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November 16, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1918.

PRICE

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ALLIED OFFICIALS
TO HOLD MEETINGS

DE-

(By the Associated Press)
Paris, Nov. 15.- Meetings, begin-
ning today by the representatives of
the associated governments, will be
largely of an informal nature. They
will consist chiefly of conferences with
foreign ministers, rather than of pre-
miers, with a view of meeting a com-
mon understanding on international
questions and definitely arranging the
program of the peace conference.
One of the first conferences held
today was at the residence of Colonel
House, the head of the American dele-
gation, where Foreign Minister Son-
nimo, of Italy, spent some time. It
was expected that foreign Secretary
Balfour, of Great Britain, would ar-.
rive later.

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PEP MEE[T SPELLS Ur9
Gornetsky's New S. A. T. C. Song
Proved to Be Great
Hit
ANDREW J. JAMIESON, '10E,
MAIN SPEAKER OF AFTERNOON
New Kick-off Yell for Opening of the
Game Today Taught to.
Students

L
LAG

TEUTONS TO RETIRE
IN FORCE SATURDAY
(By the Associated Press)
Headquarters of the American first
army in France, Nov. 15.-The Ger-
mans in force will begin Saturday to
leave the points they now occupy
northeast of the American lines, ac-
cording to German wireless messages.
Opposite the American front there
was much wagon and automobile traf-
fic Friday, the Germans apparently
hauling out the supplies of war mate-
rial which are not to be left behind.
A few German rear guards will re-
main on patrols and to pick up any
stragglers, should some of the Ger-
mans attempt to desert. American
observation balloons went up today,
the observers endeavoring to get an
idea of the extent of the German with-
drawal, but most of the traffic was so
far back that little of the activity
could be seen.
PRIMA ONNAANNOUNCES
PROGRM FOR TONIGHT

d Press)
- Edward N.
United States
iced here to-
departure for
iment intends
ry speedily a
rican Expedi-
urpose of Mr.
is to arrange
sportation.
ssion had pri-
ing the boys
ent wounded,
o would have
front had the

CHAOTIC CONDITIONS ABROAD CAUSE
ALLIES TO ADVANCE ASSEMBLY D9TE
POLITICAL CRISES HOLD. UP DEC15

BRITISH SHIP REPORT
SHOWS DEFEAT OF SUB
1918 OUTPUT BEATS 1913, BANNER
YEAR OF 2,800,000 TONS
BY 700,000
(By the British Wireless Service)
London, Nov. 15.-The parliamen-
tary secretary of the ministry of
shipping, speaking in the house of
commons yesterday, gave a resume
of the merchant ship building opera-
tions in Great Britain during the pe-
riod. of the war.
In 1913 he said the record figure
of 1,900,000 tons was reached. In.
1914, when the war broke out, the
output fell to 1,700,000 tons In 1915,
it decreased to 650,000 tons; in 1916
to about 540,000 tons, and in 1917 it
rose to a little under 1,200,000. Dur-
ing the 12 months ended Oct. 31, 1918,
the total output approximated 1,600,-

to
g-

With a meeting of the entire student
body of the University held in Hill
auditorium yesterday afternoon, the
supporters of the Maize and Blue are
fully prepared to back the Varsity
football team in the contest this aft-
ernoon.
The monster pep gathering began
with a show of spirit that spells de-
feat for the Syracuse eleven this aft-
ernoon. With "Brute"' Lamport, the
clever little freshman and Hugh
White, the "gob" cheer leader, leading
the noise making, Hill auditorium
rang with cheers.
Andrew J. Jamieson, '1OE, at pre-
sent with the Detroit Y. M. C. A., was
the main speaker of the afternoon.
With a flow of humor thatakept the
students in an uproar of laughter the
former student of the University
brought out the last ounce of pep
that remained in the student body.
Abraham Gornetsky introduced his
new S. A. T. C. song which was im-
mediately declared a big hit. Under
the direction of Mr. T. Harrison, of
the School of Music, the audience soon
learned and sang it, accompanied by
the combined S. A. T. C. and naval
band which was also on the plat.-
form.
The school songs came in for their
share of attention when Mr. T.
Harrison taught them to the as-
sembly. "The Victors," "Varsity," and
"The Yellow and Blue," were played.
Not to be outdone by any other
gathering, the "Star Spangled Ban-
ner" topped off the entire meeting.
With the strains of the national an-
them ringing through the big auditor-
ium and with the embryo soldiers
standing at attention, the lusty voices
of the patriotic students carried the
spirit of democracy over the entire
campus.
Syracuse is to be met with a series
of new yells introduced at the meet-
ing. A new "kick-off" yell was in-
troduced. In other words, beginning
with the very blowing of the whistle
to start the game, to the minute it is
blown to end it; the Michigan side of
Ferry field will be in a constant yet
systematic uproar.

