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October 04, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

kTHER
COOLER
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ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

No.3.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1918.

PRICE THREE

SATURDAY FIAL
DAY 1FORLIBERTY
SLN VOLUNTEERS
S. A. T. C. MEN ARE URGED TO
SUBSCRIBE FOR
BONDS
CITY'S SUBSCRIPTION
SHORT OF QUOTA SET
All Banks Willing to Cooperate With
Purchasers of Fourth Issue
Bonds
The time for voluntary enlistment
in the Fourth Liberty Loan closes
Saturday night at 8 o'clock. All stu-
dents who have not yet come forward
must make their appearance at the
tent on the campus or at Newberry
Hall at the earliest possible date if
they wish to wear the badge of a vol-
unteer. Yesterday was the record
day so far for the fourth loan.
S. A. T. C. Men Can Help
"Tpere seems to be the pernicious
idea circulated among the S. A. T. C.
men," said Prof. J. B. Waite of the pub-
licity committee for the Liberty Loan,
yesterday, "that students who have en-
listed in the S. A. T. C. have done their
bit and are not expected to buy bonds.
These are just the men who are best
able to buy them for they have the
government sending them to school
and paying them besides. As a pure
matter of policy, a 4 per cent in-
vestment in bonds is the safest and
wisest investment possible. The stu-
dents cannot go to Detroit over the
week-end to spend their money, and
what else can they do with it, when
they are for the most part kept un-
der government supervision.
"These men who are in the S. A. T.
C. are men who would ordinarily go
to college, and besides being backed
by the government, they are backed
by folks at home. The men in the
regular army cantonments and abroad
.are investing freely and many of
them have dependents. The Liberty
bond is the easiest plan and best way
for the S. A. T. C. men to save. These
bonds do not have to be paid for until
January 30, and by .that time, the S.
A. T. C. will have received four
months salary. They could buy a $100
bond and have money left."
Totals of Second Loan
In the second loan, 1,072 men stu-
dents subscribed to the amount of
$98,400 and 309 women subscribed to
$31,850. There were 89 subscriptions
that averaged $538 and totalled $47,-
950. There were 286 one hundred dol-
lar subscriptions.
In the third loan 127 women sub-
scribed to the amount of $17,050 and
447 men subscribed to the amount of
$40,400.
The city, including the subscriptions
of the students, has not yet filled its
(Continued on Page Six)
INDUCTION PAPERS FOR 15 MEN
WAITING AT COURT HOUSE
Are you a member of the S. A. T.
C.? Not unless you have received your
induction papers. No man is a mem--
ber until he has turned his induction
papers over to his comianding officer
and been sworn in. The papers of the
following men are waiting to be
claimed at the Courthouse: Carl John
Thrun, Jerome Hittell Schurzer, Ar-

thur Lewis Eaton, Joseph Jaul Win-
chel, Douglas M. Teal, Reinold Erwin
Boes (Navy), Samuel P. Lockwood,
Evares Everett Winney, Nevin Charles
La Hins, Victor Paul Jones, Carl
Theodore Hogan, Laurence Elwin
Lausborough, Harold Thomas Augus-
tus, Alfred Adolph Fox, and John
James Hugan.
These men should call for the pa-
pers at once.l

RECOMPENSE NOT
ASKED BY WORKERS
The rumors circulating on and
about the campus that a student bar-
racks is in quarantine and that the
Collegiate alumnae are receiving com-
pensation for their services in the
Hostess House, are officially denied by
orders from the students' army train-
ing corps.
According to officials, an absolute
denial is made that the Hostess House
is making money from the student-
soldiers. The help do not receive pay
for their services. The women in
charge 'are doing patriotic work and'
ask for no recompense. The Univer-
sity furnishes the heat, light, and
building, the Y. M. C. A. keeps the
soldiers supplied with stationery and
the fraternities have lent their furni-
ture.
ENTENTE SMASH PAST
HINDENBURG LINE

LAW COURSES ARE
CHANGED BY WAR

Law

Department Offers
Inducements to the
S. A. T. C.

