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November 06, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-06

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UDY; PROBABLY
SHOWERS

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WI]
SEARVCE

X. No. 31 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1918. PRICE THREE

PEACE TERMS READY FOR HUN;
EP NCEAU GREESI WITH WILSON

LY FOR
E ARMIES
UND

ALL

) PUBLISH
REPLY SOON

Acceptance
ader of

Autocracy

shington, Nov. 5.-Marshal Foch
lhe terms of armistice for Ger-
and awaits application for them
e German military command in
eld.
government at Berlin is so in-
d in a note, which Secretary
ng handed to Minister Sulzer,
vitzerland, tonight, announcing
the Allies have declared their
gness to make peace on the prin-.
enunicated by President Wilson.
note now is on the, tables. In 24
it should be in German hands,
48 hours the world may know
ier the immediate 'end of the
s at hand.
rms Not Yet For Publication
lication of details of the armis-
erms still are withheld. They
ot be made known until the Ger-
have rejected or accepted them.
the details are in doubt and no
uestions that acceptance means
surrender.
statement has been authorized
he drastic conditionstunder
Austria passed out of the war
Aen followed closely, and in ans-
> queries for further information'
Is said tonight that the state-
of Premier Clemenceau, cabled
Paris by the Associated Press,
he story:
ch Premier Agrees with Wilson
e German terms," said Cleman-
"are what President Wilson him-
ecommended to us for the se-
of our troops, the maintenance
r superiority, and the disarma-
of the enemy in so far as it is
ary to prevent a resumption of

"The Knockout "Is
Inlander' Feature
Not to be outlone by the Gargoyle,
the Inlander has incorporated an an-
tographed photograph of Major Ralph
H. Durkee in its issue which appears
upon the campus today. " Every army
man will want a copy of this picture,"
declares the editorial staff.
The story, "The Knockout," by John
E. McManis, '21, of Co. 15, is of a new
type for the, campus literary publi-
cation, reminding the reader of 0.
Henry. Mr. Julio del Toro, who has
made a particular study of the con-
ditions in south and central America,
has prepared an article on Latin
America and its relation to the world
war..
Those fond of poetry will find some-
thing to their tastes in two bits of
verse by Mr. M. C. Wier of the rhetoric
department, and H. L. Conrad. Prep-1
arations are already being made for
the Christmas number of the In-
lander and a special appeal Is being
made to S. A. T. C. men to contribute
things containing the atmosphere of
the barracks. All copy for this num-
ber must be in by Nov. 15.
WOMEN OF BRITISH MISSION'
TO BE DORMITORY GUESTS
Two of the members of the Brit-
ish foreign mission are women. Miss
Caroline Spurgeon,, professor, of Eng-
lish literature, Bedford college, Uni-
versity of London, will be the guest
of honor at Martha Cook building,
and Miss Rose Sidgwick, lecturer on
ancient history, University of Bir-
mingham, will be guest of honor at
Newberry residence. Miss Grace
Greenwood will entertain at dinner
Wednesday evening for both the
guests, and the girls from Newberry,
residence and a number. of collegiate
alumnae will be guests at Martha
Cook.-'.
It is hoped that Miss Spurgeon and
Miss Sidgwick will speak on educa-
tional topics. On Thursday morning,
they will be shown around the cam-
pus, and will be entertained at lunch-
eon by Dean M. B. Jordan and Mrs.
John R. Effinger.
STUDENT COUNCIL TO MEET
TO DISCUSS CLASS ELECTIONS

FLU DECREASES; BAN
NOT YET LIFTED
Although the ban has not been lift-
ed yet, the influenza epidemic is rap-
idly lessening. But six new cases and
one death have been reported within
24 hours and only one new case of
pneumonia.
A report was circulated throughout
the city that the state quarantine
would soon be removed but telegraph-
ic advice from Lansing to the city.
health officer denied this. The tele-
gram :received by Doctor Wessinger
read, "Closing ban not yet lifted." The
doctor said that he hoped that no one
would try to open before an order per-
mitting such an action had been is-
sued for such a violation of the order
would necessitate the prosecution of
the guilty party.
The rumor that the -ban was lifted
today was branded as false and an-
other that public places would be
opened before Saturday noon could
not be substantiated.

