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October 31, 1918 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-31

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THE WEATHER
FAIR ANDACOOLER
TODAY'

rI Bk 43 tan

:4Ia1l

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 26. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1918. PRICE THREE CEN

CZECHS DISCUSS INTERNAL QUESTIONS;
SUPHEME COUNCIL HOLDS INFORMAL
MEETING; BRITISH ISSUE DEMANDS

"GERMAN
FREEST

PEOPLE SHALL BE
PEOPLE IN WORLD,"
KAISER

PRESIDENT WORKS ON
ANSWER TO AUSTRIA
Austria to Sue Directly to Italy for
Peace, Claims Washington
Report
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Oct. 30.-"The Germai
people shall be the freest people lin
the world."
This declaration was made by Em.
veror Wilhelm in addressing the new
state's secretary Oct. 21, according to
a Berlin dispatch printed in the Rie.
niche Westsaelische Zeitung of Es.
sen.
Paris, Oct. 30 (6 P. M.).-The heads
of the Allied governments and Col. E.
M. House, special representative of
the United States government, with
the military and naval advisors of the
respective countries, continued their
Informal meetings today.
Differences in View Arise
Difference of view, naturally to the
immensity of the interests involved,
las arisen. But under friendly exam-
ination they have largely disappeared.
Although some points in President
Wilson's declarations may require
more complete definition, an entire
agreement is in immediate prospect.
The supreme war council will not
meet formally until this full under-
standing has been reached.
Basel, Switzerland, Oct. 30.-Nego-
tiations are going on between the
government officials of Bohemia and
the national Czech committee to in-
sure a public administration, says a
dispatch today from Prague. The pres-
ent Bohemian officials will remain
provisionally, but the governor, Count
von Couden houze, has been placed on
unlimited leave at his own demand.
Hun to Release British Captives-
London, Oct. 30.-That the immedi-
ate release of all British prisoners
will be insisted upon by the govern-
ment as part of the armistice is con-
fidently expected here. Sir George
Cave, the home secretary, announced
in the house of commons yesterday
that the same conditions imposed upon
Bulgaria in this matter would be in-
sisted upon in any truce with Ger-
many or Austria, and General Allenby
has been instructed to follow the
same policy in dealing with the Turks.
Such a demand will be a very im-
portant factor and it is not likely
that the other Allies will show less
regard for their nationals who are
suffering in German camps.
Washington, Oct. 30.-The general
opinion among officials and diplomats
here is that the German proposal for.
an armistice and peace, while having
its origin in a plan to gain time for
strengthening the army and restoring
its shattered morale, has now gotten
beyond the control of the military
party, and that the German people are
the force which is driving the German
government to make for ending the
war.
Germany Sends Another Note
Another note from the German gov-
ernment, explanatory of the changes
that have been made or are projected
in the German constitution and form
of government, was received today
through the Swiss legation, but the
state department did not make it pub-
lie. This note was understood to be
supplementary to the preceding Ger-
man communication saying to the
President that he must have knowl-
edge of the efforts that have been
made to democratize Germany.

Wilson Remains Quiet
President Wilson was at work today
on his reply to Austria's renewed plea
for an armistice. It was understood
,that the President intended to touch
upon the steps that Austria and Hun-
gary have taken in the direction of
releasing subject peoples from polit-
ical bondage, but that the Austrian
government's plea would be referred
(Continued on Page Four)

MEDICS TO RECEIVE
SHEEPSKINS EARLY
The exact date for the graduation
of the senior medical students has not
yet been decided upon, but it will
probably be some time in March. The
medics continued their studies during
July, August, and September and
therefore will be graduated three
months earlier than usual.
There are about 55 students in the
senior medical class this year, the
majority of them being in the medi-
cal reserve corps. There are a few
students who are not in the reserve,
among them three women.
The reserve corps men, after grad-
uating, will either be stationed at
hospitals or called into active service
by the government.
MAY SAVE MAN'S
EYE CUT BY GLASS
Clifford Matson, '22 sustained a
serious cut in his right eye a few
days ago, when a hydrogen genera-

