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October 29, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-29

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'o,4,

i~wi a

iiv

Assoc]
PRI
DAY AND NI
"' SERF

,Y 1

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1918.

PRICE

1APTURE 9,000 AUSTRIANS;
1 TROOPS GAIN NEAR GUISE;
i PROGRESS ON FOUR FRONTS

TRAIL TO-
DER; HUN
HT
, RANGE
T TIME

tuate Kraguiezetz,,
heast of Belgrade,
Serbia

55

e Associated Press)
. 28. - More than 9,000
ere taken prisoners in

on the Italian
ding to the war,
oday. Fifty-one

front
office
guns

Associated Press)
28.-Still further

pro-

ade by the French
e and they have
the east of Perron
ice announced to-
,tors have been ex-'

the Associated Press)
the battle zones the Allies
rncing .with marked success.
e, the German battle line is
isintegrating under the viol-
he Allied offensive; in north--':
, the Austro-Hungarians are
reed back by the British,
ad Italians with heavy loss-
n killed, wounded, or made
near the shores of the Med-
,n in Albania, the Italians
ng the Austrians toward the
ran front, while in Asiatic
both in Syria and Mesopot-
British are fast clearing the
om their former strongholds.
ritish Gain Near Mons
of Valenciennes, in France,
irshall Haig's forces, not-
ling stiff opposition, has ad-
he line in the general opera-
eh has in view the capture
iennes, and then pressing on
Mons and Maubeuge, in the
converging movement that is
between Belgium and the re-
;h of Verdun. Further south,
Oise river to 'the region of
he French have gained a
L'tory by forcing a retreat
.emy in the big salient north
and are threatening to cause
pse of the entire German line
, American troops have been
nto the line near Rethel and
anced nearly a mile and tak-
rous prisoners.
erman war office admits the
of the thrust of the French
the Oise and Serre rivers,
hat the German lines were
n Sunday night west of
I east of Crecy.
Use Long Range Guns

C'est la Guerre
Groan Poor Sophs
The pole was there all right, the
sign would have held the freshmen
as it has held many more like them,
and the spirit was willing, but the
army and the law were too much.
State street was wet and how they
could have rolled the peanut! With
what ease would it have slid along
the pavement!
The next consignment ,of hats for.
the $. A. T. C. men. who are still in
their ,adolescence will probably need
to be several' sizes larger. Even
though the students of the ever-wise
sophomore class, who had assembled,
were trying to save the quartermas-
ter trouble, 'twas no -use
The captives were all ready to ex-
ercise their vocal cards in their hor-
rible high school yodels when the arm
of the law-an awfully long arm, by
the way-swept the hazers aside. And
the fight was. off!
Thus did the cocky ones find a ref-
uge Sunday night and they departed
to their homes in happy ignorance of
the fact that when they become up-
perclassmen they will make the
slrangest representatives of upper-
class dignity that have ever graced the
fair campus of Michigan. State street,
once the Rue de Senior in the even-
ings,, has become the gamboling place
foir the most infantile collection of
college students that Tom Lovell ever
recited "The Sna, the Sna, the Begu-
tiful Sna" to.
C'est la guerre!
DEBATING LEAGUE
CANCELS CONTESTS
In communication with the univer-
sities of the central debating league
comprised of Chicago, Northwestern
and Michigan, and with those of the
mid-west debating league comprsed
of Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan,
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood, of the or-
atorical department, found that at
'least four of these unversities had
agreed to relinquish intercollegiate de-
bating activities until after the war,
or at least for this year's duration.
The northern oratorical league con-
test, however, will be held the same
as usual. The universities in the
northern oratorical league are Wis-
consin, Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois,
Oberlin, Northwestern, and Michigan.
The oratorical contest this year will
be held the first Friday 'in May at
Northwestern university. Orations of
those who expect to participate must
be completed by February 1.
TOMORROW LAST CHANCE FOR
FILLING NAVAL UNIT QUOTA
Men desiring to enlist in the Uni-
versity naval unit have only until
tomorrow night to do so. Twenty more
men are needed.
The unit now numbers 480 men.