ARIAS FROM VARIOUS
KNOWN OPERAS TO
GIVEN

WELL.-
BE

S. Flag
flying the
it is hoped

NAVAL UNIT, NOTICE!S
Men in the naval unit can sub-
scribe for the 1919 Michiganen-
sian through their company
commanders. Special arrange-
ments have been made by the
business manager to have the of-
ficers take subscriptions.
Victory 2Bulletins
(By the Associated Press)
Copenhagen, Nov. 15.-The Prussian'
government has announced that
Prussian future will be determined
by a constituent assembly, and the
Wurtemberg government has made a
similar announcement. All the fac-
tories in Berlin have resumed opera-
tions.
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 15.-Otto Bauer, edi-
tor of the Vienna arbeiter Zeitung,
has been appointed Austrian foreign
minister, according to a Vienna dis-
patch to the Exchange Telegraph re-
ceived by way of Copenhagen.
(By the British Wireless Service)
Paris, Nov. 15.-The entry of the
king and queen of Belgium Into Brus-
sels has been postponed. The sol-
emn event probably will take place
Nov. 23, coinciding with the re-open-
ing of the Belgium chambers. Mean-
while special trains are being organ-
ized for the transfer of the Belgian
administration and diplomatic bodies.
(A Paris dispatch Wednesday said
that King Albert and his family In-
tended to enter Brussels today)

mil-

)v. 15.- The state war
board here decided to
community house at
Approximately $250,000
it in the construction of
and it is estimated $50,-
plete it." The board onj
announced the project
idoned along with other
the organization, but a
day with the biulding
t which it was pointed
building would benefit
lers during demobiliza-
t the amount required
ively small resulted in
complete the work.
the community house
inst the termination of
by the war board and
rom prominent citizens
e state who thought the
e continued. There was
, however, that any
plan to bring the activ-
e was made.
ates" Greatly Affected
Indiana university had
pleasure of making or
last week-end. This
as another preventive
)mbatting the influenza

Explanatioki of these figures, he
said, rested with the victory over
Germany's submarines. Taking the
whole period, from the inception of
the convoy system, in the summer of
1917 to Nov. 2, this year the convoys
included about 47,000,000 gross tons
of merchant shipping, and losses
were 1.1 per cent.
Building now had risen to the mark
of nearly 145,000 tons per month, he
said, and the net loss of shipping had
been reduced to a negligible figure,
the loss in September being less than
7,000 tons. In short, the submarine
campaign had been beaten. The sec-
retary declared that it. was only beat-
en because the government had de-
voted the labor supply more largely
to the admiralty than to the mer-
chant shipping.
The output in the 12 months ending
Oct. 31, 1918, he placed at 2,900,000
tons. Thus, he said, the- virtual out-
put of these 12 months was nearly
3,000,000 tons, as against 2,300,000 in
1913, which was a record year.
ANN ARBOR BRANCH OF RED
CROSS HOLDS ANNUAL MEETING
At the annual meeting of the Ann
Arbor branch of the American Red
Cross, held in the high school audi-
torium Tuesday evening, the follow-
ing report of membership was made:
annual members, 3,513; subscribing
members, 330; contributing members,
24; sustaining members, 2; life
members, 1, making in all a total of
3,870.
Mrs. George Hall gave an account
of the work done at the Newberry
infirmary for convalescent S. A. T.
C. men. Dr. L. P. Hall told of sim-
ilar work done at the Fifth avenue
infirmary. For this institution a
sum of $300 has been given volun-
tarily, including $50 from Chelsea peo-
ple.
Individuals and groups in Ann Ar-
bor and throughout the country have
been generous in furnishing supplies;
and other necessities.1

