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November 12, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-12

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IND SLIGHTLY
WARNER

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ASSOCIATEE
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI
SERVICE,

No. 36. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1918. PRICE THREE (

No. 36.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1918.

PRICE THREE

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'ANKS

FIGHT

TO

LAST

ENTENTE COMMNDIERS PROVIDE FOR
VIOLATION OF-"MERESCRAP Of PAPER
CROWN PRINCE SHOT, SAYS REPO

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WR ENDS;
Y IMPOTENTm HITC
RARMSTC

ALL

NAVY, COLONIES,
LOST IN COMPLETE
DEFEAT

E LAST SHOTS AT
~ESTERDAY MORNING

rance Up Mouse
Closing Hours of
[ostlities

and

(By the Associated Press)
ictory-and peace.
fter more than four years of strug-
g the rights of mankind are sere-
The greatest day in the history'
tations has dawned.
he German militaristic classes-
>gant beyond expression- are in

r and crown prince are in
ees in an alien country.'
ings and potentates no
their sway.
d arms are triumphant.

Terms Amount to Complete Surrender
Deserted by her allies, Germany, on
her knees, is accepting terms of cap-
itulation which, amount virtually to
abject surrender. Except for actual
hostile military invasion, the one great
European power, the ambition of the
monarch of which was to dominate
over all, is in complete defeat.
Beaten on the field of battle, the
edict of the Allied chief command is
that the German armies shall retire
into their own homeland from all in-
vaded territory. Impotent as the Ger-
man armies shall be, also as impotent
shall be the German fleet. Colonies
are lost, and the hand that sought to
reach out and attain additional ter-
ritory, withered by the ruling of the
supreme war council at Versailles.
Must Pay For Damage Done
Reparation and restitution, in fact,
full compensation of all kinds, is to
be made by Germany for all disaster
that has followed her armies and those
of her allies throughout the world
war.
The handwriting was on the wall
for Germany. Her troops had fought
valiantly throughout more than four
years of warfare, but the army, which
had been considered in Germany as
invincible, was beaten in feats of arms
by the Allied powers, even before Ger-
many's allies deserted her, and the
ztrength of the Entente had become
apparent. Unprepared, they had re-
sisted for more than three years the
assaults of the enemy who had been
preparing for combat since the Fran-
co-Prussian war.
With the determination that could
never recognize defeat,. Belgium,
France, Italy, Serbia, and Russia were
overrun. Hard days were experienced
by the Allies, but the smile of hope-
fulness, of satisfaction in ultimate
success never faded. When finally
the United States was drawn into the
war by Germany's continued viola-
tions of international law and by the
precepts of humanity the gleam of
the dawn of victory for world demo-
cracy rose in the sky.
(Continued on Page Four)
'.

