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November 05, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-05

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DAY AND N]
SERI~

>. 30.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1918.

PRICE

'' Georgette C r ep e
,,,.,,., Dmims Union Door

I

1

L

ESENTATIVES HOLD MEET-
ING AT LANE
HALL
TA FOR STUDENTS
LIVE S E T AT $40,000
ames Taylor Makes Stirring
Appeal in Behalf of
Organizations
s for the United War Work
ign which will begin Monday,
1, were begun Sunday after-
when the committees for or-
ig the student campaign met in
all and decided upon a quota of
for the students. Representa-
ere sent by every barracks. The
ts' Christian Association, the
ot in the S. A. T. C., the Wom-
ague, the Y. W. C. A. and the
C. A. all were represented.
James Taylor, veteran of the
rar, and now doing Y. M. C. A.
in the British army, spoke to
sembly, inspiring them with
portance of the work the seven
ations are doing abroad and on
le, and impressing the fact that
hostilities were to end tomor-
us drive for funds would be all
re necessary as a means of af-
the soldiers and sailors amuse-
nd constructive activity in their
hours. He urged against the
te let-down of community in-
in the men if the war were to
suddenly. "The best way to
ur sympathy is with our dol-

Blam!
Another Michigan tradition has gone
by the boards! For those who cannot
hark back that far, the fact is that the
new Union was never to have the light
footsteps of milady pass over the
threshold. The air was never to be
changed from the aroma of bygone
smokes to the faint fragrance of Dfer
Kiss. The old bar of the Orient which
was placed there for a soft drink
counter was never to have Georgette
crepe elbows grace its polished sur-
face. The foot rail which has oft sup-
ported a 12EE shoe was never des-
tined to support a French heeled
3AAA.
Recently-in fact, very recently-
this was all shattered when a bevy
(that word is enough to shatter the,
tradition alone) of co-eds invaded the
new building and explored the place
to their girlish hearts' content. The
bar was an object of especial interest
and hard cider was dispensed to
quench the feminine thirst.
Then the exploration began. They
may remember the details o: the
building long enough to whisper it in
awe to their friends when they gather
to gos-pardon-discuss the place of
masculine recreation.
The collitch may not be what it
once was in a few years. Men may
be grouped in dorms, have 10 o'clock
hours, and all sich. Thus has the kai-
ser wrought havoc at Ann Arbor.
INFLUENZA TOTAL 117;
59 MEN IN SERVICE DiE
EPIDEMIC PRACTICALLY OVER;'
ONLY FOUR CASES
REPORTED

QUESTIONS BOTHER-
INQUIRIES SHOULD BE TAKEN
TO HOSTESS HOUSE IN
MEMORIAL HALL
Owing to the number of unnecessary
questions which have been asked at
personnel headquarters concerning
the S. A. T. C. men, the following an-
nouncement has been given out:
"It has become necessary to bring
before the campus in general and those
desirous of personal information about
S. A. T. C. in particular, that the pur-
pose of the Hostess House is to an-
swer questions about S. A. T. C. nien
concerning their location or health.
"The personnel. office at S. A. T. C.
headquarters deals withathe clerical
work pertaining to military matters.
It keeps the records of the S. A. T.
C. men. To it is entrusted the task of
assigniing men to barracks. It sees
that the men receive their proper se-
rial numbers from their local draft
boards. It makes up the pay rolls
and takes care of the monthly re-
turns. In short, this office is kept ex-
tremely busy with the administrative
end of the military work at head-
quarters, and hence it is unreasonable
to require its officials to interrupt
their work by answering questions;
concerning the location of the vari-j
ous men.
Long Distance Calls Annoying
"The telephone system at headquar-
ters is limited and is rushed to the
utmost in handling official business.
Therefore it is plain that long dis-i
tance calls are particularly annoying1
in interrupting the transaction of im-
portant business.
"The office aims to co-operate with
the parents and friends of all-S. A. T.

AUSTRIANS SURRENDER UNCNIINLYTO ALIE!
ENTENTE CAPTURES 300,000 MEN, 5'1OOO GUNS IN I1
HUN ARISSLOWLY DSNTGAT NWESTERN.

I

Faculty To Honor
lritish fission
Convocation exercises are post-
poned indefinitely and, in compliance
with the state ban on the holding of
public meetings, will not be held to-
morrow afternoon, at was announced
last week. University authorities say
it is possible that these exercises will
be held on the day the French mission
visits the University. The program,
which has already been prepared, is
not to be altered.
For the entertainment of the Brit-
ish educational mission, which was to
be present at the convocation exer-
cises, and in recognition of their vis-
it, exercises, including the conferring
of honorary degrees, will be held at
4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in the
Alumni Memorial hall. All regular
University work will be suspended at
3:30 o'clock in order to permit the
members of the several faculties to
attend the meeting. The mission and
the faculties will assemble ii Univer-
sity hall. and at 4 o'clock will march
to the Memorial hall. The wives of
members of the faculties are invited
to attend. The gdneral public will
not be admitted.
A military aspect will be given the
affair when the army and navy organ-
izations assemble in formations along
the walks between the two buildings.
The military band is asked to play
during the procession.
RETURN FLU MASKS.
HEALTH PHYSICIAN

