Board of Regents at
their second meeting of the year yes-
terday. The report showed that 15,-
730 masks' were issued at a total cost
of $461.41, or at the rate of almost
three cents per mask. But the fact
that many of the masks were salvag-
ed, made them serve a double pur-
pose.
A portrait of the late Julius 0.
Schlotterbeck, formerly dean of the
phar gacy college, was accepted by the
board and is to be hung in the Alum-
ni Memorial hall. The board also
accepted a portrait of Winfield Scott,
which was given by John R. Kempf,
'90E, of Detroit. The regents passed
a resolution stating that hereafter no
portrait will be hung in Memorial
hall unless approved by the regents'
*committee.
Bonds, given by the Chicago Alum-
ni, amounting to $3,800, the interest
of which is to be used as scholarships
for women in the University, were re-
ceived. A vote of thanks was extend-
ed for the donation by the late Wil-
liam H,. Murphy, '12, of $1,000, which
is to be used for humanistic studies.
The leave of absence of Prof. S. G.
Zowski, who is doing economic work
in New York pertaining to the prob-
lems of Poland, was extended. Leaves
of absence were also granted to Prof.
William A. Paton, of the economics
department, and to Prof. F. C. New-
combe, of the botany department. The
appointments of H. D. Bronson, '20E,
and Elinor Mullett, '21, were made.
Degrees were granted to the fol-
lowing: William F. Brown, '18L, de-
greeof LL.B., La Vern Ross, grad.,
degree of A.M., and C. Jewet, a nurse's
diploma. Raymond W. Fairchild was
appointed to a University fellowship.
The incorporation of the Law Re-
view was recognized. Previous to
this year the publication was publish-
ed by the law faculty, but hereafter
it wil be published by the Michigan

Law Review association. The Board
of Regents voted to hold the next
meeting on Friday, Dec. 13.
-General Pershing Enters Luxemberg
Luxemberg, Nov. 21 (Delayed). -
General Pershing, the American com-
mander-in-chief, and his staff, entered
the city of Luxemberg this afternoon
at the head of his troops. The gen-
eral was greeted by thousands of
cheering Luxembergers, and with the
blowing of sirens and the ringing of
church and school bells. The 18th
infantry of the first division were the
first American troops to enter the
city.
Yeoman IV. J. Hinchman Ill
Yeoman W. L. Hinchman is confin-
ed to his room with a severe cold.
This will prevent him from doing any
work in the navy headquarters un-
til next week.

COINGRESS CUTS
BIG REVENUE ILL
Body Confines Decrease to Tobacco,
Luxuries and Semi-
. Luxuries
LOSS OF GASOLINE TAX
COSTS U. S. $40,000,000
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 22. - Reduc-
tions aggregating $500,000,000 in the
yield from the new war revenue bill
were made today by the senate fi-
nance committee in revising the meas-
ure downward in the $6,000,000,000
total for 1919 proposed by Secretary
McAdoo. The decrease was confined
principally to the tobacco, luxury,
semi-luxury, and other special and
excess schedules.
Among the more important deci-
sions today were elimination of the
luxury schedule proposed in the house
bill, levying of 20 per cent on costly
articles of clothing and other mer-
chandise, and estimated to raise
$184,795,000; elimination of the house
tax of two cents a gallon on gaso-
line, estimated to yield $40,000,000;
reduction from 15 to 5 per cent, or
about $200,000,000 in revenue in rates
on many articles classed as semi--
luxuries, and a reduction of about
one-half of the house rates on tobac-
co, a cut of about $54,000,000 in rev-
enue.
Football Program
flMakes Quick Hfit
The moment it hit the street, it
created a sensation-that is what they
say of the 1918 M. A. C.-Michigan of-
ficial football program.
.Hundreds of the clever little book-
lets about the game this afternoon
were sold yesterday, immediately aft-
er it had come off the press. The
five color cover illustrating football,
and both branches of the service as
well, proved irresistable to the people
on the streets, and the issue went like
hot cakes.
More will be ready for the public
today. They will be sold on the streets
and at Ferry field, for 25 cents.
A complete account of both teams,
with all of the information necessary
to a thorough understanding of the
annual contest, is contained in the
book. Highly illustrated, it has a very
pleasing artistic effect, and has been
pronounced by those who know, as be-
ing one -of the best football programs
issued in years.
CAPT. PUTT URGES
CANTEEN CLEAN-UP
The S. A. T. C. headquarters will
carry on a clean-up campaign here in
Ann Arbor, according to Captain G.
W. Putt. He says that a great many
soda fountains and drug stores
around town are extremely dirty and
unsanitary. He also protests about
the dirty condition of the army and
navy canteen on South University ave-
nue. "These places will have to be
cleaned up," he said, "or I will not
allow the boys to attend them. There
are a few places in town which are
clean and we will publish .a list of
these in order to let the men know
which places they may attend. I hope
that after this is published the. soda

