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October 04, 1918 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

ESERYVICE

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ENT REQUISITION'
'ER WIRE GIVEN AS
CAUSE

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No more telephones for new sub-
scribers is the edict issued by Post-
master-General Burleson. This order,
known officially as post office order 1,
931, forbids the installation of any
new phones either in residences or
business houses.
Government requisition of the en-
tire output of twisted pair copper clad
wire, which is the drop wire used
exclusively In connecting cable boxes
to the telephones, is given as the
cause. This wire is used extensively
in France to keep the rapidly advanc-
ing front line in touch with head-
quarters.
At present the government order al-
lows only three exceptions. First,
telephones may be placed in a house
or a building if it is already wired;
second, new phones may be installed
in buildings used by government em-
ployees; third, doctors, dentists, and
nurses may be given new service.
Postmaster-General Burleson's or-
der is primarily for the purpose of
conserving labor. In accordance with
this purpose no other kinds of wire
will be employed in place of the cop-
per-clad wire. Even though iron wire
could be utilized, the necessity for
uniform equipment throughout the
country will eliminate its use.
The Michigan State telphone com-
pany of Ann Arbor, has been hard hit
because of the scarcity of operators
and linemen. Nevertheless, the com-
pany has continued to perfect and ex-
tend its cables and equipment. Its
switch boards, installed just last year,
cen accommodate all the after-the-war
business which will arise when the ban
on the phones will be lifted. Untilf
then, the. company says that war ser-
vice must supersede private service.
FOOTBALL COACH DESCRIBES E
DAYS OF CHASING OCHE
Davenport, Ia., Oct. 5.-Description
of his experiences in one of the recent
offensives on'the western battle front
in which American divisions distin-
guished themselves is contained in a
letter received -from George W. Jones,
former football coach at St. Ambrose'
college and now a second lieutenant
with the 102nd Field Artillery, A. E. F.
Prior to the war Lieut. Jones had a
reputation among smal college foot-
ball coaches as the originator of open
football tactics of a novel nature, both
with regard to offense and attack. He
was one of the first mentors to adopt
the forward pass.
In his letter Lieut. Jones said:
"This is a corking division and did
wonderful work in the big drive. I
got up just in time totsee the end of
i. I passed through the villages you
have been reading about and in some
of them not a single house has es-
caped shell fire. The Germans had
evacuated only a day or two before
and all sorts of material lay about
with numberless dead heroes and
some unburied Boches.
"I had a wonderful view of the bat-
tle one night. Seated on a high irdge
at the edge of a wood one could look
across the valley and see flashes and
hear the rumbling of the cannon while
their shells whined over head. Every-
thing was brilliantly lighted by flares
and rockets. It was like having a
grandstand seat and having the battle
staged for your particular benefit.
"This division has been in for six]
months and only a few days ago we
got a relief. Coming back here to our
billets was not summer stroll, for
travel had to be by night on jammed
roads in mud and incessant rain.
Everybody was worn out and many
of the horses had to be cut loose and
shot or left by the road side in the
hope that a few hours rest would put
them on their feet again. Chasing the
Bosche has been a trying experience

for both men and beasts. It was work,
night and day, and the wonder is that
they stood it so well. A few days of
rest here has worked- wonders, but
our armies need a little more rest be-
fore returning to active service. The

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Boches are heavy fighters but our
boys are giving them more than they
can stand.
"This division has been compliment-
ed both by its officers and those of
the French high command. The ar-
tillery has been doing brilliant work
and the doughboys are fighting fools.
I am mighty glad I was sent from the
rear where I was detailed for so long
because being back there is like be-
ing on the sidelines in uniform at a
football game. Of course, someone
must stand on the sidelines but it is
lot more consoling to be in the game."
Jrichigan Technic
flay ie Su sp*ended
War is effecting the Michigan Tech-
nic, the engineering college publica-
tion to such an extent that it is prob-
able that the paper will suspend pub-
lication. An issue is being prepared
for this month, however, and if
enough interest is shown by students
in putting out the paper, it may con-
tinue throughout the year.
William Babbitt, '19E, the managing
editor, will do all in his power to as-
sure the continued publication, but for
the present he is engaged in getting
out an issue to appear the end of the
month. The scarcity of men is ac-
credited to the fact that almost all of
the men in the engineering college are
in the S. A. T. C.
GOVERNMENT ESTABLISHES
FIXED PRICES FOR SHOES'
Washington, Oct. 3. - Better shoes
for less money will be obtainable
through an agreement between the
War Industries Board and the shoe in-
dustry which establishes three fixed
price groups for shoes. Shoes will be
standardized as to quality and style
at prices ranging from $3 to $12 for
men and women, grouped as follows:
Class A, from $9 to $12; Class B, $6
to $8.50, and Class C. $3 to $5.50.
Cutting of shoes under the new
scale will begin Oct. 15. First deliv-
eries will be made from 30 to 60 days'
later. Present stocks may be sold at
prevailing prices, but the agreed price
on the new shoes will be maintained
through inspection by state councils of,
defense and other government agen-
cies. Retailers will be required to sign
a pledge and to display the new price
scale. Failure to do so will result in
supplies being cut off.