Anna Case, prima donna lyric so-
prano of the Metropolitan Opera com-
pany, will make her debut in Ann Ar-
bor at 8 o'clock this evening in Hill
auditorium. Mr. Charles G. Spross
will assist Miss Case at the piano.
Those who have course tickets for
the concert should detach from the
book coupon. number 2 and present
it for admittance, retaining coupon
number 1 for admission to the Caruso
concert, which will take place later
in the year.
Miss Case has chosen the follow-
ing program:
Songs-(a), Separazione, Old Ital-
Ian Folksong arranged by G. Sgam-
bati; (b) Lithuanian Song, Chopin;
(c) Skogen Sover (The Woods Sleep),
Hugo Alven; (d) "Charley Is My
Darlin'," Old- Scotch.
Songs-(a) Angelus, Augusta Chrs-
trom Renard; (b) Il nelge, Bemberg;
(c) The Princess, Grieg; (d) Dans
ropte felen, Soderman.
Aria-"Depuis le jour," from Louise,
Charpentier.
Songs-(a) "I Feel Thy Breath
Blow Round Me," Rubinstein; (b) Les
Papillon couleur de nelge, d'Ambro-
so; (c) Synnoves Song, Halfdan Kje-
rulf; (d) Serenade Francaise, Leon-
cavallo.
Songs-(a) Dreams, Horsman; (b)
Slumber Song, MacDowell; (c) "Rob-
in, Robin, Sing Me a Song," Spross.

I

STUDENTS' NOTICE!
All students who have not ver-
ified their names or corrected
their addresses for the Students'
Directory should do so at once.
Copies of the Directory have
been placed on the bulletin
boards in University hall and
the Engineering building where
such changes and verifications
may be made. Today is the last
day this opportunity will be giv-
en.

JEWISH SOCIETY
TO HOLD SOCIAL
The Jewish Students' congregation
and the Menorah society will usher
in their year's activities Sunday aft-
ernoon at a social to be held in Lane
hall. Invitations have been sent to
all Jewish men and women on the
campus, and the time of the affair
has been set for 2:30 o'clock so that
S. A. T. C. and naval unit men may
attend.
The entertainment will be in the
form of a "get-together," at which
it is hoped all of those present will
become acquainted with each other.
A social committee has been appoint-
ed with Nathan Salon, '20m, and Irene
J. Rosenberg, '21, as chairmen of the
men's and women's sections.
Dr. Leo M. Franklin, of Detroit,
Sergeant-major Alfred Fischer, Prof.
I. Leo Sharfman, and Abraham J.
Gornetzky, president of the congre-
gation, will deliver short talks. Mu-
sic, both classical and "jazz," will be
furnished. "Eats," too, are being ar-
ranged for.
The Jewish congregation last year
met each Sunday evening. When the
assemblies will be held this year will
be decided at the social.

CAMPUS SHORT OF
WAR WORK QUOTA
With yesterday as the last day for
voluntary subscriptions, only $1,000
was gained over the day before and
the campus is still about $28,000
short of its quota in the United War
Work campaign. The committee in
charge will make the first calls to-
day in soliciting subscriptions from
those who have not volunteered.
Miss Ruth Lieber, chairman of the
student campaign in the state, was
here yesterday and met the commit-
tee in charge, but the reports were
not of very much satisfaction The
quota at M. A. C. was $12,000 for the
enrollment of 1,600 students and they
reached their quota on the first day
of the campaign. Michigan has sub-
scribed only $12,000' in a week with
an enrollment of almost four times
as large.
The committee hopes that the cam-
pus realizes the necessity of raising
this quota in the least possible time.
If those who have not already con-
tributed will have their donations
ready when the solicitors call, they
will greatly simplify the committee's
work.