fountains and restaurants will clean
up their places, as the boys positively
cannot attend them if they are not
clean. I cannot close down any of
them but they will certainly lack the
trade of the S. A. T. C. if they do not
follow this suggestion."
DONOR OF BARBOUR GYMNASIUM
ENTERTAINED BY DEAN JORDAN
Dean Myra B. Jordan entertained
Mr. Ralph Levi Barbour of Detroit
and the Oriental women of the Uni-
vdrsity at her home Friday. Mr. Bar-
bour, who was a former regent of the
University, has shown most gener-
ously his interest in the growth of the
University. Beside his endowment of
the Barbour Scholarships for Orien-
tal women he is responsible for the
Barbour gymnasium and the Betsy
Barbour dormitory, now soon to be
built.

NO CONVOCATION
S A Y S PRESIDENT
No convocation will be held this
year, according to a statement of
President Harry B. Hutchins yester-
day. He said that the influenza epi-
demic, the military organizations, and
the coming of the French mission has
brought about circumstances that
make it inadvisable to hold it. Convo-
cation exercises were started here
six years ago as an annual affair.
Much interest was shown in them by
faculty and students and they were
well attended.
It is the one occasion of the year
when the regents, faculty, and stu-
dents of all the colleges meet togeth-
er ahd are addressed by the presi-
dent of the University.
QUOTh GROWS SLIGHTLY
AS CAMPIGN ADVNCE
SOLICITING RECEIVES GOOD RE-
SPONSE FROM CIVILIAN
MEN
Campaigning is still being kept up
by the soliciting committees in the
hopes of getting Michigan's quota up
near $20,000 'before final returns. are
turned in. A talk to the men in the
naval unit at mess yesterday brought
$352 more, and a few contributions
are still coming in at Lane hall.
The totals to date are as follows:
Total Friday, $15,793.78. Yesterday
men from the naval unit turned in
$367, two women gave $40, and 112
civilian men, $509, making the total,
$16,709.78.
The teams sent out to canvass the
men met with cordial response. Those
who did not volunteer showed they
were not slackers, but that they were
too busy to make pledges at the
booths, in the opinon of Mr. N. C.
Fetter. Mr. Fetter also said, "The
experience of this campaign proves
that the soliciting method is by far
the more satisfactory way of secur-
ing results and for reaching all those
who desire to give." The committees
will be busy till Monday.
S.A. T. C. Schedule
Like Girls' School
When it comes to schedule the S.
A. T. C. has everything on the pro-
verbial girls' boarding school with its
bells for eating, sleeping, and think-
ing. The unit of time the average
warrior has to himself is the al-
mighty minute.
Between that gentle alarm, the first
sergeants whistle, and reveille at 6:25
o'clock, mes braves have 10 minutes
in which to dress and fall in outside
their barracks. Hard on the fastidi-
ous dresser, you say? In the words
of the poet: "There ain't no such
animule." He fell into the discard
(or eternal K. P.) long ago.
Throughout the day, periods of re-
creation occur with terrible brevity
and scarcity. F'rinstance, there are,
15 minutes after noon mess in which
to write home phone her or eat.
Then, there is the well known play
hour following the two hour after-
noon drill. It's a wonderful relief-a
shave, a shine, something to sign-
something issued, a mass meeting or
a lecture-and mebbe-of course one

