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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 07, 1918 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wiasil Clark
Speak lriday
sil Clark, a Kentucky wo-
ve in war work both here
id, will speak at 8 o'clock
Hill auditorium. Previous
sband's death in 1914, Mrs.
d in Liverpool, London. She
lived in Germany and four
Brussels.
rar was declared Mrs. Clark
house as a Red Cross sta-
devoted her time to war
hile living in Belgium she
German army march into
where she lived for two
ler German rule. She will
everity of this military dis-
rageard to the treatment of
nal friend, Edith Cavell.
ark has been interested in
izing of 50,000 lace makers
m and in different loan and
A. drives. She has worked
food conservation commis-
er the direction of Mr.

AR BULLETINS

(By' the Associated Press)
With"the American army on the
Sedan front, Nov. 6.-,(9:15 P. M.)-
Reports from the center of the Amer-
ican line are to the effect that the
town of Mouzon is on fire, and that
part of Sedan is burning.
The division fighting in the center
today captuured 20 "77's," 200 ma-
chine guns, 15 trench mortars, 200,000
rounds of ammunition, and much oth-
er material.
Amsterdam, Nov. 6.--Entente troops,
in agreement with the Austro-Hun-
garian command, have crossed the
Austro-Hungarian lines at several
points to offer passage to troops which
have not yet fled, according to a Vien-
na dispatch. This action was taken
to prevent a further disbandment of
troops and prevent them transport-
ed home in groups.
London, Nov. 6.- The British are
continuing their advance to the east
of Mormal forest, according to Field
Marshal Haig's report tonight, and
have occupied numerous villages and
the railroad junction of Aulnoye.

Paris, Nov. 6.--The operations by
the French today netted one of the
greatest advances yet made, measur-
ing more than six miles at various
points. The important towns of Ver-
vins, Montcornet, and Rethel were oc-
cupied, and progress was made far be-
yond these places, the war office an-
nounced tonight.
Amsterdam, Nov. 6.-The American
council and several British prisoners
have been killed by the bombardment
of Charleroi, southwest of Namur, in
Belgium according to Berlin dis-
patches received here.
Cercle Francas Elects President
The Cercle Francais held a business
meeting at the Cercle rooms Monday
evening4 Hope Ferguson, '19, was
elected president. for this year. It is'
customary to elect officers for the
coming year at a spring meeting, and
those elected last spring were Presi-
dent G. Byrne, '19; vice-president, Ken-
netha Berry, '19; treasurer, Floyd
Buell, '19; secretary, Marjorie Spring-
er, '20. As Byrne left college to enter
the service a new president was elect-
ed to fill the vacancy,.

EPIDEMIC CHECKED
AMONG U. S. FORCES
Washington, Nov. 6.-In his weekly
review of military conditions in the
several theaters of war, General Pey-
ton C. March, chief of the general
staff, sketched the great Allied vic-
tories and explained their meaning.
He said that the number of American
troops overseas exceeded 2,000,000,
and made known that the influenza
epidemic among the troops sent to
Europe appeared to be definitely
checked. The proportion of influ-
enza cases among troops being land-
ed in Europe has beenreducedto al-
most negligible figures in some divi-
sions.
General March also disclosed the 10-
cation of several of the fighting units,
among which was mentioned the Rain-
bow division in action west of the
Meuse.

ONCE

BY TH

With a decided improvement of the
influenza epidemic, Dr. J. A. Wessing-
ar believes the disease is practically
conquered in this city. He says the
nature of it is cyclonic and it goes
as quickly as it comes. No deaths
or new cases of pneumonia have been
reported in the last two days and only

the people of Ann Arbor
ently expect a lifting of t
week-end, but this will
actly announced until
churches, theaters . and pt
are being fumigated and r
assure the public of absc
in attending them when
finally lifted.

A

the

Marching Shoes For Army And Ni
' TAN s I8
FOR °
THE
ARMY m
x ra l. ~ ..g~

II

To the west of the American sec-
tors the Germans, near Rethel, are
holding a bridgehead to protect their
retiring armies east and west. In do-
ing so they are forming a dangerous
salient, in which capture is likely
should the French break through.
Numerous crossings of the French
have been made on the Aisne. Alto-
gether the situation of the Germans is
critical.

n u, nnuttu iu E tnn t tr utnun mumunu uurf ui um t n imuu 1111111ii11itil

-M1e )Come of Snerginle"

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ARCADE OPENS SATURDAY
Sat., 9-Harry Morey' and Betty
Blythe in "The Green God," and Star
Comedy, "Shot in the Dumbwaiter."
Sun., Mon., 10-11-Tom Moore in
"Just for Tonight" and "Smiling Bill"
Parsons in "Birds of a Feather."
Tues., 12--Kitty Gordon in "Merely
Players" and Star Comedy, "House-
cleaning Horrors."
Wed., 13-Edith Storey in "The Si-
lent Woman" and Screen Telegram.
Thurs., Fri., 14-15-Norma Talmadge
in "The Safety Curtain," Christie Com-
edy, "Kids" and Official War Review.

i

Just received another large shipment of this wonde
fitting last which we especially recommend for At
and Navy men.
A shoe of generous width, allowing plenty of space for the
of the foot. That permits the foot to spread freely when wall
and in this sightly toe *very little member of the foot has ampler
to work in comfort.
PRICE $7.00 TO $9.00
Complete range of sizes.
Walk-Over Boot Shoj
115 S. Main St.
R. J. HOFFSTETTER, Prop. FITTING BY APPOINTR

_.__ _.. _ ...' YnOu ...

We Treat You Right

S. 4th Ave.

Phone 251

AT THE SUPPLY
ONLtYE STUDENTS' UPYSO

Everything a Student Needs I

1111 South University

Phone 1160-K

Opposite Engineering Arch

__

THE COUNCIL OF NATIONAL DEFENSE
requested stores throughout the country to encourage early
istmas Shopping-tp save fuel and extra labor entailed by
>ing stores open extra hours in December. We want to keep
waste down to a minimum. We have done everything
;ible toward this end by having
Jhristmas Stocks Ready Now!

PHONE
1701
DAILY
2:00
3:30
7:00
8 :30!

leslit.

DAILY
$:00
7:00
8:30

Opening Saturday

There

is everything possibe that 'any woman could

re for a gift.

Silk Stockings
Beaded Handbags \
Real Leather Purses
Dainty ,Georgette
Silk Nightgowns
Silk Camisoles

Organdie Neckwear
Odd Silk Neckties
Lovely Negligees
Blouses Lingerie Blouses
Italian Silk Underwear
Vanity Cases

Throughly Renovated
and Fumigated

FURS
there's a wonlderfully complete stock of everything.

rnglas

Prices are moderate and you know that Hutzel merchandise
reliable.

Main and Liberty Streets
Ann Arbor

A60P

Fairbanks

/

JUST RECEIVED

ttSay

Young Fellow"

CK TAR MIDDY BLOUSES

- - IN SERGE AND FLANNEL

OES

REPAIRED

U

WAIT

Van's Qusilir Shoe

0

11

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