NO STUDENTS IN GUARD
HOUSE, SAY OFFICIAS

No Arrests Have Been Made; K.
Assignments Not Punish-
ment

P.

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* * * * * * * * * * *
Gargoyle Issues Call *
The Gargoyle, campus humor *
publication, issues a call today *
for artists and writers, men or *
women. The first number is to be *
the "Private Number." The edi-'*
tor will be in his office on the *
second floor of the Ann Arbor *
Pressbuilding from1 to 3 o'clock *
in the afternoon. Manuscripts and *
art material may be addressed to *
the editor of the Gargoyle. *
* * * * * * * * * * *

B-A-VOLUNTEER B-A-VOLUNTEER

/AJESTCT Hmo
Sons0 3 od ontly
Daily 2:00, 3:30, 7, 8:80 Good Piotures.

I tl

B-A-VOLUNTEER

sa

A report which circulated around
the campus this morning that five S.
A. T. C. men spent last night in the
guard house has been found untrue.
The guard house which started in
Ann Arbor on June 15 has seen very
limited service. At no time but once
has the guard house held more than
three men. The occasion for the ex-
ceptional ease was found in a little
poker game. At this time sevral men
were sentenced to the guard house for
some time.
There has been a popular impres-
sion that any one assigned to kitchen
police duty was there because of some
misdemeanor. This idea should be
erased as soon as possible from the
minds of everyone. Each and every
man is required to spend some time
at this particular duty. Kitchen po-
lice is only considered a punishment
when performed for an extended pe-
riod of +time.
GERMANS GET SOME BOMBS
VIA THE AIR FROM ALLIES
London, Oct. 3.- The British air
ministry issues the story of a neutral,
returned from Germany with informa-
tion of the effects of British air raids
over the Rhine provinces, particularly
on Frankfort.
The central part of the Frankfort
Main station was so damaged by bombs
trains have not- been able to enter
and are operated from hastily con-
structed platforms. Frankfort is in a
state of nervous excitement. At the
least warning people retire to cellars.
As to the normal effect, the neutral
says he heard nothing but the most de-
pressing talk of present conditions in
Germany and the prospects of further
attacks from the air.
GOMPERS VISITS YANKEES;
IS RECEIVED BY KING ALBERT
Paris, Oct. 3. - Samuel Gompers
president of the American Federation
of Labor, visited the American front
in France yesterday. After his visit
he left here for Italy. Gompers wsa re-
ceived yesterday by King Albert. He
visited the Belgian front during the
day and expressed admiration for the
morale and ardor of the Belgian
troops.
Sorority Rushing Rules Strict
Inter-Sorority rules governing
rushing are rigid this year with a
view to food conservation. The num-
ber of dinners is limited to five and
luncheons to four. Conservation of
sugar, nuts and candy is urged. At
evening festivities only fresh fruit
may be served. The number of girls
is less this year but more upper
classmen are entering the University.
You will always find satisfaction by
tadveritsing ii- the Daily.--Adv.