Gobs Gain Salt
Air And Sea Legs
Gob uniforms arrive.
The ships of our student seamen
(known to ununiformed and unadorn-
ed people as naval barracks) ring ear-
ly and late with the terrible sounds of
whacking. Whacking is the process
of beating the rookie roll out of the
newly arrived hats, and it is accom-
plished with hammers, hairbrushes,
and hands and scads of salt water to
give that old sea-goin' atmosphere.
Many a suffering sailor agonizes
long over his "yard square" of black
ribbon, kidding and pounding it into
a neat little neck crape, and many
another swears long and vehemently
as he tries to lace both legs and three
cubic feet of near serge into one
small yellow canvas spat. Aspiring
jackies toss on their cots rehearsing
the traditional "And the 13 buttons
are for the 13 states and this star for
- " so that they may be truly en-
tertaining when they next step out.
Sea legs are being hastily acquired
without the aid of either salt water
or other stimulants; nothing but the
hardtack, the dog-watches and the
albatross are lacking in briny Ann
Arbor.
ONLY ONE NEW CASE OF
FLU -IN STUDENT ARMY

......................_..._.

tor with which he was experimenting SIX
in the chemical analysis laboratory
exploded.

DEATHS BUT FEW NEW
CASES OF INFLUENZA IN
CITY

It was near closing time and one
of the students, wishing to hasten the
experiment, poured concentrated, in-
stead of dilute acid into the generator.
It instantly exploded, throwing glass
in Matson's eye, he being about 10
feet from the generator. Those stand-
ing near the generator did not hap-.
pen to be injured.
Matson ran to the health service
and finding no one there continued to
the Homeopathic hospital. The jar
caused by running made the glass cut
deeper into the eyeball and it was at
first thought necessary to remove the
eye at once.
Later, Dr. George Slocum, a special-
ist in ophthalmology in the Medical
school, was called. The most recent
report is that the eye can in all prob-
ability be saved. Matson's home is in
Corning, N. Y.
WAR CAMP COMMUNITY SERVICE
HEADQUARTERS AT CITY HALL
Francis Bacon, '02, director of the
war camp conmunity service in Ann
Arbor, has announced that the head-
quarters of the local committee will
be in the office of the civic association
on the second floor of the city hall.
Mr. Bacon's office hours will be from
9 to 10:30 o'clock in the mornings,
and he can be found there between
those hours or by calling 1779.
CORRECT STATEMENT REGARDING
FLU CASES IN BARBOUR GYM
The Michigan Daily wishes to cor-
rect the statement made in yester-
days' issue to the effect that 120 cas-
es of influenza are harbored at pres-
ent in Barbour gymnasium. The con-
tract physicians in charge of the cases
there state that they have at present
only 12 cases there, all of which are.
convalescing.
Non-Citizens in S. A. T. C. to Meet
Members of the S. A. T. C. who are
not naturalized citizens, but who
want to become such before leaving
for camp, are requested to meet be-
tween 4:45 and 5:45 o'lock this aft-
ernoon in the lobby of Lane hall, the
University Y. M. C. A. If five or more
men can be found who want to be ex-
amined for citizenship before leaving
tor camp, an examiner will be sent
for by the local board to take care of
the matter for the men.
Y. 14, C. A. to Start Military Training
The general Y. W. C. A. has classes
in military training to be held in the
high school gymnasium. Sixty girls
have enrolled in the classes so far and
it is thought that many more will.
Jt was planned that the work should
have started some time ago but be-
cause of the Spanish influenza, the
time for beginning was postponed.
Classes-will begin as soon as the epi-
demic is entirely over.

