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November 02, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-02

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*PRESS
DAY AN(D NIGHT
SERVICE

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1918.

PRICE THREE -

__ .__

I BELGRE DEFENSES;
OS OVER ENTIRE NAVY;

EMY OFF MOUNTAINS
Lid 's Off! Army
lien Get Mtovies

URTLESI

Army and navy men of good health
TE will not find it necessary to spend
this week end in Ypsilanti, if the
ting plans of the War Camp community;
service work out as anticipated.
A program of movies and music
will be given in Hill auditorium to-
day and tomorrow, beginning at 2
erb- o'clock this afternoon and continuing
iter until 10 o'clock in the evening. On
erb- Sunday a change of pictures will be
is- made and the auditorium will be
and open from 10 o'clock in the morning
ard until 6 o'clock in the evening.
t of Only army and navy men of good
oc- health will be admitted, while civil-
ians will not be allowed to attend. The
consent of the military and civil au-
thorities has been obtained by those
ac- in charge.

W.G. SPRAGUE, EX-'15,
KILLED IN A C T IO N
Ensign William Griffith Sprague, ex-
'15, formerly a student in the engineer-
ing college, has been killed while
serving with the United States fly-
ing corps. He was killed Oct. 25, on
the island of 1le Tudy, off the coast of
France.
Ensign Sprague attended the Uni-
versity for two years, then went to
Boston, -graduating from the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology. Lat-
er he became part-editor of the Am-
erican Boy magazine and a member of.
the Sprague Publishing company.
Ensign Sprague enlisted in New York
and sailed for France, July 13
INFLUENZADIES OUT IN
CITY AND ARMY CORPS
HEALTH OFFICERS TO PERMIT S.
A. T. C. ENTERTAINMENT IN
HILL AUDITORIUM
Influenza,. was the cause of four
deaths in the city yesterday but only
two new cases of the malady and two
of pneumonia cane. to light. The sit-,
uation is so encouraging that Dr. J.
A. Wessinger will permit the city'
schools to open Monday and the mili-
tary authorities have granted per-
mission to the S. A. T. C. men to be'
present at an entertainment to be
held at Hill auditorium today and to-
morrow.t
The last patients were- discharged
or transferred from Barbour gymna-
sium yesterday as only a few conva-.
lescerits remained. Men who had
slight attacks of influenza were cared
for there. It will no longer be used
as an infirmary.3

CONFERENCE
'18 SEASON

OPENS
TODAY

Chicago,Nov. 1.-With 14 teams in
action the football season for the'
western conferenee will officially open
tomorrow. Chicago, crippled by the
loss of several first string men, will
play Purdue at Lafayette, and I111-
nois will meet the University of Iowa
at Iowa City.
Three other conference teams will
also be on the field, but the games
will have no bearing on the confer-
ence championship. Indiana will face
Camp Taylor at Indianapolis, while
Wisconsin will have a service team
from Dallas, Tex., as its opponent.
Minnesota will be opposed by Carle-
ton college at St. Paula
SUBWAY; 88 KNOWN DEAD
FIRST DAY OF STRIKE BRINGS
DISASTER IN BROOKLYN
TUNNEL

BRITISH TAKE 49,OOO MEN IN OCTOBEI
YANKS ATTACK GERMANS NEAR VERDI
ALLIES POUND :FOE AT VALENCIEN

When Sherman 's
Idea Fits Peace
Mon brave, the S. A. T. 0. warrior,
limped down Washtenaw with discon-
solate step and drooping head. He
was plainly worried; in fact he was
worried to dejection. He approached
the tree that grows in the middle of
-the walk. Head on, he met it; then
was the concentration of his indigo
hate manifested; he neglected even to
breathe a sotto voce "penouche." His'
eye, sweeping low along the pave-
ment, noticed a section of an old cord
tire and his expression unknotted
,perceptibly. The dull observer noted
the tire and the O. D.ed one and whis-
pered: "Ah! there is surely a girl at
the bottom of this affair."
But he was wrong.
By now, the student belligerent was
.talking loudly in his frenzy and what
he grumbled was this: "What'll they
do with us if they don't send us to
-cantonments; what'll they do with the
cantonments if they don't have any
more soldiers; we aren't students and
we can't be figters if there isn't go-
ing to be any more war. Oh, what'll
we do if they have peace NOW?"
And then as he passed the lost
cord, he sobbed, "Well, I'll make some
benevolent old maid a nice chauffeur
with all my two weeks' experience in
automobile mechanics."