U. S. AVIATORS DOWN 30 PLANES, d BALLOONS, AND BO14
MEDY; NORTHERN ITALIAN CWTIES AGAIN FLY TR
COLORED FLAGS; FRITZ' HOLD WEAKENS
AMERICANS PE4RCOLATE ENEMY LINES, 12 M
SOUTH OF SEDAN; COMMUNI2ATIONS IN D
Prince Maximilian Says "New German Democracy" Due in Cen
Boche Ally Gives Up Railroads and Land to Victorious All
Armies; America to Send Germany Terms Today
(By- the Associated Press)
London, Nov. 4.-Breaking deeply into enemy positions on
front today the British captured more than 2,000 prisoners, and
said a report issued by Field Marshal Haig tonight.

Washington, Nov. 4.-Three hundred thoi
less than 5,000 guns had been captured by tI
fore the armistice went into effect at 3 o'cloc
dispatch from Rome.

Austrian
;orious It

Paris, Nov. 4.-The first French army, attacking in cony
British on the Sombre-Oise canal,have captured severs
oners, and have advanced more than two miles, the war
tonight. f

YANKS DOWN PLANES
With the American army northwest
of Verdun, Nov. 4.-(11:30 P. M.)-
The American troops late this after-
noon advanced their lines both east
and west occupying Laneuville, di-
rectly opposite Stenay, and taking Les
Grandres Armorses, on the left.
In aerial fighting today, between
enemy and American machines, 30
German airplanes were brought down
and three balloons destroyed. Seven
American planes are missing.
Montmedy was bombed by a squad-
ron of 54 planes which were protected
by 100 pursuit planes this afternoon.
Excellent results were attained on the
heavy enemy tralic .behind the lines.

secretary of the day, and took the
names of the representatives from the
barracks. Nominations for chairman
were made to Mr. Francis Stifler, and
Abraham Gornetzky, '19, was chosen.
Matters from that time on were com-
pletely in the hands of the students.
Discussion was called for, to deter-
mine. the quota for the campus. It
was brought to the attention of all,
that . other colleges were fixing quo-
tas that averaged $10 a head. Last
year's quota of $25,000 was easily
(Continued on Page Four)
-SPECIAL NOTICE TO NEM-.
BERS OF THE SEVERAL
FACULTIES
All regular University work
will be suspended at 3:30 o'clock
tomorrow afternoon when the
the members of the several fac-
ulties will assemble in Univer-
sity hall where they will prepare
to attend the exercises to be
given at the Alumni Memorial
hall in recognition of the visit
of the British educational miss-
ion. Wives of the members of
the faculties are requested to at-
tend, entering at the south door
of the Memorial building. Ac-
ademic costume will be worn and
for those who wish it, academic
dress is provided by the Univer-t
sity. Arrangements for this dress
should be made at the store of
George J. Moe, 711 North Uni-
versity avenue.
HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President.

Up to date there have been IT
deaths from influenza and pneumonia
in the city since the disease broke out
here five weeks ago. Fifty-nine of-
these deaths were among S. A. T. C.
and naval unit men. The remaining
58 occurred among the civilian popu-
lation.
Influenza as an epidemic is over in
this city, is the belief of both city and
military health authorities. Only two
deaths occurred as a result of influ-
enza since last Saturday and but four
new cases have been discovered.
University Hospital Nurse Dies
The two deaths which resulted
from influenza since Saturday occur-
red early Sunday morning. Mrs. Ber-
tha Wagner, of 1202 Packard road, and
Miss Alice Spencer, a nurse in the
training class of the University hos-
pital, are the deceased..
Miss Spencer had been in training
at the hospital for over a year. Her
home was in Battleboro, Vt. Her
mother arrived here in time to see
her before her death.
No New Cases In S. A. T. C.
There have been no deaths and no
new cdses in the S. A. T. C. in the
past four or five days. Many men are
being discharged from the infirmaries
every day., Few serious cases of
pneumonia still remain and only one
convalescent patient has had a relapse
since Saturday. ,
The public schools opened today
after an 11 day recess with only three
teachers absent: Physicians examined
the pupils but found none with any'
traces of influenza. Dr. J. A. Wessin-
ger said yesterday that theaters and
other public gathering places would
probably be allowed to open Saturday.
(Continued on Page Four)'