couldn't forget the possibility of a
bath.N
After evening mess three-quarters
of an hour of freedom; and from 9
o'clock until lights out NOTHING to
do or listen to, except an occasional
few kind words breathed by an offi-
eer about "the conduct of the com-
pany" or other antics of peace.
THREE MEN INJURED IN WRECK
AND CHIEF ENGINEER KILLED
A collision between a freight train
and an express occurred at Dexter
on the Michigan Central lines yester-
day morning about 5 o'clock.
J. F. Gosset, chief engineer, died at
St. Joseph's hospital shortly after
being brought here.
Chas. Wells was scalded and one
leg was cut off. Alva Rogers and
Frederick Blanchard, who were from
Jackson, received minor injuries.

WILLIAM M1ADOO RESIGNS POSITIONS;
FOURTH MEMBER, TO QUIT- CABINET1
.LEAVES TO REPLENISH OWN FORTUNE

THE WAY THEY WILL
LINEUP V
Miclagan M. A. C.
Dunne...... .L.E. ..... Schwei
Goetz........L.T.........Bos
Adams......L.G....Van Orden
Vick .........C........ Archer
Freeman .....RG......... Johns
Fortune ...... R.T....... Franson
Boville ........ R.E........ Young
Knode .........Q...........Ferris
Cohn ........L.H......Simmons
Steketee .......F.........Graves
Perrin ........ R.H....... Dunphy
First Navy Night
Success At "Y
The first Navy Night, held yester-
day evening at the Newberry "Y,"
went with a rush. Fifteen fast bouts
were staged, each for two rounds.
Some of the men were a little short
on science, but all were willing
enough to mix. A good crowd cheered
them on.
A committee of the enlisted men had
charge of the program. Another se-
ries of bouts, by the faster men among
those who boxed last night, is plan-
ned for next Friday.
The army "Y" has arranged an-
other athletic program for Newberry
hall this evening. Two wrestling
-matches by men from section B are
scheduled. It is planned to have some
boxing from section A at Lane hall.
The usual free movies will berun for
army and navy men.
TWO TERM QUESTION
BEING DISCUSSED
President Harry B. Hutchins is
making investigations toward a settl-
ing of the question concerning the re-
turn to the two term system in the
University. He has wired to head-
quarters at Washington to see wheth-
er or not it will be possible for Mich-
igan to go back to the previous ar-
rangement of two semesters. As yet
nothing definite has been learned. The
majority of the faculty are in favor
of the semester system, but all hinges
on the decision from Washington.
CROWDS THRONG TO
DORMITORY BAZAAR
The Red Cross bazaar being held
at Martha Cook building opened with
success yesterday afternoon. The
downstairs was decorated in true
Christmas fashion.- The things the
girls have industriously been work-
ing on for several weeks showed their
effort and all the patrons were pleas-
ed with the gifts offered for sale. The
attractions at the bazaar are many
and include "seventh daughter of
a seventh daughter," who faultlessly
predicts the future; a grab bag with
its surprises, and refreshments of tea
and wafers. The corridors have been
filled ever since the opening and the
sales were heavy yesterday. It will
continue this morning and will close
at 6 o'clock tonight.
S. A. T. C. SUPERVISED STUDY
STARTS IN EARNEST MONDAY
The order issued two weeks ago
that all S. A. T. C. men are to attend
study hall between 7:30 o'clock in the
morning and 2:30 o'clock in the aft-
ernoon whenever they do have classes
is to be strictly enforced beginning

next Monday..
Every man in the corps has been
assigned to a room where he will re-
port for supervised study at any hour
during the day when he is not in
class. The lists were prepared by fac-
ulty men in charge of military stu-
dejts' attendance.. They were read
to the men yesterday in Hill audi-
torium, where all the men were as-
sembled at 4:15 o'clock. An officer
assisted the faculty men to read the
names of each man and the group to
which he has been assigned. The
reading of the names took over an
hour.

