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November 08, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-08

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c r frigan

:4Iat

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI!
SERVICE

GER

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN,

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1918.

PRICE THREE

I

I

A

ION MAlKS WHIRLWIND.
SRN, KEY Of DEFENSES;
TS COMMUNICATION LINES

II

War bulin

(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 7. - American
ES troops entered the historic city of Se-
dan at 4' o'clock yesterday afternoon;

S. A. T. C. WILL NOT
CEASE TRAINING
No word has been received tfrom
Washington concerning the disposi-
tion of the S. A. T. C. in case of cessa-
tion of hostilities. Men will continue
to be sent to officers' training camps
until orders to the.contrary arrive,
according to Sergeant-major Fischer,
last night.
H He said that the government will.
see that no person- or firm with whom
contracts- have- been made will suf-
fer financial loss in case the S. A. T.
C. is disbanded.
CITY AND, CAMPU'S HOLD
BIh PEACE CELEBRATION
ARMY AND NAVY MEN MARCH TN
PARALDE WIME BAND PLAYS
"VICTORS"

:f . . S

eported in his com-
ling. All that por-
west of the river

the
was

Pa

vov. 7 (10:20 P. M.),-With
asing speed the French
a forcing the Germans back
e, and all the -rest of the
ere the French are fighting,
to'the war office*announce
y. An advance of 10-miles
made since yesterday.,
gton, Nov. 7. - Complete and
ation of the peoples of the
editerranean countries from
ssion of the''Turks. and the'

BRITISH MISSION
LEAVES FOR CHICAGO
The members of-the British educa-
tional mission who were the guests
of the University during the last two
days, were very favorably impressed
by the educational, as well as the mili-
tary work carried on here. At a con-
ference of the mission and the Uni-
versity officials held yesterday morn-
ing in the University club, plans for
the close co-operation between the
American and British educational in-
stitutions were discussed.
Although no attempt was made at
the conference to come to a definite
conclusion, no doubt, as a result of
their mission more American students
will attend the British universities
and, in time, the British students will
come to this country and take ad-
vantage of the great professional and
research work which is being carried
on in our universities. The members
of the mission firmly believe this ex-
change of scholars and professors may
be brought about.
The mission left at 2:30 o'clock yes-
terday afternopn for Chicago, where
the members will attend the meeting of,
state universities. The extended" visit
of the mission will last throughout
December.
YOSTMEN PREPARED TO
AVENGE DEFET OF '05
THE WOLVERINES TO LEAVE FOR
f -' TTT ;NIGHT.
TRAIN
They leave on the 10:42 train to-
night,cheaded straight for Chicago.
Coach Yost and his squad of 34
toughened grid men are ready for the
big fray, and the only thing that
stands between them and the big con-
test is the distance between Chicago
and Ann Arbor.

eat Britain and Franee.
neemnent is made in a
mfltauetoeday by-the
sy by direction of the
n conjunction with the
ment..

KAISER'S DELEGATION ENTERS ALIE1
LINES IN FRANCE UNDER WHITE FlgMTOOIg'CTE NWLA4

The news which came into the Daily
oflice yesterday aftefnoon to the effect
that peace had been declared and that
the war was over was flashed around
the city to all the factories and the
whistles began to blow and bells be-
gan to ring. Almost before the whis-
tles had stopped blowing, crowds be-
gan to gather on State street, each
newcomer with the same inquiry as
to the cause of all the racket. There
was excitement enough before the
truth was found out and the extras
arrifed but whe4 they did-it was a
scene to rival the crowd that came up
State street after"the biggest victory
that Michigan ever won.
The ' S. A. T. C. headquarters' called
up the Daily office to inquire as to the
authenticity of the report and when it
was found to be true, the authorities,
at the. suggestion of Coach 'Yost, im-
mediately ordered the different com-
panies out and the band was called
into service.. The hour of the Daily
extra happened to coincide with the
drill hour of the S. A. T., C. and the
parade assumed enormous and well-
ordered proportions in a very few min-

i*
t"
t"
3
3
t
3
3
n
r
K
1
I'

£y - --
n, famous as a fortress int
-P~r4,sian war, and as!
ne Qf the present German 1
eat, is partly in the hands
.erican troops, and with its f
nish all the dreams of the G
;o fall hehind the line of t
Meuse and hold a footing
soil west of the Luxembu
Also, by the capture ofk
e lateral lines of communi
ith the great German fortr(
, are cut or dominated by t
the Americans, and thus re
inavailablefor. enemy use..
French Dominate Hirson
the west of St. Quentin to t
the Meuse, theFrench ha
rward, liberating many tow
lages. Since Wednesday th
etgrated a depth of 10 mil
standing rain and mud, and
countswere still pressing fc