UNITED WAR WORK
STARTS CAMPAIGN
At a meeting of representatives of
non-military men at Lane hall yes-
terday Milner Ballard, '20H, was elect-
ed chairman and plans were discussed
for the united war work campaign to
reach the men not in the barracks.
The other members of the committee
are William H. Dorrance, '19E; Robert
McCandless, '22M; Charles R. Osius,
Jr., '20; Abraham Elkind, '20E; and
Oscar P. Lambert, '18L. Booths will
probably be placed and those men!
whose addresses are in the hands of
the committee, will be canvassed at
the end of the two day voluntary cam-
paign if the quota is not reached.
EDUCATIONAL MISSION
ARRIES IN ANN ARBOR

NEWBERRY LEADING FORD BY 15,000;
MICHENER BEATS BEAKES- IN COUNTY
SUFFRAGE AMENDMENT LIKELY TOM

GERMANS REEL UNDER
THRUSTSOF ETENTE
YANKS' ARTILLERY THREATENS
GERMAN COMMUNICATION
LINE
(By the Associated Press)
The German armies in Belgium: and
France are being defeated. Nowhere
are they able to stay the. attacks of the
Allied forces. Ground is being' given
over wide areas in Belgium, and in
France from the Belgian border to the
east of the Meuse river.
Hun Reels Under Allied Blows
The British and Belgians in Flan-
ders have dug deeply into enemy-held
territory and the enemy is reeling un-
der the assaults. From Valenciennes
to the Aisne river the British and
French are driving the enemy, in what
seems utter disorder, toward his bor-
der. Greater, perhaps, than all the
other strokes, is that of the Ameri-
cans and French in the Meuse river
region, north and northwest- =of Ver-
dun, where fast strides are being made
northward over a wide fr.ont, threaten-
ing to cut off the enemy's retreat and
bring about a defeat of the Germans
on the battlefield.
From Belgium to the Meuse the
Germans are in jeopardy. Especially
critical is the situation for.them in
the great sack from Belgium to the
north of Rheims, for, with the advance
of the Americans and the French
northward, and with the important
lines of communication under fire, it

MEMBERS OF BRITISH MISSION
TO BE ENTERTAINED BY
FACULTY
The British educational mission
which was to have attended the con-
vocation exercises of the University
will arrive in Ann Arbor this after-
noon. The convocation has been post-
poned on account of the ban on all
public meetings but the members of
the mission will be entertained by
various members of the University
faculty.
Honorary degrees will be conferred
at the meeting of the mission and the
faculties, which will take place at 4
o'clock this afternoon in Alumni Mem-
orial hall. Besides the conferring of
degrees it is probable that an inform-
al reception will take place as the
wives of faculty members have been
asked to attend. None but the mem-
bers of the mission and the faculty
members and their wives will be al-
lowed to be present.
In order that it be possible for all
members of the different faculties to
be at the gathering all regular Uni-
versity work will be suspended at
3:30 o'clock.
The students in the army and naval
units will be in formation to honor
the mission. The military band has-
been asked to play and probably there
will be a parade of the student com-
panies.
The' convocation exercises which
were planned for today have been
postponed indefinitely and will possi-
bly take place on the day that the
French mission pays the University
a visit, if the ban on meetings has
been removed.
During their stay in Ann Arbor the
members of the mission will be the
guests of members of the faculty who
have extended the hospitality of their
residences to them.
SHIFTING LIGHT PROVES TO BE
SIGNAL CORPS SEARCHLIGHT
Quite a bit of interest was aroused
last night by suddenly shifting lights
coming apparently from nowhere.
Were the military authorities search-
ing the 'skys for Boche planes? No,
it was simply the embryo signal corps
men practicing with a new search-
light which had been erected during
the day on the tower of the Michigan
Union building.