C. men, but it requests the public to
use the Hostess House as much as
possible. The house has complete rec-
ords of- the housing of the members of-
the S. A. T. C. and their disposition
when sick, and can answer all ques-
tions about the men. It is particularly-
requested, that long distance calls be
Mpade to the Hostess House, No. 2520.
Military Neiessity
"When the above facts are known
and appreciated, it will. readily be
seen that in requesting the public to
use the Hostess House at Alumni hall
instead of the S. A. T. C. headquarters
as a bureau of information, much val-
uable time will be saved for all con-
cerned.
"This is .a military necessity and is
not an attempt by S. A. T." C. head-
quarters to shift its work on the
Hostess House, the object of which is
to do such work.
Signed:
PERSONNEL HEADQUARTERS."
BIBLE MEETINGS HELD SUN-
DAY AT S. A. T. C. BARRACKS
Twenty Bible discussion groups met
at the various barracks Sunday morn-
ing with a total attendance o more
than 600. The largest attendance at
any meeting was 88 at Barracks 2.
Meetings were held immediately aft-
er breakfast and continued for half
an hour. The men are studying "The.
Soldier's Spirit," by George Stewart.
The classes were conducted by mem-
bers of the faculty, business men, stu-
dent pastors, ministers, and Y. M. C.
A. secretaries.
It is hoped that the membership
may be increased to 1,000 next Sun-
day. Attendance is purely voluntary,
and membership is confined to the S.
A. T. C. and the naval unit.

All students are emphatically re-
quested to comply with the order
asking the face masks to be returned.
"It is of the utmost importance that

these masks be returned," states the Summary of War Activities.
University health physician, "for they The German armies in Belgium and
are needed badly by the nurses and France are the only ones left which are
those who are working in the various under attack, and they are being sore-
hospitals. The gauze is hard to get ly tried. In the Italian theater, the
and the masks, though simple in Austro-Hugarians utterly crushed,
looks, are difficult to make. It makes having lost thousands of men killed
no difference if the masks are dirty or and 300,000 taken prisoners, are stand.
soiled, for they will be sterilized and ing bewildered before the victorious
washed before using." French, Italian, British, American, and
The understanding when the masks Czecho-Slovak armies. Respite from
were given out was that they should further punishment was given
be returned when asked for by the them Monday afternoon. Northern
hospitals. They are of no value to Italy again is Italian, and Trent, Tri-
the student now that the order for est, and other places, which Italians
wearing them has been withdrawn; but always have claimed as their own, are
they are invaluable to the people 'n' dominated by the Italians and fly the
the hospitals. If the mask is almost tri-color of the kingdom.
worn out, it will be used for other Italians Control Adriatic Coast
medical purposes. Nothing will be Almost all of the Adriatic coast line
wasted providing the student returns now is in the hands of the Italians
the mask. and Albania is all but cleared of the
Receptacles will be put in the vari- defeated Austro-Hungarians. Likewise
ous buildings on the campus and in- eastern Serbia is freed of the enemy,
to these the masks should be thrown and a few days more doubtless will
see the remainder of the straggling
Senior Medies Elect Glass Officers, '- ,-,-----

AUSTRIA INVADED
-Amsterdam, Nov. 4.-Pr
millian, the German chan(
cussing reform in the Vos
tung says:
"God be praised for a rea
revolution. The old regime
good. I am firmly convin
new German democracy so
living at peace with our ;
ponents, in order to be ab
plete the task of remod(
many."
Washington, Nov. 4.-Ai
gary, the last and most poN
of Germany, passed out
world war today under tel
solute surrender.
Not only have the armed
the once powerful Austrian
down their arms and peace
tated by the United States, b
ritory is open to invasion
lies.
Austria Peacefully Takes
The terms, which stoppe
torious advance of the Itali
were accepted by the Aust
mander-in-chief in the fie
name of the Vienna govern
their execution isguarant
thorough beating already a
ed which made the army i
organized, fleeing horde.
In addition to all of th
precautions, the Austrians
pelled to retire from a wid
(Continued on Page 1
SPECIAL NOTICE IN RI
TO WEARING OF MA
As the medical author
the University advise t
influenza epidemic is ni
der control, the weai
masks in classes may be
tinued. It is desired l
service and the hospitals -
masks so far as possible
turned to receptacles th
be provided for them on d
parts of the campus.
HARRY B. HUTM]
Pry

I

The class officers of the present se-
nior medical class are: President, C.
E. Badgely; vice-president, C. E.
Sherwood; secretary, Cecil Corley;
treasurer, Norman C. Bender. Of the
125 students who enrolled three years
ago there remain two women and 541
men; 48 of the men are enlisted in
the medical enlisted reserve corps.
Whether the class will be compelled to
take a year's interne work after grad-
uation remains with Surgeon-General
Darnell to decide.

Austro-Hungarians making their way
out of the western part of the king-
dom across the Save river into their
own territory. As for Bulgaria .and
Turkey they no more are menacing.
Over a front of 30 miles in north-
western France, Field Marshal Haig's
armies have delivered a mighty blow
against the Germans and torn into
their positions over wide fronts, cap-
turing important strategic points of
the enemy line and taking more than
10,000 prisoners. An advance of more
(Continued on Page Four)

ALL STUDENTS MUST CALL FOR M. A. C. RESERVED SEAT APPLICATION CARDS.
Athletic Association Offices, Ann Arbor Press Building, before 6 P. M. Saturday, Nov. 9.
S. A. T. C. students must show physical examination blanks and all others their athletic books
obtain M. A. C. application cards.
S. A. T.- C. students will be admitted to the Syracuse game, Saturday, November 16, on presentat
at gate of physical examination blanks.

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