-It THEATERS REOPEN
DOORS TOMORROW
,ind
After a cessation of business. for
over two weeks, the.theaters will-re-
ich open Saturday afternoon to resume
the their tasks of satisfying the movie
uum fans. The absence of the screen has
tin-.
red been sorely missed during the epidem-
ic and. the. people' Will: welcome the
the lifting of the ban.
the R. W.Tippitt, manager of4he Majes-
ine tic theater, says that approximately
of $5,000 has been lost by movie pro-
fall prietors of Ann Arbor while the ban
er- has closed their theaters. All halls
the and .theaters have been thoroughly
on renovated -'and fumigated during the
urg last few days and Dr. J. A. Wessinger,
Se- health officer, says that people should
ca- not fear to attend any public gather-
ess ings after Saturday morning,' as all
the possible' precautions have been re-
en- garded in handling the epidemic and
he feels that all danger is well out
of -the way.

he
ins
ey
es,
at
or-

REQUEST HOME PRODUCTS
DINNERS FOB THANKSGIVING
Washington, Nov. 7.-The food ad-
ministration has asked that hotels,
restaurants, and other eating places
save transportation by serving only
locally produced food on. Thanks-
giving day. 'The apepal was issued
for householders to 'observe the same
rule.

Report Affirmed
23y United Press
Reports that the war is ended have
been verilied by.United Press officials.'
The Associated Press denies the truth,
of the statement..,.
The United Press received a cable-
gram direct from Paris yesterday aft-
ernoon stating that the Germans had
signed the document which ended the
war. This dispatch was signed by
the president of the entire United
Press, Roy W. Howard, who at pres-
ent is in charge of the United Press
organization in France. The signa-
ture of William Philip Simms, chief
of the Paris bureau, was also affixed
to the message. The United Press
Midwest bureau headquarters at Chi-
cago late last night declared that the
dispatch was absolitely authoritative
and true.
The Associated Press, however, de-
nies that the armistice has been sign-
ed, although it admits that the firing
on the western front ceased at 3'
'o'clock French time, or 9 o'clock yes-
terday morning, Central Standard
time. Another dispatch claims that
the American forces seized Sedan at
6:30 o'clock.
The International News service ver--
ified the statement that the German
delegates are within the lines of the
Allies.
That there is some truth in the re-
port seems probable in the light of
the News at hand. It cannot be de-
cisively stated that the war is ended,
but indications point to that conclu-
sion.
Dispatches Conflict
The Associated Press dispatch yes-
terday afternoon said: "Navy cable
censors reported today that an unof-
ficial message had come through from
abroad announcing that the Germans
had signed the armistice terms deliv-
ered by Marshal Foch. No authority
was given for the statement. It was
assumed, however, that the German
envoys had been conducted through
the French lines. some time during the
day." Another of its dispatches said:
"It was officially announced at the
state department that the Germans
had not signed armistice terms." An-
other merely states that the foreign
:office had had no confirmation of the
report. A. fourth stated that the
German emissaries would arrive at
the headquarters of Marshal Foch last
night.
The United Press stands behind its
cablegram without any retraction or
qualification regardless of the Asso-
ciated Press' denial. The United
Press wire to Detroit was taken over
by the government after the transmis-
sion of the cablegram, it is reported.
No additional news was received from
Chicago last night.
(Continued on Page Six)

(Continued on Page Six)

utes.
Band Plays "The Victors"
It seemed as though the entire pop-
ulation of Ann Arbor was gathered in
the small block between Williams
street and North University avenue
on State -street. The parade started
with the band playing "The Victors"
and then the different companies fol-
lowed in their order with the officers
in command leading them. As the
parade proceeded dawn State street
toward Liberty, it gathered more en-
thusiasts and when it raeched Main
street it was about Etght blocks long.
The Ann Arbor high school unit fell
in line behind the S. A. T. C.
Tom Lovell Speaks
The majority of the people who,
were not in 'the parade remained on
State street and soon the sidewalks
,were crowded with citizens,' faculty
men, and students, all in, a wild clam-
or for more issues of the extra. In
the meanwhile, Dr. Tom Lovell, the
famous Ann Arbor poet, entertained
tie crowd from the curb until some
thoughtful person hauled him to the
rock of 1862 at the corner of the cam-
pus and from this platform, the poet
and songster gave a prolonged address
and then followed it by his song,
"Good-bye; My Sweetheart."
The: different -manufacturing com-
panies closed their shops and all the
classes on the campus were dismissed
as soon as the news reached the pro-
fessora. The - University- fire .alarm
siren kept up a continual din and that,
together withthe noise" of horns,
newsboys, and the belated naval unit
men who had been down on Ferry
field having their' photographs taken,
but who came up State street on dou-
ble quick orders with a mighty "lo-
comotive," made the famous street the
scene of the wildest excitement that
it has ever witnessed.
As the parade marched along the
(Continued on Page Six) l