War Ilulletins
(By the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 5.-The British arm-
les in the sector between the
Sombre and the Scheldt rivers
have defeated, in a battle which
began Monday, 25 German divis-
ions, Field Marshal Haig reports
from headquarters tonight. In
addition to capturing many vil-
lages today, the British have pass-
the great Mormal forest.
(In the battle of Verdun only
20 1-2 divisions were used by
the Germans.)
With the Amerian armies in
the Meuse secton, Nov. 5.-(11
P. M.)-The American forces have
captured Liny-Dezant-Dun and
Milly-Dezan-Dun, east of the
Meuse river. They are also oc-
cupying the hills on the east bank
of the river despite a stiff ma-
chine gun resistance by the Ger-
mans. In their advance today the
Americans reached points 'within
five miles of one of Germany's
main lines of communication be-
tween Metz, Mezieres, Hirson, and
points north.
Washington, Nov. 5.-Troops of
the American first army, which
today forced a crossing to the east
bank of the Meuse at Brieulls
and Cloary-le-Petit, are develop-
Ing a new line on the heights be-
tween those places, General Per-
shing reports in his communique.
The west banks of the river, as
liar north as Poully, Is now in
American hands.
Pride Goeth - It
WasA Bad hump
He was an acting sergeant in the
S. A. T. C. and "acting" is right.
Yesterday he took his men down to
Ferry field to rehearse there the an-
tics and ethics of war. They "left ob-
liqued" and "inclined to the _right"
in true form all the way down State.
By the time the platoon was safely
within the brick walls, the sergeant
was so proud of it and of himself that
he could scarcely see over his chest.
There chanced to be several godlings,
otherwise known as superior officers,
on the field and they were no less
observing than most s. o.'s. The
sergeant has his braves "right front
into line," "on left into line," "right
by squads" and other fawncy chorus
capers. Everything went well, unitl-a
girl sauntered through the gates. She
was a sweet girl and she wandered
in nonchalantly with some gob on
shore leave and she apparently had
no desire to be disturbing. But it
chanced that she was one of the only
girls the sergeant ever loved. At this
juncture the first rank of the platoon
was an approximate foot from the
east wall.
Did the sergeant say "To the rear,
march," or "By the right flank,
march," or some other neat and kippy
command?
He did not. As the wall advanced
to meet his men, in a final effort to
divert disaster, he piped, "Hey, stop
and turn around, will you?"
In the next formation, the one-time
acting sergeant was number 3, rear
ranks.
Residence Damaged Slightly By Fire
A fire slightly damaged the roof
of Leo Santule's residence at 424 Hill
street at 6 o'clock last night. The
fire was started by sparks from the
chimney. When the fire department
arrived it had not gained much head-

way and was speedily extinguished.

REPUBLICAN TICKET AHE
THROUGHOUT
STATE
G. 0. P. HEADS CLAIM
MAJORITY IN CONGRI
Ohio Stays Wet; Cox Defeats All
ponents in Run For Gov-
ernor
BULLETIN
(By the Associated Press)
Detroit, Nov. 5.-Retarns tabuh
at 11:80 tonight from one-fourth
the precincts in Michigan gave LI
Commander Truman H. Newber
lead of approximately 15,000 over I
ry Ford.
Republicans effected an overwhe
ing landslide in Washtenaw cot
and all over the state, according
the latest reports received at a
hour.
Sleeper, Republican, got 3,585,
Bailey's 2,311 in Washtenaw count;
the race for governor.
Ann Arbor and the county adder
the big Republican lead by giv
Newberry 1,107 over Ford. The
mer polled 3,699 to Ford's 2,682.
Practically the entire Republi
ticket led by the same or larger plu
ities.
Woman suffrage was given 959 vc
in favor, and 1,349 against in Wa
tenaw county. Ann Arbor maintal
its big lead in favor of suffrage, !
ing 1,217 for and 555 against
amendment.
Michener deposed Beakes for r
resentative from the local districi
the U. S. house of representatives 1
vote of 3,760 to 2,642. This was
of the most warmly contested e
tions in the state, Beakes having 1
the office since 1912.
Dickinson was given 3,841 aga
Gardiner's 2,200 for lieutenant-g
ernor.
Vaughan polled 3.904 as secret
of state. Masselink, Democrat,
2,102.
Groesbeck led Baker, Fuller
Jakeway, and Odell led Powell
similar pluralities.
George W. Millen was uncontes
,from Ann Arbor for senator in
state legislature. Charles A. Sink v
over William S. Mills for state rej
sentative.
Pack was elected sheriff; Sm
county clerk; Gruner, county treas
er; Townsend register of deeds; Fa
ner, prosecuting attorney; Laird
Cole, circuit court, commissions
Deake, drain commissioner; Bur
field and Atchison, coroners;
Coons, county surveyor. Only
Democrats were elected in the cou
and these were uncontested.
This is probably the biggest la
slide that has been seen in this c
trict for some years. Republic
literally swamped their opponent