SEVEN MEN ARRIVE
FROM GREAT LAKES
Yesterday the following men' re-
ported from the Great Lakes naval
training station for active duty with
the Michigan naval unit : Verne V. Ry-
on, Alvin G. Henry, Arthur Arthur A.
Koebrich, George V. Brown, Robert
L. Hesse, James J. Sorenson, Delbert
D. Smith. These men are to be as-
signed as company commanders in the
unit.
The work of completely reorganiz-
ing the unit was begun yesterday. The
men are being assigned to permanent
barracks and are grouped as much as
possible not only in barracks, but al-
so in companies according to their
class and college in which they are
enrolled. It is expected that this sys-
tem will result in a much better,
grade of academic work done by the
men. The increase of company com-
manders has necessitated forming
more companies in the unit.
FLU EU UMIC WINESU
PNEUMONIA CLAIMS 8

CONVALESCENT MEN
GET FREE CONCERT
An endeavor was made Sunday aft-
ernoon to entertain convalescent
soldiers and sailors,torchestras and
singers making the tours of the in-
firmaries and barracks. The work
was carried on with the co-operation
and under the direction of the war
camp community service.
Ike Fisher furnished three orches-
tras and Company 13, which possesses
a musical organization of its own, a
fourth, the four furnishing music in
-y different places. Several individ-
uals with accordians, banjoes, man-
dolins, and guitars made a tour of
barracks and institutions not possess-
ing a piano. ,
Several business men of the city
accompanied the entertainers and told
stories to the men.
C U PERITTED
SPECIA TRIP HERE

CITY PHYSICIANS USE MAYO STAR TO LEAVE NEW YORK IN

SERUM AS PREVENTIVE
MEASURE

OPERA SEASON TO FILL
ENGAGEMENT

Infiluenza and pneumonia have
claimed eight victims in the S. A. T.
C. since Saturday. The dead are:
Lawrence Knox, of Plainwell; Lisle
Saxton, of Lake View; Ralston Flem-
ming, of Alma; John Arthur, Elmer
Ross, both of Grand Rapids; Benja-
min Lambers, of Freemont, and Les-
ter Loring, of Mattawan. Saxton as
married just three weeks ago.
There were fewer new cases of in-
fluenza reported yesterday both from
the naval unit and the S. A. T. C.,
two men from each branch were taken
ill.
For the benefit of the S. A. T. C.
men convalescing from the disease the
war camp community service sent or-
chestras around to play at five con-
valescent infirmaries Sunday. During
the afternoon several business men of
the city entertained the patients with
addresses.
Mayo Serum Used Here
A preventive serum discovered at
the Mayo hospital in Rochester, Minn.,
is being used by some of the city phy-
sicians. It is employed purely as a
preventive measure and not as treat-
ment in a case of the disease. It has
not been used long enough to deter-
mine whether or not it is of value, but
it comes to Ann Arbor well, recom-
mended.
In th city there were 18 new cases
of flu and seven of pneumonia report-
ed. The three deaths among civilians
were: Oscar Yedele, Fred Root, Miss
Donna Fralick, and Miss Opal Oven-
shire. Miss Fralick, of Sycamore,
Ohio, had just begun her senior year
as a nurse in the University hospital
training class. Miss Ovenshire was a
student in the Ann Arobr high school.
All medical students in the S. A. T.
C. have been detailed to the hospitals
as orderlies. It is not known for what
length of time they will be left there.
Schools to Stay Closed
While the epidemic has abated con-
siderably in the' student body, Dr. J.
A. Wessinger, city health officer, an-
nounces that the public schools will
remain closed until next Monday at
least. The high school authorities feel
that the epidemic has slackened
enough to re-open but the health de-
partment is taking no risks and the
schools will be closed until all danger
is passed..
DR. T. G. MASARYK SIGNS BILL
SITTING IN HISTORIC CHAIR
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 28. - Dr.
Thomas G. Masaryk, head of the Cze-
cho-Slovak republic, signed 'the dec-
laration of common aims of the dem-
ocratic union of mid-European na-
tions, on Saturday. He was seated in
tlhe same chair in which John Han-
cock signed the Declaration of Inde-
pendence.
The convention represented 65,000,--
000 persons now under Teutonic rule.
They purchased a liberty bell, a re-
plica of the first, with money obtain-
ed by voluntary contributions. This
bell rang out the defiance of the op-
pressed nation 'to Germany's war
lords, after the declaration was signed.