CENTRAL POWERSi LOSE
TROOPS, 2,378 GUNS IN TI
MONTHS
SERBS FORCE ENEN
"TO AUSTRIAN BO
Belgians Gain Ground Toward
Franco-American TroopsI Hi
Southern Part of Line
(By the Associated Pre
WAR BULLETINS
London, Nov. L-- In the
three months the British fi~x
France have taken 172,659 p
ers and 2,878 guns from th
mans, according to an 4
communication received
Field Marshal Haig tonighi
During the month of 0
the British forces fighti
France captured 49,000 pri
and 925 guns.
With the Aemrican forces
west of Verdun, Nov. 1.--Gene
shing's forces attacked the
positions on this front today.
a dozen villages were capture(
than 3,000 prisoners were tak
The line, at 6 o'clock this
extended through the northe
of Bois-des-Loges to the easts
then well north of Aincrev:
Clary-le-Grand. Most of the
captured had been fortified
Germans.

ades Frolic At
St. Pete 's Party

|

an-
He
iad
t it

German wire-
by the British
. that, accord-
>clamation, the
vy has been
th Slav nation-

Ghosts, white-robed and spectral,
groaning and clanking, filled the cor-
ridors of Martha Cook building last
night at the annual Hallowe'en par-
ty. Shades .of long-deceased mortals,
given pass-out checks by St. Peter
for the evening, convened at th der-
mitory for a clammy get-together and
in tones ghastly and wavering they
did reminisce on their earthly follies.
After tottering along the dimlit
halls, they were ushered into the
sanctimonious presence of St. Peter
himself and his- -faithful-"accordion"
angel who was droning out celestial
melodies on a heavenly uke. St. Pete
whispered happy hints to the appari-
tions of the blissful reward which
waited them in the next room. So
sprightly gnomes led the feeble
ghosts to festive boards in the black
and cavernous banquet hall.
When the swaying ghouls had clank-
ed into their places, illumination was
produced by none other than the
yawning faces of Jack o' lanterns. In
spite of their emaciated and long-un-
nourished state, these particular. de--
parted souls did marvelously well on
the viands that were set before them,
in fact it was whispered about that
all gasped for a "re." So exhilirat-
ed were they by the sight and taste
of the nectar of crushed apples and
real pumpkin pie,- that they dissipat-
ed in the whirl of the dance, and ex-
ecuted fox-trots with surprising dex-
terity.
Thus they passed the fleeting hours
until St. Peter blew taps on his gold-
plated bugle and they -faded away to
the -regions on high (as far as the'
fourth floor, in fact) and laid away
their robes until another day of earth--K
ly gayety shall call them forth.

Convalescents at Union
Several men at the infirraries were
declared entirely recovered yesterday
and were sent to the special company,
barracked at the old Union building.
They will remain there a week with
only light drills and no strenuous
physical exercise before being as-
signed to their original companies.
A large number of men will be dis-,
charged from this company today.
Four Deaths Reported
- Two section B, S. A. T. C. men were
among those who died. They were:
Clyde Worth, of Onaway, and Wil-
liam McKinley, of Fenton.
The other two who died were: Miss
Lucile Emerson, a Junior nurse of the
University hospital training class,
and Christopher Sparling, of 91 Mary
street. Miss Emerson's home was in
Jackson.

New York, Nov. 1.-Eighty-five bod-
ies had been taken ,late tonight from
what is known as the Malbone street
"tunnel" on the Brighton Beach. line
of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit com-
pany where a five-car train running
at high- speed jumped the track on a
curve and struck the side wall with
such terrific force that the first car
was demolished and the others
"buckled" until they were jammed
against the roof of the tunnel.
The tragedy marked the first day of
a strike called by the company's mot-
ormen to enforce the reinstatement
of, 29 discharged. members of the
brotherhood of locomotive engineers
as ordered by the national war labor
board.
According to survivors the motor-
man evidently was unused to the
road, as' he was compelled to back-
up at one point when he had taken
the wrong switch. The train was
jammed with passengers as the strike
had resulted in a material reduction
in service and consequent delay.
Immediately after the crash the
wrecked cars burst into flames add-
ing to the terror of those who had es-
caped injury and increasing the peril
of those' pinned in the wreckage.