(By the Associated Press)
Berlin, by wireless to London, Nov.
15. - The new German government
has sent a message to President Wil-
son appealing to him that "in order
to save the German people from per-
ishing by starvation and anarchy."
Treat 'm Rough
Gargoyle Appears
The "Treat 'em Rough" number of
the Gargoyle is out.
It contains a lot of interesting ma-
terial. A Michigan man who saw the
Michigan-Chicago game of 13 years
ago has written a vivid account of
that game and the one of this year.
The story is one long chuckle-you
know how the men who remember
the old days feel when Stagg's men
get a beating. Another writer tells
of depressing experiences at a dental
clinic. There is a cross-fire of let-
ters from girl to soldier and soldier
to girl of a most amusing sort. A
student-poet started a rhymed his-
tory of the month's fighting - which
turned into a record of surrenders
by the Germans.
Prominent among the drawings are
a number of clever pen-and-ink pic-
tures by Margaret Jewell. Griffith
has a snappy drawing in this issue,
called "Messing." It reminds one of
Charlie Chaplin's method of consum-
ing custard pie. (Of course they don't
really act that way-Hoover would
object). There is a large double page
drawing of the sort that keeps you
busy finding anotheR and another and
another little joke among the, many
figures.
These are a few of the many inter-
esting things to be found in this is-
sue. Perhaps the best joke of all is
a joke that one of the editors play-
ed on himself-but you will enjoy bet-
ter finding that out for yourself.

ENTENTE TO RELIEVE COUNI
OF FAMINE, ANARCHY AN
BOLSHEVISM
AUTHORITIES CLAIM
DELAY HITS INDUS
President Wilson to Attend C
enee as Commissioner; Promim
Americans in List
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 155. - Dei
ments in Europe, not only in a
itary way, but in a field of int
tional politics, the tendency o:
spirit manifested by the demorn
civilian population of the centra
pires to spread to neighboring s
have influenced the Allied and I
ican governments to arrange
meeting at an early date of the
peace conference.
The Atlantic cables were bu
ed today with government mes
believed to have been made u
the most part of excnange be
Paris and Washington, where tt
ter-Allied council is endeavorix
reach an agreement as to the
and place for holding the confer
the conditions under which it
be held, and the nations that
be admitted to participation.
sideration of this last question I
ably will occupy much time, fo
most every day witnesses the bir
a new state.
Peace Conference to Meet Si
There has been a disposition t
lay the holding of the peace c
ence until the political: stuatie
Europe have somewhat crystal
but it was understood today that
er considerations finally led to'
cision by the associated govert
to proceed to assemble the confe
at the earliest date that can be
One reason for the change o:
decision is the necessity for re
ing the channels of trade and I
tries in the enemy states so as it
ford employment to labor and t
by relieve the threat of Bolshe
and anarchy. Another was the
eral desire now expressed by a
the Allied governments to reliev
civilian populations of the ce
powers from the danger of famil
being recognized that this re
can best be carried on afte
peace treaties have been ne
Delay May Affect Indu el
There also has been some a
hension that delay in the consun
ing of peace would have an inju:
effect upon industries in America
the Allied countries.
With the assurance of an earl:
sembly of the peace conference a
tion today turned to the compos
of the American commission. Th
lief is growing that President
son will attend, but probably 1
the capacity of a delegate or con
soner. It is known that Seer
Lansing will head the American
mission and Col. E M. House, Ju
Louis Drandeis, and Elihu Root,
mer secretary of state, were men
ed as others likely of selection.
sides the delegates, a number of
and navy officers must be name
assist the commission.
Sophomore Medics, Not Juniors, ]
At a meeting of the sophomore :
-ical class, held last Thursday, the
lowing officers were elected: p
dent, A. D. Ruedemann; vice-p
dent, Mildred Groesbeck; secre
L. W. Faust; treasurer, W. T. H
kiss. In error the Daily referre
these elections in yesterday's p
as having been made by the jt
medical class.

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