NEW RULING FOR
XMAS GIFT BOXES
Christmas presents for soldiers
should be made ready very soon.
Postmaster Abbott says that all par-
cels must be mailed before Nov. 20.
Only wooden boxes. marked "Xmas
Presents" and so fastened as to be eas-
ily inspected will be accepted. The
limit is 11 pounds at the rate of 12
cents per pound. These may be sent
to those men in France who are in
the army in any capacity or are con-
nected with the "Y," K. of C. and sim-
ilar organizations. No export license
is required.
Men in the navy, however, may
have 20 pounds sent to them at
fourth zone parcel post rates. These
boxes must be mailed to Brooklyn and
must be received there before No-
vember 15.
CAMPAIGN FOR WAR WORK
OPENS WITHHOLT TALK
RECEIPTS OF FIRST DAY SHOW
GREAT INTEREST IN
DRIVE
One of the peppiest meetings that
ever took place in Hill auditorium
was held Sunday night in the inter-
ests of the United War Work cam-
paign. The dormant enthusiasm
which had been held in check for so
many weeks by influenza, was at last
given full sway and let loose. The
walls of the auditorium resounded for
the first time this year to the locomo-
tive and "yea band."
The lower floor was filled with mem-
bers of the S. A. T. C. and the bal-
conies with men of the University
naval unit, women of the University
and townspeople. The meeting began
sharply at 7 o'clock, when the S. A.
T. C. band struck up "Varsity." Fol-
lowing this, Mr. Theodore Harrison,
of the University School of Music, led
the singing of the "Battle Hymn of
the Republic." Abraham Gornetzky,
'19, took charge of the meeting and
introduced Mr. Francis Stifler, stu-
dent "Y" secretary, who sketched
briefly the plan of the campaign. Ma-
jor Ralph H. Durkee, and Admiral
Robert M. Berry, both gave short
speeches endorsing the work of the
students, and Rev. Leonard A. Bar-
rett, pastor of the Presbyterian
church, under whose auspices the
speaker of the evening was brought
to Ann Arbor, Introduced Mr. Hamil-
ton Holt, editor of "The Independent."
Mr. Holt started out to give anec-
dotes of each of the five fronts, Bel-
gian, French, English, Italian, and
American, but become so engrossed
in his subjects, and so loath to let the
slightest pertinent detail go unmen-
tioned, that he was able to cover but
the Belgian, French, and American.
He talked sincerely and vividly of
his experiences, giving personal de-
tails and an interpetation of the sit-
uation which it is impossible to get
out of a newspaper or a book. Wom-
en stopped knitting, and men sat on
the edge of their seats because of his
intenseness and because the pictures
he was drawing before their minds
were so stirring.
He stopped speaking at 8 o'clock,
amid a thunder of applause. Mr. Har-
rison then led the singing of "The
Star Spangled Banner," and the meet-
ing broke up and adjourned as the
band played "The Victors." Mr. Holt
said -afterwards that he had never

spoken before to such a large and
appreciative audience, and that he
would like to come to Ann Arbor
again.
The total amount pledged to the
(Continued on Page Four)

WHOECITY TURNS
OUT FOR PARA
Line of March Three Miles Long. All
Activities of City Are Well
Represented
EIGHT THOUSAND PARTAKE,
CHEERED BY CROWDS ON CURBS
S. A. T. C. and Naval Unit Are Feature
at Head of Procession with
Stirring Music
Eight thousand souls with one
thought, that of peace, gave vent to
their feeling of joy yesterday after-
noon when practically entire Ann Ar-
for, including the University, partici-
pated in one of the greatest impromp-
tu celebrations the city has ever wit-
nessed.
Fully 8,000 people made up the page-
ant which was over three miles long
and took exactly 45 minutes to pas
a given spot. School children from
the first grade of the public schools
of the city to senior law students in
the University helped to form that
cosmopolitan celebration, while the
foreign elementi of the city brougt
out the idea of the melting pot when
Greeks, Russians, Chinese, Japanese,
and practically every nationality on
the globe was represented.
Such a display of patriotism was
never witnessed before in the city.
With the American colors made the
most prominent thing in the parade,
the kaiser in effigy was carried eith-
er on an impromptu scaffold built on
floats, or else was dragged at the rear
of the moving vehicles.
The S. A. T. C. and naval unit of
the University, headed by Major Dur-
kee and Admiral Berry, made up the
initial unit of the procession. The
army boys fitted out in their new
uniforms and equipment made a strik-
ing appearance, yet the navy boys,
not to be outdone were equally as
well represented. Both units had
their bands at their heads, playing
both national and University airs.
Floats were numerous and varied.
Sentiment gave the award of first
place, however, to that of the medics,
which was both clever in idea and
arrangement. The coming physicians
had an effigy of the human demon on
an operating table, and were dissect-
ing him alive.
With the passing of the colors
every man in the thousands who saw
them pass lifted his hat in reverence
to the power that made the world
safe for democracy, while the more
tender sex showed its feeling by a
glint of tears in the eyes. Their
minds could not be kept from the
boys over there who had given life
and limb for the cause, and had
triumphed.
The demonstration did not stop
with the parade, but continued on
through the evening. The theatres,
taking advantage of the lifting of the
flu ban, held special patriotic per-
formances, while the dance halls put
on 'peace" dances.
Even the sophomores, elated by the
ending of the great conflict, took ad-
vantage of the general feeling of Ioy,
and gave the freshman such a hazing
that it will be remembered forever in
the annals of Michigan history.
The flags of all of the allied na-
tions were carried in the parade.
French and Italian officers carried
their respective banners through the

streets, side by side with a native of
Great Britain and a true American.
With the stars and stripes sur-
rounded by the flags of its brother
nations,-
Democracy was saved for the world.