ecretary Lansing's note gives the
of what has been going on in the
nentous conferences at Paris be-
en Colonel House and the Allied
niers. It quotes a "memorandum
bservations" by the Allied govern-
ts, on the President's correspond-
3 with German authorities, dis-
ing the approval of the President's
:e program with reservation of
dom of action in the peace con-
nce in the moot question of free-
of the seas and a pacific state-
t that by restoration is meant that
many must make compensation for
damage done to civilian popula-
s and their property "by land, by
and from the air. '
Hun Must Pay for ,Damage
his last requirement, in which
ident Wilson concurs, means
nan payment for towns and cities
royed and country side devasta-
for ships sunk by submarines
raiders. It means German pay-
t of damages to the families and
mdants of civilians killed or car-
off in violation of the rules of
he spokesmen of Germany have
pted the President's terms; now
must accept the Allied qualifica-
i if they want to stop the advance
lie Allied and American armies.
guarantee that final peace eon-
ns will be dictated under inter-
ation of principles by the victors
out undue argument by the van-
hed is provided by the armistice

A meeting of the student council I seems probable that large numbers of

was held yesterday afternoon, only
four members being present. It was
found that nine members are in school
and a meeting is to be held at 4:45
o'clock Friday afternoon in the old
Michigan Union building. At the
meeting Friday arrangements will be
made for holding class elections and
other business of the student coun-
cil will be discussed.
NAVAL UNIT IN UNIFORM FOR
BRITISH MISSION PARADE
Most of the men in the naval unit
will be in uniform today in the par-
ade held in honor of the British edu-
cational mission because of the fact
150 additional uniforms have been is-
sued during the past two days.
Engineering Classes May Be Changed
Although it has been rumored that
a few changes would be made in some
of the classes in the engineering col-
lege during the coming week, such
changes will probably not go into ef-
fect until a week from the coming
Monday. Then certain changes in
classification may be made in order
to fit in better with the military or-
ganization.

them are destined to be cut off and
forced to surrender.
Likewise the crossing of the Meuse
river by the Americans places in per-
il the large enemy forces in Lorraine
south of Metz. There are indications
that operations, with a view to over-
whelming the enemy in this region,
are in the making. The German ofi-
cial communication Tuesday announc-
ed that the Americans had made "par-
tial thrusts" west of the Moselle river,
which runs through Metz.
Allies Capture Many Towns
Large numbers of towns have been
reclaimed by the Allied troops
throughout the 'entire fighting zone.
Many thousands of Germans have been
made prisoners, and large quantities
of guns and stores have been captur-
ed. In addition the enemy has suf-
fered large losses in men killed or
wounded.
Judging the situation from the mil-
itary map the crisis on the battle
field is at hand. The Germans have
come to the realization that the Foch
military machine is the master of the
German machine. Therefore they are
giving ground every-where before it-
seeking their border line in order to
prevent being crushed.

THE DAILY LEADS

The exclusive Associated
Press wire The Michigan
Daily handling election returns
was the only service in Ann Ar-
bor last night. By means of
stereopticon bulletins at The
Daily offices andtmegaphone an-
nouncements at the County
building, The Daily informed
the citizens of Ann Arbor of the
complete election returns for all
districts.
The Daily was the first paperj
in Washtenaw county to report
the progress of the election.

(By the Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 5.-At midnigh
congressional election returns
just a little more than half in an
figures then at hand showed a
of eight seats in the house, at
least three in the senate, for the
publicans.
After that hour Acting Chai:
Cummings of the Democratic nat
committee had issued a state
claiming Democratic gains in
houses.
Chairman Hayes, of the Repub
national committee, had not is
a statement but said that he felt
the Republicans would control
house.
The turnovers came in New Y
(Continued on Page Four)

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