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November 01, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-11-01

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I .

CUUULELJ,
Y

V IJUW

* Itg

ASSOCIAT
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

27.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1918.

PRICE

I

M7&ยง

i

LIANS

BAG

50,000

s RECOIL
ES HURL
iH TROOPS
WESTERN FRONT
ENCH MARE
T GAINS
,PARATES
ABOVE PIAVE

FLU DECREASING;
SCHOOLS OPEN SOON
No new cases of influenza or pneu-
monia were discovered among S. A.
T. C. men yesterday and only seven
of influenza and two of pneumonia
were reported among civilians. This
is the smallest number of new cases
since the beginning of the epidemic.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, city health of-,
ficer, announced last night he was so
encouraged by the reports that if the
condition does not change for the
worse today he will permit the schools
to re-open on Monday. I
Three S. A. T. C. Men Die
Three S. A. T. C. men died from
pneumonia following attacks of in-
fluenza. They were: Theodore E.
Ebbett, Co. 3, of Morley; Ortie Meyers,
Co. 1, of Allegan; and Oscar Henry
Holmes, Co. 4; of Ecsanaba.
Fifteen S. A. T. C. men were re-
leased from the special company sta-
tioned at the old Union building and
detailed to their own companies yes-
terday. About that many more S. A.
T. C. men were discharged from the
infirmaries and detailed to this spec-
ial company.
Contrary to the rumor that theaters
and public places will be reopened
Sunday or Monday, Dr. Wessinger

s Dan-
Sea

ssianBlack
-s to Allies

(By the Associated Press)
talian army headquarters, +Wed-
day, Oct. 31 (8 P. M.).-In answer
Austria's announcement that she
i ready to evacuate Italian terri-
y, Italy has officially replied that
offer has come too late. It is as-
ied that the Italians will endeav-
to drive the Austro-Hungarians
n the soil before the Armistice

s advancing from the
ve captured 50,000 Aus-

is advancing, taking thousands of
prisoners and many cannon.
Allies Push Beyond Piave
The Italian armies are pushing aft-
er the enemy in the mountains and
on the plains. Allied troops have
reached- Sacile, 18 miles east of the
Piave river. The Austrians, on de-
serting Asiago, left great quantities
of munitions- behind them.
The problem of the Allied command-
ers now is to throw enough cavalry
and light troops across the Piave
river, which is still low, to overtake
and capture the main sections of the
Austro-Hungarian army.
Washington, Oct. 31.-Italian troops,
have reached Ponte Delle Albi, north-
east of the city of Belluno, thus defin-
itely dividing the Austrian armies,
said an official wireless message ar-
riving here tonight from Rome.
In the Grappa region the Italians
renewed the attack today and captur-
ed the Plateau of Asiago, and the sa-
lients of Solaro, Monts, Spinoncia,
Prassaolan, Asolne, Col Caprile, and
Col Dennato.
Italians Rout Austrians
The Austrians have been complete-
ly routed east of the Piave river, an
earlier dispatch said, and they are
with great difficulty sustaining the in-
cessant pressure of the Italian troops
in the mountain region, on the plain,
and on the Alpine foot hills of Vene-
tia. Enemy masses were described
as "streaming in confusion down the
mountain valleys in an attempt to
reach the passes on the Talliamento."
Prisoners, guns, war materials and
store houses, scarcely touched, fell
into the hands of the Italians. Czecho-
Slovak troops are operating with the
third Italian army, which is press-
ing and overcoming the enemy.
The total number of prisoners now
exceed 50,000, and of the guns cap-
tured more than 300 have been
counted.
Summary of War Situation
More than 50,000 prisoners have been
taken by the Italians, British, French,
American and Czecho-Slovak forces,
and everywhere from the mountain
regions to the plains of Venetia, the
enemy is being sorely tried. In the
mountains where stiff resistance had
been offered to keep the foe from en-
tering the back door of Austria, the
enemy's front is cracking under the
violence of the attacks, and important
(Continued on Page Four)

says they will remainc
Governor of Michigant
ditions to be such tha
safely opened all over

closed until the
announces con-
at they may be
the state.