e the Austro-Hungarian
ke an expressed reserve
:ual ownership of the

is no ob-
of the na-
e of the war
the council.
Danube fio-
ucted to re-

y of Italian Activities
the new smashes of the.
enh,' and Americans in
d France have been mark-
sful in the carrying out of
al program or ridding
I Belgium soil of the in-
.s still the Italian theater
he eyes of the world are
[nternal strife in. Germany
a-Hungary, and continued
rom the dual monarchy for
e and a cessation of hos-
e received scan notice,
ared with the impression
)nderful drive of the Ital-
eir Allies against the Aus-
ans has made upon the
arcs.
reats From Mountabis
re the enemy is being de-
aly. In the Alpine region,
natural barriers had act-
ions of defense, the ene-
,s beer broken , at salient
the foe compelled to seek
streat to further mountain
On the plains the retro-

Gee! Snow!

It snowed yesterday, in addition to
numerous other things. It was what
is sometimes called sugar snow, the
kind that melts as you look at it, like
Sweet Alice, Ben Bolt. But it afford-
ed an excuse for the opulent maiden

STATE ORGANIZER OF WAR WORK
CAMPAIGN MAKES VISIT HERE
Miss Ruth Leiber, chairman of the
United War Work campaign in the
colleges of Michigan, was in Ann Ar-
bor yesterday to help complete or-
ganization for the campaign here
which will begin a week from Sun-
day. She has made a complete tour
of all the colleges in the state and
reports that allgare ready to begin
the drive.
Miss Leiber was graduated from the
University of Illinois last June,
where for two years previous she was
b mamhaof the Pditarial. dtaff of the

to spring the new fur coat and it
gave the barracks dweller a hunch
tliat the despised Q.M. undies might
not always remain unappreciated, and
it made the Ann Arbor householder
take a gloating look at his collection
of black sdiamonds down cellar. More-
over, Shorty, the linotype man, will
have to set up another stock variety
of weather to run in The Daily when
the day is going to be fair and warm-
er. So altogether it was a climatic
event. .
THREE POUNDS OF SUGAR NOW
ALLOWED PERSON PER MONTH
Mr. A. D. Groves, county food ad-
ministrator, received word from Lans-
ing Thursday, that in the future three
pounds of sugar will be allowed each
person per month. Another change is
that one-half of this amount may be
purchased at one time.
Flour restrictions have been lifted
to the extent that only one-fourth of
the amount of wheat flour must be
added in substitutes. Some flour con-
cerns have been milling flour con-
taining the required amount and it is
expected that they will accordingly
lesson the amount of substitute.

A. A.AintA.ad
Place-Says B3ill
Dere Mable: Maybee you wonder I
aint been riting so regular. Well its
this way. I'm having such a good time
here in A. A. that I ain't had no time
to thing about you. First thing,
Mable, I got spilled out of my downy
in barber gym one nite wen the floor
gave way and .all the fellows got
busted up but all I did was sustaine a
frakchered nee. But dont worry none,
Mable becuz theres a lot of nice
ladies and girls here taking care of
me at the old Rocky Mountain club
on fifth avenoo. They treat us guys
swell, talk about being in gravy I say
I wisht you could lamp us here, the
pretty-well ones sitting up playing the
victrola and riting letters like me,
and the pretty-sick ones in bed with
four orderlies taking care of them.
And the food honest, Mable we got
more food here in a day than your
mother gives her boarders in a week,
all donated by folks in town and
around in the country, pies and pota-
toes and punkins and froot and last
Sunday we had a reel chicken dinner
with all the fixins. Gee, Mable I hate
to make you feel bad by telling you
all this. Theres a guy heresthat plays
the violin and at nite we sit around
and he plays for us, kind of sad. It
makes me think of you, Mable.
-.Gosh I hate to leave but the doc
says I'm all better, so I gess its me
for the barracks,
yours with the frakchered nee,
BILL.
UNIFORMS AND DRAFT PAPERS
COME FOR NAVAL SNIT HERE'
Ninety-one uniforms arrived here
yesterday and were issued to the men
in the naval unit. Draft release pap-
ers of the following men should be
called for at once at navy headquart-
ers:

FRANCE TO SEND
SEVEN MEN HERE
The educational mission, which the
French government is to send to the
United States for the purpose of giv-
ing lectures before the universities
and learned societies, will visit the
University about Nov. 22, the definite
day being subject to the date of ar-
rival of the boat and other necessary
changes. Although the formal an-
nouncement regarding the object of
the mission has not yet been receiv-
ed, it is thought the purpose follows,
that of the English educational mis-
sion-the end of procuring closer co-
operation between our educational
institutions and theirs.
The members of the French mission
are: Prof. Emanuel de' 'Martonne,
University of Paris; Dr. Theodore
Reinach, editor of "Gazette des Beaux
Arts;" Prof. Fernand Baldensperger,
University of Paris, and Columbia
university; Prof. Charles Cazamian,
University of Paris; Dr. Etienne Bur-
net, Pasteur institute (Paris); Mr.
Charles Koechlin, composer and musi-
cal critic, and Mr. Seymour de Ricci,
art critic.
Each member of the mission is one
of the leading scholars of France.
Their reception has been assigned to
the American council on education.
The mission, which is to be divided
into groups so as to reach as many
institutions possible, will be in the
United States during November and
December.
ANN ARBOR DRUGGISTS NOW
PERMITTED TO - SELL DOPE
Ann Arbor druggists and physi-
cians have at last received word that
they may refill, for sufferers of influ-
enza, prescriptions for morphine, co-
deine, and heroin.. Detroit pharma-
cists have been doing this for several
days, but official word was just re-
ceived in Ann Arbor yesterday from
the collector of internal revenues,
James J. Brady. -
In the notice it stated that the col-
lector is very anxious to have the
physicians fully protected in the writ-
ing of such prescriptions and that he
urges that special care be taken in
making the proper notation, "Repeat
if necessary" on the prescriptions.
-Notice will be given through the daily
press when the foregoing privilege
-may be withdrawn.
Papers Here for S. A. T. C. an
S. A. T. C. induction papers at the
County building are fairly well clean-
ed up. Abe E. Emerman is requested
to call for his as soon as possible.

London, Nov. 1.- Attacki
front of six miles, south of
ennes this morning, English f
adian troops captured betwe
and 3,000 prisoners and infi
tremely heavy losses on the
This announcement is made i
ficial report from Field Mars
tonight.
Paris, Nov. 1.-The fourth
army, in conjunction with
ericans on their right, laun
attack this morning on the
front to the north and south
iers, according to an officia
ment issued by the war office
The attack was on a front
12 1-2 miles from the vicinit
tingy to the north of Olizy.
Summary of War Situal
From the mountain regions c
ern Italy to the plain of Ven
on salient sectors in Belg
France, the armies of the
allies are being violently atti
troops of the Entente.
In Italy, except on several
in the hill country, the enem
being overwhelmed; in both
and France additional splend
have been reported in favoi
Entente, in the achievement c
the men from the United Sta
a goodly part.
Austrians Escape Serb
In Serbia the Austrians a
ing good their escape out of t
-kingdom. Many have crossed
ube.\. French and Serbian
,have reached Belgrade, fron
point a fast turning movemen
the Save river is likely to wor
with enemy forces coming no
in western Serbia and those
struggling northward throe
bania.
So far as Turkey is concer
capitulation is an abject one
Ottoman no longer is a facto
world war.
Belgians Advance Toward
In Belgium along the Schel
Berchem to Gavere, King Albe
have pressed forward in the
direction of Ghent, and at
counts were standing on the
side of the canal which the
hoped, before the concentrate
was begun against them so
ago, would prove a strong
their northern defensive syst
To the south, below Valet
English and Canadian troo
driven the German line farti
ward over front of six mile
ing exceptionally heavy casu
the enemy and drawing their
most to the outskirts of
(Continued on page fou

ment of the enemy, toward a y ImeimeUI Me. Ulw.1A VLA
ieuto river, is virtually a DailyIn.
out, with Allied airplanes
tacking with machine guns PROF. ARTHUR J. DECKER, NOW
s of the enemy hurrying CAPTAIN, GOES TO GEORGIA
with the cavalry cutting
ers to pieces, and the in- Prof. Arthur J. Decker of the sani-'
machine gunners taking a tary engineering department received
in men killed, or wounded a commission as captain from Wash-
mnbers of the Austro-Hun- ington several days ago and will leave
1 continue to be winnowed for Fort Oglethorpe,. Ga., Saturday
line to the prisoner cages. morning, where he will be stationed
itities of stores are still with a sanitary corps. Professor
the hands of the Entente Decker has been connected with the
aumerous additional towns engineering department for the past
liberated...b 10 years.

Horace C. Wilber, Walter
Colin McCormick, Fred E.I
Walter C. Ludwig, Theron G.
and Roy D. Moynahen.

Bauer,
Motley,
Finzel,

1

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