Six deaths was the toll of the in-
fluenza epidemic yesterday, but few
new cases of either pneumonia or in-
fluenza have developed. In the S. A.
T. C. there was only one new case of
each of these diseases and 33 men
were discharged from Barbour gym-
nasium infirmary. This leaves only
12 cases being cared for there. The
statement in yesterday's Daily on the
number of cases still under treatment
there was incorrect.
Conditions among Ann Arbor resi-
dents and civilian students remain
about the same. The three deaths oc-
curring outside of the military organ-
izations were those of Miss Catherine
Ligan, Miss Ellen Bertha Person, '09,
and Chester Spaulding.
Albert Summerfield, Co. 4, of Bran-
ton; Paul Hogle, Co. 3, of Alanson,
and Lenard Thompson, of Manton,
were the three S. A. T. C. victims of
pneumonia today.f
Urges Continued Precautions
"While the influenza is on a decided
decrease, now is the time to exercise
strict precaution," says Dr. J. A. Wes-
singer, city health officer. He ad-
vises all dormitories, rooming houses,
barracks, and privatehresidencesvto air
all rooms thoroughly, remove and
brush all clothing in closets and de-
stroy all food that has been in the
room since the epidemic started in
the city. Unless this is done con-
scientiously, the germs of the disease
will remain in the residences and the
epidemic may break out anew.
Miss Berth Person, '09 Dies of Flu
Miss Bertha Person, '09, who died
yesterday, had been society editor of
the Times-News for seven years. She
is survived by her father, Robert Per-
son, now in California, a sister in New
Jersey, and her mother and a brother
and sister at home. Funeral services
will be held at the residence, 911 East
Washington street, at 10:30 o'clock
Friday morning. The Rev. Henry Tat-
lock of St. Andrews' Episcopal church
will officiate.
WOMEN'S CAMPAIGN MISNAMED
WHEN GIVEN TITLE, TAG DAY
There has been considerable misun-
derstanding on the campus in re-
gard to the so-called tag day, being
conducted by the Women's Athletic
association for members. A ruling by
the Board of Regents states that no
tag day may be held for the purpose
of raising money.
The application of the term tag day
to the membership campaign is a
misnomer, being used merely because
a girl who has joined the association
is given a tag to wear, indicating the
fact she has joined.
The funds raised in the membership
campaign are used to promote wom-
en's sports, to finance the annual ban-
quet, and cotillion given at the end
of the basketball season, and to furn-
ish other amusement for the girls.

Officers Pleased
By Student Army
The commanders ofboth the naval
unit and the S. A. T. C. are quite
pleased with the progress shown in
their respective branches. "I was
much pleased that it was the best we
have had up to date. A large number
of sick men have returned to their
places and they are making a good
showing." Admiral Berry, in com-
mand of the naval unit, also express-
ed the opinion that the work in his
branch was progressing. "We are get-
ting things in better shape now," he
said. "It is a great satisfaction to me
that things are straightening up so
well."
For the sake of those who are in a
weakened condition from influenza,
the drill period has been divided into
15 minute periods. There is one of
calisthenics, one of games which
build muscle and develop alertness,
one of rest, and a half hour of drill.
This system has been adopted in or-
der to help those who have had the
flu to stand the strain of drill which
otherwise might have bad effects.
AMERICANS RESI ST
FIERCE HUN TTACKS
YANKS CHASING AVIATORS DOWN
21 GERMAN PLANES NEAR
VERDUN
(By the Associated Press)
With the American forces north-
west of Verdun, Oct. 30 (7 P. M.).-
General Pershing's forces today iM-
proved their positions in the region
of Grandpre. Belejoyeuse 'farm is
now virtually within the American
lines.
By the occupation of Aimereville
the Americans have brought within
their lines a series of hills and natur-
al positions dominating the country
for miles. Aimcreville was taken with
but little opposition, the resistance
being principally from machine guns.
Eact of the river Meuse there was
considerable activity today but there
was no material change in the line.
The Germans desperately resisted at-
tempts to drive them from Hill 360.
With the American army north-
west of Verdun, Oct. 30 (11 P. M.).-
Twenty-one German aviators were
downed today by American chasing
aviators. It was a banner day in1
American aviation, considering the
number of victories achieved over the
Germans.
Two American airmen are missing
as a consequence of the air fighting.
TECHNIC'S NEXT APPEARANCE
MAY BE LAST ONE OF SEASON
It is expected that the Technic will
make its debut about Nov. 15. It is
doubtful, however, if publication will
be continued, after this issue, as most
of those on the staff are in the engi-
neering reserve and liable to induc-
tion to the S. A. T. C. The copy has
been sent to the printer and the work
is now being rushed.
Some of the attractive features of
the number are a list of notes, names
and addresses of engineering students
in the service; an article on "The