Special

MACHINE
TOLL;

GUNS EXACT DEATH
GERMAN RETREAT
CONTINUES

(By the Associated Press)
With the British Army on the St.
Quentin Sector, Oct. 3, 5:30 p. m. -
British troops smashed a large and
vital section of the Hindenberg line
between St. Quentin and Cambrai.
They have occupied many additional
towns and villages. Five Belgian pris-
oners and numerous guns have been
taken.
The battle was resumed at 6 o'clock
in the morning and continued through-
out the day. English and Australian
troops drove deep into the enemy de-
fensive. The ground over which the
British troops fought their way
against the inevitable swarms of ma-
chine guns was littered with German
dead.
The advance has reached a depth
of about five miles at its apex and, it
follows, that the principle Hindenberg
defensive here has been shattered. A
few hours may see the British all the
way on the other side of a great Ger-
man defensive system.
From the north comes most signifi-
cant news. The Germans, who were
gradually being left in a salient, have
begun a retreat on practically all the
Armentieres sector and appear to be
in full flight. British troops have en-
tered and are now pasing through
Lens.
Aubers Ridge, south of Armen-
tieres, has been taken and the British
are east of there. Indications are
now that the Germans have been forc-
ed to begin one of the war's greatest
retreats.
The troops cooperating with the
Belgians have taken villages near
Roulers after hard street fight-
ing. They have forced the Germans
well back and are still going. The
Germans must get'out of the territory
along the Belgian coast as far as Os-
tend if the advance here continues,
as it gives every sign of doing.
1)eaths from Influenza Are Increasing
Washington, Oct. 3.-Further spread
of Spanish influenza over the coun-
try and in army camps with an in-
creasing death rate was indicated to-
day in reports received by the pub-
lic health service and at the office of
the surgeon general of the army.
Due cases 'developing in army
camps totaled 12,004, making a total
since the epidemic began Sept. 13 of
113,737. Pneumonia cases total 8,575,
and deaths 2,479.
Publisher is Arrested as Slacker
Washington, Oct. 3.- The supreme
court in petitions filed today was ask-
ed to review judgments convicting
Maurice Sugar, publisher of the Mich-
igan Socialist, of failing to register
under the selective service act and at-
tempting through his newspaper to
induce others not to do so.

MILITARY AND INTERNATIONAL
, LAW TAUGHT IN FIRST TERM
Remaining Time May Be Devoted to
Purely Professional
Courses
The law school, with other depart-
ments of the University, has opened
its doors to members of the students'
army training corps and t the Naval
section. This step necessitates offer-
ing to members of the army training
corps a curriculum determined in cer-
tain respects by the War and Navy
departments. Students entering the
corps become members of the army
and are subject in all respects to or-
ders issued from the proper authori-
ties.
The law instruction will be con-
ducted by the faculty of the law school
and all questions of admission to the
school, standards of work, earning of
credits and graduation will be deter-
mined by the faculty as heretofore.
Special War Courses
The War department requires that
all students' in the law school who are
members of the S. A. T. C. shall take
courses during the first and second
quarters in military law and interna-
tional law, and during the first quarter
in war issues, and during the second
quarter in emergency legislation of
the war. The courses in international
law and military law will be conduct-
ed In a strictly professional manner,
and the course in military law will be
so developed as to make it the full
equivalent of the course in criminal
law and procedure.
. The course in military law includes
a study of the code for the army court
martial and covers both the substan-
tive and procedural law relating to the
subject. Students will be given in-
struction in the forms of orders and
other steps in the proceeding, and
courts martial will be organized some-
what as the practice court has been
organized in years past. Offenses'act-
ual or supposed will be tried before
this court. In addition the course will
cover the important general army o-
ders, opinions of the Judge Advocate
General, leading court decisions and
some of the best Law Review articles
on the subject.
Present Cases Studied
The course in international law will
be based upon the principles act-
ually decided by courts in this field,
(Continued on Page Six)
AMERICAN MOTORS WIN FAVOR
OF FOREGN GOVERNMENT
DeHaviland four airplanes with
Liberty motors manufactured in this
country compare favorably with the
best British and French makes, ac-
cording to a report received from
France by Major-general Kenley, chief
of military aeronautics. The report is
made by an officer who has just re-
turned from the front. He states that
the machines began to arrive in May
and have been coming ever since in In-
creasing numbers. Six weeks ago an
average of 18 planes was arriving
daily.
He states that some changes were
necessary at first but the later pro-
duction is said to be showing better
workmanship. M. Du Mesnil, the
French under-secretary of state for
aviation, has said that the French will
gladly take over every motor produced
which is not needed by the American
forces.
Hearings in the department of jus-
tice airplane investigation are now
being held and it is expected that the
report of Charles E. Hughes and At-
torney-General Gregory will be made
to President Wilson in about three
weeks.