BRITANNIA SINKS
NEAR GIBRALTAR
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 11.-The British bat-
tle ship, Britannia, was torpedoed near
the west entrance to the straits of
Gibraltar and sank in three and one-
half hours, according to an admiralty
announcement today. Thirty-nine offi-
cers and 672 men were saved.
The Britannia, which had a dis-
placement of 16,350 tons, was launch-
ed near Portsmouth, Dec. 10, 1904. She
.was 350 feet in length, had a speed of
approximately 19 knots an hour, and
carried a peace time complement of
770 men. Her main armament con-
sisted of four 12-inch guns.
SOIF PROTESTS AGAINST
TAKING OF TRANSPORTS
SAYS ENFORCEMENT OF TERMS
WILL CAUSE MILLIONS
TO STARVE
London, Nov. 11.-The German for-
eign secretary, has addresser a mess-
age to Secretary of State Lansing re-
questing that President Wilson inter-
vene to mitigate "the fearful condi-
tions" existing in Germany.
Doctor Solf says, according to a
German wireless dispatch received
here today, that he feels that it is
his duty to draw President Wilson's
attention to the fact that the enforce-
ment of the conditions of the armis-
tice, especially the surrender of trans-
ports, means the starvation of millions
and requests that the President's in-
fluence be directed toward overcom-
ing this danger.
The President, he points out, declar-
ed that he did not wish to make war
on the German people and did not
wish to impede their government.
"The German government has re-
ceived the conditions of the armis-
tice," continues Doctor Solf. "We had
to accept the conditions but feel that
it is your duty to draw the President's
attention most solemnly, and with all
earnestness, to the fact that the en-
forcement of the conditions must pro-
duce among the German people feel-
ings contrary to those upon which
alone the reconstruction of a commun-
ity of nations can rest, guaranteeing a
just and durable peace."
SCHOOL OF MUSIC COLLECTS
SLACKER RECORDS FOR CAMPS
Approximately 100 "slacker" phono-
graph records have been received by
the Symphonic league of the Univer-
sity School of Music which is con-
ducting the campaign in Ann Arbor
for the collection of old records for
use in army cantonments. The move-
ment is world wide and is under the
auspices of the National Phonograph
Record recruiting corps. The last
opportunity to contribute records will
be today as the campaign closes to-
night.
"Slacker' 'records are those which
have become monotonous to their
owners and are lying useless in the
cabinets. Everybody who possesses
records of this sort is urged either
to send them or to leave word at the
School of Music so that they may be
called for.
President Hutchins Goes to Chicago
President Harry B. Hutchins is in
Chicago attending the annual meeting
of the representatives from the Na-
tional Association of the State uni-

versities. At this meeting, which is
in session for several days, all the
important matters that the various
universities have in common are tak-
en up and discussed.