Training of an Engineer Officer," by
Lieut. M. R. Norcop, ex-'20E, who is
now with the engineering corps.
Lieutenant Norcop is an ex-member
of the Technic staff. Other attrac-
tions will be snapshots of interesting
portions of the campus, drawings, and
pictures.
The magazine will sell for 25 cents
this year instead of 40 cents, for
which it sold formnerly.
FUNERAL SERVICES OF ANTONIOS
PANAYOTIDES THIS AFTERNOON
Funeral services of Antonios Pan-
ayotides, '19M, will be held at 3:30
o'clock this afternoon at Meuhlig's
undertaking establishment. Burial
will be made in the Ann Arbor ceme-
tery. The funeral services will be
held under the auspices of the senior
medical class. Panayotides had no
known relatives in this country.

U. S REGIMENT HITS ENEMY IN ITALY;
AUSTRIANS LOSE 33,000 TO ENTENTE;
TURKS ASK ALLIES INTO DARDENELLE

BRITISH MISSION
WILL VISIT H E R E
The British educational mission,
which the British government has
sent to the United States to inquire
into the best means of procuring clos-
er co-operation between British and
American educational institutions,
will visit the University and be pres-
ent at Convocation exercises to be
held Nov. 6, if the epidemic slackens.
On the invitation of the council of
national defense, this mission comes
for the end, greatly desired on both
sides, of making firm the bonds of
sympathy and understanding that now
unite the English-speaking people.
The members of the mission are Dr.
Arthur E. Shipley, vice-chancellor of
the University of Cambridge, master
of Christ's college, and reader in zo-
ology; Sir Henry Miers, vice-chancel-
lor of the University of Manchester
and professor of crystallegraphy; the
Rev. Edward M. Walker, fellow, se-
nior tutor, and librarian of Queen's
college; Sir Henry Jones, professor of
moral philosophy, University of Glas-
gow; Dr. John Joly, professor of ge-
ology and mineralogy, Trinity college,
Dublin; Miss Caroline Spurgeon, pro-
fessor of English literature, Bedford
college, University of London; and
Miss Rose Sidgwick, lecturer on an-
cient history, University of Birming-
ham.
At the request of the council of na-
tional defense, the American council
on education has undertaken to make
all the arrangements for the recep-
tion of these guests. A large honor-
ary reception committee, of which
President Harry B. Hutchins is a
member, has been appointed.
It is expected that the members will
give short addresses at the convoca-
tion exercises.
Four Vocational
Mie.tings Planned
Plans for the Women's Vocational
conference have entirely changed for
this year. Because few girls had time
to attend so many meetings in succes-
sion it was decided that the confer-
ence shall be divided into four sec-
tions this year.
The First meeting will be held about
Nov. 21. Dr. Reuben Peterson, direct-