Light Workout -
With but a light workout yesterday
and nothing more than signal prac-
tice scheduled for this afternoon, the
Michigan heroes will be in the finest
condition for the contest tomorrow.
There is but one thing that is worry-
ing Michigan fans, and that is the all
night ride that- is ahead of the cham-
pions of the Wolverine cause.:
For 13 years the contest has been
waited for and prepared for by Coach
Yost. With the wonderful practice
showing of the Wolverines and the
encouraging war news of yesterday,
Coach Yost wore a smile that out-
shone any of previous days.
Steketee, the star toe artist, will be
one of the big mainstays of Michi-
gan's 'tem. With his 60 yard punts,
a great deal of 'headway will be
made against Stagg's Maroon team.
Steketee's Work to Count
It is expected that the freshman,
who is by far one of the best kickers
that has ever been seen in Ann Ar-
bor, will be one of the most promi-
nent figures in the game. Coach Yost
is depending on him for winning
back the championship of the west.
Brand new uniforms will be given
the Varsity men today, and the flash
across Stagg field tomorrow after-
noon of 'the Maize and Blue sweaters
will mean large gains for the Wol-
verines. Every Varsity man now has
a permanent number which has been
sewed on the back of his sweater that
he may be recognized in the fray. Be-
ginning with Goetz as number one
down to Hadden, number 34, it is
positive that every number will court,
in the fight..
Alumni to Be There
With thousands of alumni already
on their way to the Windy City to
see the contest and with many more
headed that way, a delegation from the
University itself will go. Despite the
fact that army regulations will not
permit the S. A. T. C. men to leave the
city, at least a carload of Michigan'
rooters will be on their way to wit-
ness the contest. .

LONDON RECEIVES NO OFF(
WORD AT 0:80 O'CLOCK,
GREENWICH TIE
SECRETARY LANSING
ISSUES FLAT DEN
German Plenipotentlaries to Mee
10 o'Clock on Chimiay-Guis
Sector Thursday
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 7.-Just be
midnight the American goveru
was informed by cable from I
that the German armistice envoys
approached the French lines and
to arrive for their meeting with I
shal Foch between 8 and 10 o'c
tonight Paris time.
Secretary Lansing issued this e
ing the following statement:
"The report that the armistice -
Germany has been signed is not I
When it reached the departmen
state an inquiry was at once dispa
ed to Paris. At 2 o'clock this a
noon a telegram In reply tthe
the department was received
Paris. It stated that the aril
had not yet been signed and that
German representatives would
meet Marshal Foch until 5 p.m, P
time, or 12 noon, Washington th
The report spread through
country and gathered momentum
til demonstrations approaching
teria ruled in many cities. Busi
was suspended, schools closed, w
stles blew, bells tolled, prayers o
ed in church, parading citizens J
bed the streets, and the scenes, u
ally attended on New Year's eve
election night, were intensified.
When it was 6:30 o'clock tonigh
,London the foreign office pronoui
unfounded the rumor that'the ari
tice had been signed, and at that i
no word had been rceived in
British capitol that the German d
gation had crossed the French liu
EXAMS GIVEN FOR
HEAVY ARTILLE!
*Examinations have been given iv
in the last few days to those
who wish to be sent to try for c
missions in heavy artillery. These
aminations have been in mathema
but entrance to this officers sel
does not necessitate an enginee
education, although such is of coi
an advantage. This is shown by
fact that some of the best rect
have been made by lawyers and b
ness men. It does, however, re
a good head and a thorough wor
knowledge of trigonometry and
arithms.
The coast artillery branch of
army has been furnishing men to
all guns from the six inch up to
largest railway guns now in use
France. To furnish the requ:
number of officers for this work,
three months' course of training ii
operation at the Coast Artill
School, Fort Monroe, Virginia. ' ;
cers in charge of this school b
been on the Western Front and kI
what should be taught. Each m
instructors are sent back from
forces in France to keep the 'w
up to the standard demanded by G
eral Pershing. The land target ra
is located at Camp Eustis near I
Monroe so that each graduating cI
can receive practical instruction
firing before going across seas.

[B DAILYl

ADS AGAIN

eI

cadtime this
gan Daily led all
rs in the public-
hal - news. The
tra put on the
'clock yesterday
newspaper in the
he public of the
stilities and the
ermany. It was
ly the,. Detroit
ily was the only
.enaw cqunty to
unt of-the sign-
tice. More than
the extra were
.nn Arbor, Ypsi-
Ld outlying com-

War Cost to Be Less Than Expected
Washington, Nov. 7.-The war ex-
penditures, which were estimated at
$23,000,000,000 for this fiscal year, are
not as great as expected. Expenses
for October were $1,664,862,000 in-
cluding $489,100,000 in . loans to the
Allies. The total was only a little
more than that of ,last July." The to-'
tal war cost to date, however, is cal-
culated at $20,561,000,000.
Carl Roser, '19M, Leaves School
Carl E. Roser, '19M, has been com-
pelled to leave school by reason of
ill health. He will finish his senior
year next fall with the present junior
class.

War Department Continues Projects
Washington, Nov. 7.- The war de-
partment today authorized the con-
struction board today to proceed with
18 war projects, costing '$18,000,000.
The largest appropriations include
$7,500,000 for enlargement of Camp
Grant, Ill., and $4,815,000 for con-
struction at Camp Custer.
CLASSES NOT DISMISSEDI
Classes will be held the same
as ever regardless of the peace
celebration. President Harry B.
Hutchins stated emphatically
last nighht that the University
will not excuse the students from
classes no matter what news is
received.

f

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