Sergeanr-m'ajo
To DgrillWomen
Beginning Tuesday, Nov. 5, Ser-
geant-major Fischer, assisted by Miss
Marion Wood and Miss Marion Daw-
ley, is to have charge of the women's
class in military training. This class,
is now held at Palmer field at 2:30
o'clock Tuesday'and Thursday. Dur-
ing the winter the work will be car-
ried on in Barbour gymnasium, and
-if a sufficient. number of women en-
roll, a battalion will be formed and
given intensive training on a strict
military basis. This plan has been.
carried out with great success at the
University of Chicago, where an en-
tire unit has been organized. The
military authorities here favor the
plan and feel that the discipline and
good posture -resulting from such a
.training are decidedly worth-while.
The new class will be formed in
two weeks, and all those interested are
asked to see Miss Wood at her of-
fice, Room 143, New Science building.
CLASS ABSENCES
MUST BE EXCUSED
The number of absences in the
classes of the literary college is de-
creasing 'daily and since the- confu-
sion caused by the influenza epidem-
ic has almost subsided, the rules gov-
erning absences will, from now on,"
be applied to the limit.
The committee on attendance an-
the following hours during
which the students not in the military
organizations may call to present ex-
cuses: for men, from 10:45 to 11:45
o'clock on Wednesday, and from 2:45
to 3:45 o'clock on Thursday; for wom-.
en, from 10:30 to 11:45 o'clock on
Monday and Thursday.
To the rules announced last week
by the committee has been added:
Willful disregard of summons from
attendance committee or , the dean
shall render the offender liable to
suspension.
Chelsea Man In Today's Casualties
Edward Hoover from Chelsea is list-
ed in today's casualty list as wound-
ed severely.,

"NO GRFT "SAYS
AIRCRAFT REPORT
Hughes and Gregory Lay flame on
Incompetent Signal Corp >
Officers
HAVE NO FAULT TO FIND WITH
AIRPLANE PROGRAM SINCE MAY
Abandonment of Types of Planes and
Failure to Salvage Caused
Waste
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 31. - The long-
awaited report on the aircraft inves-
tigation conducted during the last
five months by Edward Charles Hugh-
es and Attorney General Gregory was
placed before President Wilson today
by the attorney general, and immedi-
ately made public.
"Delays and waste of the produc-
tion program," the report declares,
"were due chiefly to the defective or-
ganization of the work of aircraft
production and the serious lack of
competent direction of that work by
the responsible officers of the signal
corps." No fault is found with air-
craft affairs since the reorganization
of last May which placed John D.
Ryan in charge. The civilian person-
nel of the aircraft production board
is exonerated of any wrong doing.
Would Prosecute Army Men
The attorney general, in a letter
transmitting the report to President
Wilson, says he is in "substantial ac-
cord" with the findings of Mr. Hughes.
The report says "no graft" is the
generally accepted fact, but makes
recommendations for proceedings
against armyy officers held guilty of
dealing with corporations with which
they were interested.
The chief waste of the original ap-
propriation of $698,851,866, the re-
port says, was in the abandonment of
two types of airplanes,--one of them
the Bristol-and a failure to salvage,
aggregating about $24,000,000. The
figures show that last May $134;000,-
000 of that great appropriation ac-
tually had been disbursed and that up
to Oct. 1 the expenditure had reach-
ed about $140,000,000, for all aviation
purposes.
Refutes Bad Faith Charge
Contracts let, however, committed
about $470,000,000 of the fund. The
figures are given in answer to the
general charge that the sum had all
been expended with practically no re-
sults. The attorney general con-
cludes in his letter of transmittal that
"no such profits had been allowed as
to justify a charge of bad faith."
LARSON REGIMENT
M E S S SERGEANT
Edwin S. Larson, '20, member of
Co. 16, S. A. T. C. section A, was ap-
pointed regimental mess sergeant to-
day by the authorities in charge. He
is now in command of all army mess
halls in Ann Arbor.
For the past three weeks, Sergeant
Larson has been acting mess ser-
geant in charge of the army mess
hall on the second floor of the new
Union building, and he received his
new appointment because of the qual-
ity of his work in this capacity.
Americans Register in Japan for Army
Tokio, Oct. 31. - Sixty Americans
are registered for military service in

Tokio and 75 in Yokohama, under the
law requiring registration between
the ages of 18 and 45. The returns
from other cities in the Japanese em-
pire are not yet available.