VARIOUS OFFICES TO RECEIVE
SEPARATE APPOINTMENTS
BY U. S. HEAD
PRESIDENT WILSON TO
ACCEPT RESIGNATION
New Secretary to Float Two Liberty
Loans to Finance All Recon.
struction
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 22. - William
Gibbs McAdoo, secretary of the treas-
ury, director-general of railroads, and
also discussed as one of the president-
ial possibilities of 1920, has resigned
his positions to return to private bus-
iness.
President Wilson has accepted his
resignation. Mr. McAdoo will give up
the treasury as soon as a successor is'
appointed. He wishes to lay down his
work as director-general of railroads
by Jan. 1, but will remain if 'the
President has not then chosen a suc-
cessor.
U. S. to Have Two More Loans
Upon the new secretary and treasur-
er, whoever it may be, will devolve
the task of financing the nation
through the transition period of war
to peace, which probably will include
at least two more Liberty Loans, and
possibly also a further revision of the
system of war taxation.'
Letters between President Wilson
and Mr. McAdoo made public today
with the announcement of the resign-
ation, gave Mr. McAdoo's reasons for
leaving the cabinet as solely for the
purpose of replenishing his personal
fortune, and expressed deep regret
at losing his son-in-law from his of-
ficial family.
Wilson to Fill Positions Separately
It is entirely probable that the
President. will fill separtely the of-
fices of secretary of the trreasury and
director-general of the railroads.
There was nothing official tonight on
which to base a statement as to who
would be under consideration for sec-
retary of the treasury. On previous
occasions when a successor to Mr.
McAdoo was discussed, John Skelton
Williams, controller of the currency,
and W. T. G. Harding, governor of
the federal reserve board have most
generally been mentioned. Paul War-
burg, formerly member of the reserve
board and a prominent New York
banker, and Russel C. Leffingwell, as-
sistant secretary of the treasury also
are recognized among possibilities.
Fourth Member to Resign
Mr. McAdoo receives $12,000 a year
as secretary of the treasury, the uni-
form salary of cabinet members and
nothing as director-general of rail-
roads. Secretary McAdoo is the fourth
member of the cabinet to resign.
Mr. McAdoo took a prominent part
in shaping the administrations leg-
islative policies, and possibly this-
brought him into the field of Demo-
cratic presidential possibilities as they
were being discussed, but so far., as
any one knows Mr. McAdoo has not
expressed himself on that subject.
Since the war broke out in 1914,
Secretary McAdoo has faced many
economic problems, the tremendous
Liberty Loan, and corollary problems
of financing war expenses has been
his principle concern. As the leader
builder of the federal reserve system
as' an early advocate of a govern-
ment built merchant marine, and in
the development of the federal farm
loan system, he was known partic-
ularly.
3 Conference Teams Clash Today

Chicago, Nov. 22. - Football will
reach its climax in the middle west
tomorrow with Illinois meeting Chi-
cago, Wisconsin playing O. S. U. at
Columbus, Northwestern meeting Iowa
at Iowa City in the- important Big Ten
contest.
Chief interest centers in the Chica-
,go-Illinois game, for if Illinois wins
its fourth victory of the season, it
wil have a stronger claim for- the
championship. Iowa, Wisconsin, and
O. S. U. already have been defeated
by Illinois, which has played better
football than Illinois. Northwestern
is the only other unbeaten team.

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