U. S. TO REGULATE
CLOTHING PRICES
Washington, Oct. 3.-Prices and dis-
tribution of practically all articles of
wearing apparel are to be controlled
by the war industries board. This
was disclosed today by Chairman Bar-
uch of the board, in an address at a
special meeting of the retail drygoods
association.
Though no details of the plan have
been announced it is believed that
standard prices for clothing prob-
ably will be established by agree-
ment with manufacturers and retail-
ers.
INTERCOLLEGIATE GRIO
GAMES TO BE PLAYED

30

ONE CONTEST SCHEDULED
EACH SATURDAY IN
OCTOBER

FOR

Sweat, of either the honest or dis-
honest variety-it makes no difference
-dripped from every pore, as the S.
A. T. C. slave floundered to a "Halt"
at the side of one of the only girls he
ever loved.
"Wait," he panted, sensing war in
her glittering orbs, (he was taking
a course in map reading), "I'll explain,
you see it was this way; I scrubbed
floors all morning and then I had my
belogna and in the afternoon II car-
ried brooms around and had my bol-
ogna hash-O no, I'm standing it fine;
my only worry is: do they furnish you
with these gold shoulder bars or do
you buy them yourself? Sorry, Liz-
zie, gotta tear away now, my 30 min-
utes furlough is at an "end."
And he speeded away to his new
fraternity house.
YANKS SEE FINISH
AND FIGHT HARDER

Something About

Washington, Oct. 3.- Football for
the S. A. T. C. this fall was authorized
today by the war department commit-
tee on education and special training.
All men physically fit will be en-
couraged to take part in the sport.
Time for practice will be limited to
an hour and a half each day, and dur-
ing October inter-collegiate games
can be played only on Saturday, and
provided they do not require a longer
absence from the institution than from
"noon to taps." During November,
however, when is was suggested that
a pieked team be chosen to represent
each college, two trips will be permit-
ted, not to require a longer absence
from school than from "retreat" Fri-
day to "taps" Sunday.
Delegates Return
Chicago, Oct. 3.-Prof. Thomas E.
French, of Ohio State university, and
Avery Brundage, representing the
graduate managing committee of the
Western Intercollegiate Athletic as-
sociation, who were sent as delegates
of the "Big Ten" to obtain from the
war department at Washington a uni-
form ruling on football and' other in-
tercollegiate athletics, have returned
and are expected to make their re-
port today. The report will show that
portion of the original schedule of in-
tercollegiate sport is to be retained,
and what is to be the basis for athletic
competition for the remainder of the
war.
UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT
VARIES IN DEPARTMENTS

nute Leave

HUN ARMY STUBBORNLY GI
GROUND ON ENTIRE BAT-
TLE LINE
ALLIES REACH AISN
CANAL IN CHAMPAG
Enemy Offers Strong Resistance
Blows of Entente
Armies
(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
With the American army nort
west of Verdun, Oct. 3.-Exce
forethe slow but continued pi
gress in the Argonne forest tt
situation on the American front
unchanged. More prisoners a
guns have been taken, and the
is general activity of varying i
tensity on the whole of the se
tor.

With the American army at the
front, Oct. 3.-While the folks at home
in America and the other Allied coun-
tries are jubilant over the news ofj
the Bulgarian collapse the fact could
not arouse the same enthusiasm
among the hardy men of the first Am-
erican army holding back the desper-
ate counter-attacks of the Germans.
What the man who is caked with
mud, and soaked to the skin realizes1
most thoroughly is that he may be
dead before the dawn of a drizzly to-
morrow.
So far, the Bulgarian news has not
diminished the number of shells and
bullets turned on our men who are
stubbornly fighting and advancing,
northwest of Verdun. That is the Am-
erican soldier's immediate problem
and what concerns him, concerns the
home folks. Obviously the German
soldiers and civilians have not been
informed of the defection of their
eastern ally, but for the time being
the result appears to have stiffened
"America's war with German kaiser-'
ism and added to the determination
that the fight must go on until Ger-
many is whipped."
"Those who have been at the front
today realize that the fighting is as
deadly as ever," said a farsighted Am-
erican. "Military strategists forsee
much from the Bulgarian situation,
but in the trenches in which a real
American army after five days of
fighting in the coldest and wettest
weather of the season is opposing de-
sperate attacks, the fine points of di-
plomacy cannot be followed just now."
DISCUSSION OF PEACE BEGUN
IN AUSTRIAN DEPUTY CHAMBER
Vienna, via Basel, Oct. 3. - Discus-
sion of the government's declaration
and the question of peace was begun
yesterday in the Austrian chamber of
deputies. The Socialist deputies de-
manded peace on the following bases:
the nreatinn f la . I a' 'f natfinns nn