NOTICE TO STUDENTS
Classes will again be resum-
ed this morning as usual. The
deans of the several colleges are
advised to accept no excuses for
unnecessary absences that
might be reported today. Yes-
terday's all-day dismissal was
the first that has been reported
apart from holidays, in the his-
tory of the University.
Victory Viulletins
(Havas Agency)
Paris, Nov. 11.-President Poincare
received Marshal Foch today and con-
gratulated him warmly on the sign-
ing of the armistice.
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Nov. 11.-The Handel-
esbladt says it learns that the Dutch
government will object to the for-
mer German emperor residing in Hol-
land.
- Officials of the Dutch government
and officials of the Hague have gone
to Eyesden, Holland, on the French
frontier to meet him.
(By the Associated Press)
With the American army on the
Sedan front, Nov. 11.-Germans, who
came into the American lines late to-
day, said their orders had been.to re-
tire with as little delay as possible.
They said that they had expescted to
be in their homes in Germany a week
from Sunday.
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 11. - The Admiralty
has intercepted a German wireless ad-
dressed from the 'command and sold-
iers' council on the cruiser Strass-
burg" to "all ships, torpedo boats,
destroyers, and submarines in the
North sea."
The message refers to the terms
of the armistice and declares:
"This would entail the destruction
of us all. German comrades defend
our country, against this unheard pre-
sumption.
"The German people at this fate-
ful hour address themselves to the
President with the request that he
use his influence with the Allied pow-
ers in order to mitigate these fearful
conditions."
LIEUT. PORTER TO CARE FOR
HEALTH OF MEDICAL RESERVES
Lieut. Allenel Porter of the medi-
cal division of the Navy has arrived
in Ann Arbor to take charge of the
600 medical reserves stationed here.
These men include both those in the
army and navy section of the S. A.
T. C. Lieutenant Porter has been do-
ing recruiting and S. A. T. C. work in
Indiana, being stationed at Indianapo-
lis. In his supervision of the medics
he will be responsible for all health
and sanitary conditions in that group.
Homeo Hospital Open to Public Again
The Homeopathic hospital yesterday
admitted the first patients not S. A.
T. C. men since the influnza epi-
demic got under way here. During the
epidemic the hospital was given over
entirely to members of the military
units who were suffering from influ-
enza and pneumonia. The whole hos-

pital has now been renovated and dis-
infected and is ready to receive all
classes of cases again.

the armistice to
claimed today by

who announced its terms at a joint
session of congress.
The terms herald the end of the
war because they take from Germany
the power to renew it.
Just before he went to the capitol
the President said:-
"The armistice was signed this
morning. Everything for which Am-
erica fought has been accomplished.
It will now be our fortunate duty to
assist by example, by sober, friendly
counsel, and by material aid, in the
establishment of just democracy
throughout the world."
Stripped of its malicious power, the
military autocracy, its masters driven
into exile, stands before the world
court of justice, having signed the
terms of surrender, which probably
will be recorded in history ?s the most
drastic and complete ever given out to
a defeated foe.
Guard Against "Scrap of Paper"
Reading of the full text of the terms
discloses the measures that the Unit-
ed States and the Allied governments
have taken to guarantee that Ger-
many's acceptance shall not be a
scrap of paper, and insure the de-
struction of the military caste, which
once could secretly, and of its single
choice, disturb the peace of the world.
When President Wilson concluded
his exchange of notes with Prince
Maximillian, then chancellor, admin-
istrational officials declared that al-
though his course would- not bring
about what they hoped would be more
of an unconditional surrender, it
might bring about a revolution in
Germany.
Tasks of Mercy Next'
Having lifted the yoke of militarism
from the peoples of the central em-
pires the Allies now turn to tasks of
humanity and mercy to bind up their
wounds and feed the hungry, mean-
while seeking to guide them to'a place
in the family of nations from which
they can take a part in assuring that
another such 1,500 days of blood and
horror need never come again.
Evacuation, reparation, and restitu-
tion, are the keynotes of the armis-
tice. In a word, the iron ring is
tightened, and at Germany's borders
the civilized world waits while Ger-
many reforms herself from within.
Will Probably Extend Armistice
Preparations for final peace nego-
tiations will engross American and
Allied statesmen during the next few
weeks, while Marshal Foch and the
Allied commanders will see that the
armistice terms are carried out.
Thirty days is the armistice period,
and since it hardly will be possible to
assemble the greatest peace confer-
ence in that time, an extension is
practically certain to be granted by
the victors and accepted by the van-
quished.

AGREEMENT MOST DRASTIC
HISTORY OF ENTIRE
WORLD
AUTO)RITIES TO ALL(
MORE ARMISTICE T I:
Huge Peace Conference to Asse
in 30 Days; Exact Place
Undetermined
(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
London, Nov. 12.- (1:28 A. M
The former German crown prinm
reported to have been shot, accor
to an Amsterdam dispatch to
Central News. Details are lackin
Washington, Nov. 11. - Signir

Germany wa
President

A comprehensive summary of
the armistice terms signed by
the German government may be
found on page four of this is-

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