MAJOR DURKEE NOW
COMMANDS S. A. T. C.
Ralph H. Durkee, commandant of
the Michigan unit of the students'
army training corps, received yester-
day by telegram a commission as
major.
Major Durkee received his captain-
cy at Fort Benjamin Harrison about
a year ago. His home is in Con-
neaut, Ohio, where he was, a high
school teacher. Major Durkee has
been a football player and coach,
which is undoubtedly where he ac-
quired much of his interest in ata-
letics.
Major Durkee came here in the
spring of 1918 and took charge of the
first group of mechanics that were
trained at the University. His work
here has been declared to have been
highly successful by both military and
educational authorities and it was the
reputation acquired in this work that
had a great deal to do with the ap-
pointment of Major Durkee as com-
mandant of the S. A. T. C. and his
subsequent promotion.
Open Season For
Wild Geese Here
Breathless but beaming with his
own importance, the S. A. T. C. war-
rior presented himself with all nec-
essary military red (and brown) tape
to the Q. M. sergeant in the latter's
retreat at State and Huron streets.
From an inner pocket the persipring
rookie succeeded in extracting the
cherished document so recently hand-
ed him by another young general.
The document was a requisition for
the following articles of bellum:
1. Extended' order blanks.
2. Paper stretchers.
3. Skirmish lines (for cleaning
rifles.)
4. Cannon reports.
5. Rifile shoulder pads.
6. Oiled rifle rulers.
7. Wicker trigger guards.
8. Wooden rifle cases.
Helas, the ambitious fighter return-
ed to his barracks empty handed! The
sergeant had regretted keenly that
the supplies in question had been en-
tirely exhausted.
You guessed correctly, rough read-
er, the obliging doughboy was the
victim of a mad, mean joke.

21S.
GO

A. T. C.
TO CAMP

SUPREMEWAR COUNCILTO DETERMI
ARMISTICE CONDITIONS FOR GERMA
BERLIN REPORTSDISORDER IN II
GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE DETERMINE TO HOLD BLAC
ENTRANCE; ENTENTE CONSIDERS QUESTION OF
INTERNATIONALIZATION OF STRAIT
FRANCO-BRITISH REPRESENTATIVES WORK OR
OTTOMAN PEACE TERMS; DARDANELLES (
World to Ask Autocracy to Surrender Hun Navy and Submarines, D1
went of Armies on Different Fronts, and Occupation of Rhin
Strongholds; Government Heads Hold Formal Meeting
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 31.-Turkey has unconditionally surrendered
Allies; Austria is earnestly seeking peace terms, and the' remaining
ral Power is making a vain attempt to force the Entente to grant it a
istice on German terms.
Paris, Oct. 31.-The representatives of the Entente powers b
Versailles after their first formal meeting today, visibly content w:
results that have been achieved. They have not finished their wor
they have reached a substantial accord. Their task is moving, at
have had the satisfaction that they soon will be able to mak
nouncements. The Turkish armistice terms were chiefly the work
British and French.' The United States had no part in making then