GERMANS EVACUATE ARHMENTIER
AND LENS; AUSTRIANS BRETREATIl
FROMA9DRIATIC SEA TO LAKE OCHI

(By the Associated Press)
Lens, the height of the great c
region in northern France, and Al
entieres, almost equally important
a manufacturing center, has b
evacuated by the Germans; the G
man fortified positions between Ca
brai and St. Quentin has been defin
ly smashed,and the Austro-Hung
ians in Albania, forsaken by tb
former allies the Bulgarians, are
full retreat from the Adriatic Sea
Lake Ochvida
Germans Stubbornly Yield Groun
Of the reconquering of invaded I
glum and the progress of the Fre'
and Franco-American forces resp
tively north of Rheims and eastw
in Champagne to the vicinity of V
dun, the line remains the same.
Germans are slowly, but surely be
forced to give ground and their v
defenses daily -continue to be ea
into, notwithstanding strong res
ance.
In Belgium, Flanders the Belg
French and British troops are keel
up their eastward progress in tl
endeavors to compel the Germans
give up Osted and Zeebrugge, til
naval bases on the North sea.
Roulers, the important rail'
junction has been entered by the I
gians, and at Hooglede, to the no
King Albert's men are virtually u
the Roulers-Ostend-Bruges ral
To the south Menin and Courtrai
seriously menanced.
Allies Take Armentleres
Across the border in France
capture of Armdntieres brings I
within striking distance and the e'
uation of Lens places Douai and
the territory between Arras and Na
is in the hands of the British.'
To the south, from Cambrai to
Quentin, the German resistance is
strong, but nevertheless the Bri'
Americans and French have smn
ed the old Hindenberg positions
materially advanced their lines.
quehart, north of St. Quentin, w
the Germans in a violent counter
tack recaptured from the British V
nesday, again has been taken by I
Marshal Haig's men.
Enemy Offers Resistance
Northwest of Hhelms the Gern

Although the enrollment in the Uni-
versity is as yet incomplete, a fairly
good idea of what it will finally be#
may be obtained from the figures now
obtainable. The enrollment in the
literary college is approximately 5,-
000. Two thousand eight hundred and
sixty students have been enrolled in
the army branch of the S. A. T. C.,
and four hundred forty-eight students
have registered in the navy.
The effect of the war on the Law
school may be realized by the fact
that the enrollment is at present less
than one fourth of the enrollment at
this time last year. The number of
women studying law this year is
smaller by one half of that of last
year. The classes will be continued,
however, and the faculty will prob-
ably remain complete, with the ex-
ception of Prof. Evans Holbrook. who
has been granted a year's leave of
absence.
Union to Hold Open House
There will be an open house at 3
o'clock Sunday afternoon in the lobby
of the new Michigan Union building.
Every student and all members of the
faculty are invited. -Professor Harri-
son will direct the community singing
and Ike Fischer's orchestra will furn-
ish the music. A. S. Lyndon will pro-
vide a machine to throw the words of
the songs on the screen. There will
be a six minute address.

are offering strong resistance, bu
economic warfare; no annexations; 'French have captured Cornicy
the restoration of Serbia, Montenegro reached the Aisne canal between
and Belgium; revision of the treaties cezreux and Laneuzillette, on a
of Budharest and Brest; the settle- of more than 15 miles.
ment of the eastern questions on the In Champagne the French hav
basis of nationalities; the regulation larged their gains from the r
of the Polish question by the Polish north of Somme-Py to the we
constituents; and the establishment fringes of the Argonne forest, tE
of autonomy for each nation in Aus- 'prisoners and inflicting heavy ca
tria-Hungary. ties on the enemy.
Mstanek, a Czech deputy, caused an In their retreat from Albania
uproar in the chamber by violently Austro-Hunga'ians everywhere
attacking Germany, and declaring that in flight before the Italians, bu:
the only means of reaching peace was towns and depots behind them. ]
to accept President Wilson's 14 numbers of prisoners and quan
points. of war material have been captur

CARUSO-and Four Other Great

Concert

SEASON

TICKETS

ON

SALE

AT

HILL

AUDITORIUf

BOX OFFICE, SATURDAY, OCTOBER

5,

8 A. M.-$4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6.

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