CENTRAL POWERS SUCCUMB T
ATTACKS OF FOUR NATIONS
IN ITALY
TEUTON ALLY RETREATS
TOWARD OWN FRONTIER
Serbs Reach Danube; Brititsh Ad.
vance Continues Up Tigris River
From Bagdad
(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
London, Oct. 30.-It is reported
that Turkey has invited the Al.
lies to send their fleets into the
Dardenelles, and also to land a
small detachment 'of troops to
supervise the demobilization of
the Turkish army.
Rome, Oct. 30.-The 332nd American
infantry regiment is participating in
teh battel in the Brenta region, ac-
cording to the war office announce-
ment tonight.
Since Oct. 24 the Allies have captur
ed 33,000 of the enemy, including 802
officers.
In Albania the Italians has occupi-
ed Sangiovanni and Dimedua, and are
advancing on Scutari.
(The 332nd United States infantry is
composed of men from Ohio and Pen-
nsylvania. The Americans reached
Italy late in July and were warmly
greeted by the king, the ministers, and
the populace generally.)
Summary of War Situation
Over a front of some 60 miles from
the Brenta river, in northern Italy, to
the vicinity of the Adriatic sea the
Austro-Hungarians are being violent-
ly attacked by Italian, British, French,
and American troops.
East of the Piave river the enemy is
in flight across the plains of the Tre-
viso, shaping his course over the same
territory through which he drove the
Italians a year ago and reached the
eastern edge of the plains of Venetia,
Austrians Lose 33,000 Men
Already numerous towns have been
liberated, 33,000 prisoners have been
taken, and large numbers of guns and
machine guns and huge quantities of
stores have fallen into the hands of
the Allied troops. Far behind the lines
Allied aviators are heavily bombing
enemy columns in dense masses which
are in retreat over the badly congested
roads leading eastward toward the
Austrian frontier.
French Start Big Drive
On the western front in France and
Belgium there has been a marked
diminuation in the intensity of the in-
fantry activity. Along the British
line there has been only patrol en-
counters and reprisal bombardments.
The French, however, areengaged
in another attack on a front o about
seven and one-half miles between St.
Quentin-le-Petit, and Herpy, In the
general direction of the enemy's com-
munication lines in the old St. Quen-
tin-Laon sector, which may compel the
enemy to re-adjust his front through
Champagne to the Meuse river.
Yank Gun Shells Enemy
The big American guns are con-
tinuing to heavily shell German posi-
tions for behind the lines, and bomb-
ing planes also are intensively active
against troop concentration points. In
air fighting the Americans Wednesday
sent 21 German aviators crashing to
the ground. Two of the American fly-
ers are missing.
In both Serbia and Mesopotamia the
Allied troops are still harassing the
enemy. Serbian cavalry has arrived
at the Danube, a short distance south-
east of Belgrade. In Mesopotamia the
British advance has continued up the
Tigris river from Bagdad.

MASK NOTICE
President Harry B. Hutchins
does not wish it to be under-
stood by the statement which
appeared in The Daily yester-
day morning, that masks should
be worn at all times. He asks
that students and instructors
wear them only in class.

or of the University hospital,

will

speak on the positions open to wo-
men in bacteriology, and Miss Marion
Peterson will talk on dietetics. Miss
Marjorie Delven, of the state board of
public health, will also speak. The
second meeting will be held in Janu-
ary. Dean Henry M. Bates of the Law
school, will tell about the openings
for women in law. An attempt is also
being made to engage a woman law-
yer.
It is hoped that Miss Melita Hutzel,
of the girl's protective league, of De-
troit, and Miss Claire Sanders, of the
Detroit civilian relief, will speak in
March on women's opportunities in
social service. Mr. James Glover, of
the economics department, is anxious
to induce women to enter the actuar-
ial field and will tell about the govern-
ment bureau of statistics. The last
meeting is to be held in April. It is
hoped that Mrs. Franes Kelly, organ-
izer of the women's land army, will
be present to urge the girls to do their
share in the fields as they did last
year. -
Personal Conferences Urged
The committee lays stress on the
personal conferences and urges all
the girls to take advantage of the op-
portunity of getting definite informa-
tion about positions.
The following committees have been
appointed by Margaret Christie, '20,
chairman of the vocational confer-
ence: Program committee, Frances
Wesley, '20; entertainment, Hilda
Heusel, '19; publicity manager, Dor-
othy Herman, '21; personal confer-
ence, Alice Comlossy, '21, and treas-
urer, Jeannette Armstrong, '17.

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