MEN
GRANT

RIOTS IN AUSTRIA
Berne, Oct. 31.-Military insurrec-
tions occurred in both Vienna and
Budapest, according to the Berlin
newspapers. Tle people and troops
acclaimed a republic.
Vienna, via London, Oct. 31.- An
Austrian deputation 'has been per-
mitted to cross the fighting line for
preliminary pourparlers with the Ital-
ian commander, according to the of-
ficial announcement tonight.
Kaiser Abdicatesi
London, Oct. 31.-(10:30 P. M.)-
High-placed German officials at Cop-
enhagen this afternoon received in-
formation that the kaiser has abdicat-
ed, according to the Exchange Tele-
graph company, which adds:
"Nothing is said about the crown
prince."
--A
Amsterdam, Oct. 31.- The Berlin
Tageblatt and Vossische Zeitung pub-
lish reports of serious demonstrations
at Vienna, as well as at Budapest. An
all provisional soldier and officer
council has been established at Vien-
na, where the people are parading the
streets shouting "down with the Haps-
burgs."
Austrians Cheer For Wilson
London, Oct. 31.-Disorders prevail
throughout Austria-Hungary in ad-
dition to immense confusion. Serious
outbreaks have appeared at Buda-
pest, and . agitations are spreading
everywhere, according to dispatches
from newspapers.
The Berlin correspondent of the
Copenhagen National Tidend says,
that on the Hungarian-Croatian front-
ier, thousands of deserters are com-
miting outrages, and railway trains
are being attacked and robbed. In
Slavonia several castles are afire and
towns are burning. Another dispatch
says that Austro-Hungarian soldiers
are deserting into Serbia.
During demonstrations in Prague
American flags were unfurled and
diminutive statutes of Liberty dis-
*played. They also cheered for Presi-
dent Wilson.
FIVE JUNIORS ELECTED TO
MEMBERSHIP IN WYVERN
Wyvern, jiior girls' honorary lit-
erary society, elected the following
five new members yesterday: Rose
Sturmer, Gretchen Jones, Margaret
Jewell, Ione Brown and Pauline Ben-
edict.

ARMISTICE PROGRAM
Washington, Oct. 30-Presider
son cleared up his task as in'
diary for peace and armistice
of the Central Powers as pres
patches were bringing the ne
Turkey's surrender, and of
foreshadowing an early collar
Austro-Hungarian arms.
Formally, as well as actuall
whole question of the conditioi
on which the war may end i
before the American and Allie'
resentatives upon which the wa
end is now before the America
Allied representatives in Paris
next step probably will be a de
of those representatives on ar
terms, unless before this is re
Austria follows the example o
garia and Turkey and capitula
the field before the great driv<
her forces to pieces in Italy.
Work on Armistice Progras
It may be stated that the art
program which -the Germans
may not differ essentially frozn
dictions; that it will include s
der of the German navy and a
rines, disarmament of the G
armies, and occupation of G
strongholds. The signing of th
gram has not been completed
any informal announcements ar
mature. Exchanges between I
can and Allied governments a
as discussions among the repre
tives in France still are in prc
It was intimated that the purel
itary phases of the problem pr
had been worked out in advar
the supreme war council, but th
hurried deliberations are necess
dispose of certain questions i
ed in the making of permanent
which must be dealt with in
fixing terms of an armistice.
Secretary Lansng made publi
ing the day a note handed to Am
dor Riano, of Spain, informin
that the Turkish request that h
pose an armistice and peace nE
tions, delivered by the amba
Oct. 14, has been submitted 1
President to the governments E
with Turkey. Later the secreta
nounced that the last Austriar
munication, supporting a simil
peal with acceptance of the stipt
of complete independence for i
nationalities, had been forwar'
America's co-belligerents.
Germany's Hold Broken
Great satisfaction over the da
velopments was evident every
American and Allied military m
(Continued on Page Four

Twenty-two members of the S. A.
T. C. left yesterday morning for an
officer's training camp at Camp Grant,
Ill. Most of the men were from sec-
tion B. They were all men recom-
mended by their company command-
ers as showing especial ability.
The men who left are: Thomas
Berghouse, David O. Brown, John L.
Campbell, Robert B. Dancer, Paul C.
Dancer, Horace C. Evelind, Lloyd W.
Ham, Charles W. Hawkins, Harold R.
Gohr, Phillip J. Pelloquin, W~iber D.-
Richter, Claude M. Shook, Quentin D.
Soffle, Harold W. Wormley, Stanley L.
Worthing, Guy V. Houston, John R.
Riley, Laigh C. Anderson, Leicester K.
Deller, Paul H. Garvey, William J.
Modrack, and Maynard Jacobs.
G. F. Godley, '21E, goes to West Point
Gordon F. Godley, '21E, left yes-
terday afternoon for West Point to
enter the United States military acad-
emy. He was enlisted in the Univer-
sity naval unit, but was discharged
to allow him to accept his recent ap-
pointment as a West Point cadet.
This action is out of the ordinary but
as he had applied for the appointment
before enlisting in the naval unit his
discharge was granted from Washing-
ton.

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