Today and Tomorrow
Enid
Bennett

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Ypsilanti 2(oa d
Nearly Completed
The road commissioners say that
the Detroit-Ypsilanti road is nearly
completed, plenty of material is on
hand and Uncle Sam is not going to
stop its construction. The commission-
ers and engineers are busy getting
the roads fixed up before the snow
falls.
Rumors Unfounded
There were some rumors that the
government would stop the construc-
tion of roads for the present, but they
are unfounded.
Chief interest is manifested in the
Detroit-Ypsilanti road, which is pro-
gressing rapidly. When finished, it
will be almost three miles in length,
of solid concrete,'18 feet wide, and
in a road-bed 24 feet wide. It is ex-
pected the road will be completed this
season.
In addition to this the county is
building two miles of road west of Ann
Arbor following the car line along
what is know as the Territorial road.
This road is to be based with cement
and have a top coating of asphalt.
It also is to be 18 feet wide in a 24
foot road-bed. If all goes well it will
be finished in about six weeks.
16 Miles of Road Built}
About 16 miles of gravel road is
being laid in different sections about
the county. Two miles of the Dexter
road is now completed, and the one
mile along Whitmore lake is nearly
so. Also two .of the five-mile Pontiac
road are nearing completion, two miles
on the Salem, three on the Packard,
and two on the Chicago road are part-
ly finished.
It is not likely that more roads will
be started this year, as the commis-
sioners are finding it difficult to get
teams and men.
Most of the work has been done on
contract, the chief contractors being:
Renick and Smith, of Finley, on Pon-
tiac road; W. B. Chalmers, on Grand
Rapids, on Jackson avenue road; Ottis
Cement Construction company, of De-
troit, on the Michigan avenue road,
and Johnson and company on the
Whitmore Lake road.
Dean Bates Back in Law School
Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
department has returned after his
year of absence. Dean Bates received
a year's leave from the University for
the school year of 1917-18 and spent
that time at . Harvard University,
where he taught and studied. He has
returned and is again in charge of the
Law School.

IN
A Dese rt Woo'in
He Thought She Was!
She Thought He Was !
:nd They Both Thought Wrong
A Delightful Story A Series of Complicated Situations
SUNDAY
CECIL B. DeMILLE'S
Til i Come Beck to You"
With BRYANT WASHBURN

a

B-A-VOLUNTEER B-A-VOLUNTEER B-A-VOLUNTEER

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

- AT ammmmm,

I SHEEHAN'S
ARMY AND NAVY BOOK STORE

Mtusic Notes
Arrangements are being made by
Mr. Charles E. Sink, of the School of
Music, to shift all of the pre-festival
concerts to Saturday nights in order
that members of the students' army
training corps can attend.
The public sale of all pre-festival
concert course tickets will be held at
8:00 o'clock Saturday morning at Hill
auditorium. Tickets for the Caruso
concert alone will be on sale Octo-
ber 12.

summer to Lieut. Thomas
'18.

R

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FRATERNITY NOTICE

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All secretaries of fraternities *
please send the address of their *
present chapter location to The '
Daily as soon as possible. A com- *
plete list will be run within a few *
days. C

P * * * * * * * C *
*IMPORTANT NOTICE

*

Lea ve CopyL Copy
at LASSIFat
Quarrys ad Students'
VDelta ATSE TSupply Store
A D E RT fS N G

WANTED
WANTED-Students Laundry to do at
Home. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Phone 2218.
LOST

FOR SALE
FOR SALE-Or rent very cheap an
upright piano. Apply 630 Haven
Ave., or call 1644-R.
FOR SALE- A drawing set. Phone
2357-M.

* Women and men unider
Dr. A. A. Stanley, who has worked * age or physically unfit for
unsparingly for several years in ar-*ary orpicarlyuntefor
ranging, classifying, and hanging the * tions on the business and edi
instruments of the Stearns musical I staffs of The Michigan Daily
collection in Hill auditorium, has com- * portunities for promotion ar
pleted his task and an elaborate de- rcellent. Report in the afte
scriptive catalogue of approximately * at the Press Building on May
15,000 different instruments of all * street.
types is now in press. The catalogue *treet. * * * * '
is authoritative and useful in the
study of the evolution and develop- A warm welcome and perfe
ment of our present standard musical vice at Wahr's University Bo
devices. -Adv.
Miss Frances Hamilton, of the piano Preserve your Michigan tra
department, was married during the Subscribe now for the -Daily,

draft
mil-
posi-
torial
. Op-
e ex-
rnoon
.ynard
0 *

ect,
oks

- Book containing eight War
ngs Stamps. Reward. Phone

N--Z.

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