Enrico Caruso's Ann Arbor concert,
which has been twice postponed on
account of the state-wide ban on pub-
lic gatherings, will take place later
in the season. Mr. Chas. A. Sink,
secretary of the University School of
Music, has received positive assur-
ance of this fact from Mr. Gatti-Ca-
sazza, general director of the. Met-
ropolitan Opera company, with which
Caruso is under contract beginning
Novi 4.
It is an unheard-of precedent for
Caruso to leave New York during the
opera season but owing to the condi-
tions of postponement he has been
granted permission' to make a special
trip to Ann Arbor to fill this engage-
ment.
The pre-festival series will accord-
ingly be opened on Saturday evening,
Nov. 16, by Anna Case, prima donna
soprano of the Metropolitan Operk
company, assisted by Mr. Gilbert
Spross at the piano. The board of
health has assured Mr. Sink that there
is little doubt but that the influenza
epidemic will'have entirely abated by
that date.
New Title G iv e n
Captain Ily Rookie
Capt. V. C. Vaughan has received
another title. He is now, in the lan-
guage of a rookie in the S. A. T. C., a
"guy." Captain Vaughan's new honor
was copferred upon him yesterday
morning when 'one of the latest ac-
quisitions of the S. A. T. C. entered
the office of the infirmary ' at South
Ingalls street and inquired for Cap-
tain Vaughan.
"You're looking at him now," an-
swered the captain, to whom the ques-
tion was addressed.
"Oh, are you the guy?" queried
the new recruit, obviously ignorant of
the fact that such disrespectful lan-
guage renders the speaker liable to
court martial and consequently "what-
ever punishment the court martial
may direct."
(Editor's note:-Captain Vaughan
accepted the title graciously and the
rookie still lives, unconfined in guard
house but now cognizant of the ne-
cessity of following the rules of mil-
'itary courtesy when addressing his
superior officers).
Women at Chicago Begin Training
The University of Chicago Women's
Training Corps has been organized in-
to nine companies, with nineteen com-
missioned officers. On account of the
number of women taking this work
more officers are needed, and will be
appointed as soon as possible. Com-
pany competition will be introduced
and encouraged by the instructors
and officers.
Americans Trade Bread with French
With the American Forces in
France.-A common sight along the
highways of France where American
troops are in camp is to see the Amer-
icans trading their white bread sup-
plied by the army for the darker bread
baked by the French peasants.

NOTE UNCHANGED,
Washington, Oct. 28.-While Ger-
many's latest note to President Wil-
son was being delivered to the state
department today through the Swiss
legation, cable dispatches from Eur-
ope brought information that he Aus-
tro-Hungarian government had caus-
ed another communication to be dis-
patched to the President asking that
immediate negotiations for aL armis-
tice be entered into without awaiting
the exchange of views from Germany.
The Vienna government asserted
that it adhered to the same point of
view given by the President in his
last communication, upon the rights
of the Austro-Hungarian peoples, es-
pecially those of the Czecho-Slavs and
Jugo-Slavs and requested that he be-
gin overtures with the Allied govern-
ments with a view to ending hostilities
on all Austro-Hungarian fronts.
Washington Remains Quiet
The official text of the German note
did not differ materially from the un-
official version received by cable. No
official comment is forthcoming, but it
is known that no response will be
made at present to the communic-
tion, which is believed to have been
dispatched with the primary purpose
of satisfying the German people that
their governr6ent is not ommiting any
opportunity of forming an armistice
and peace.
Regarding the reviewed assurance
in the German note that the constitu-
tional structure of the German gov-
ernment has been changed to demo-
cratic lines, it is pointed out that the
truth of this statement and the scope
oc' he changes already ade or pro-
jected after all are matters to be dealt
with in connection with peace, and
not in arranging an armistice. A
strong indisposition was evident of-
ficially to yield to the apparent intent
of both the German and Austrian ne-
gotiations to combine these two es-
sentially different functions in one
phase of the negotiations.
Austrian Note en Way
In the case of the Austrian com-
munication, now supposed to be on
its way to Washington through the
medium of the Swedish government,
it also was noted that an effort was
made to show that Austria has com-
plied with the President's demand for
the recognition of the rights of the
Czecho-Slavs and Jugo-Slavs and oth-
er oppressed nationalities in Austria.
It does not appear that the complete
independence of these people has been
guaranteed, and probably sufficient
assurancemust'be had on that point
before the Austrian proposals will 'be
transmitted to the Entente powers or
'submitted to the military experts.
The Michigan Daily staff will
have a picture taken for the
Michiganensian at 12 o'clock to-
dayat White's studio.aThose
whoes names appear, above the
editorial column are expected to
appear for it.

AUSTRIA'S ANSWER,
Amsterdam, Oct. 28. -
her reply to President Wils
all the views expressed by
identin his note of October
Austria says she is wi
ready, without awaiting th
other negotiations, to ne
peace and an immediate ar
all Austro-Hungarian fror
It is understood that he
couched in the "most e
terms," but .to intimation a
has been made public.
(By the Associated P
London, Oct. 28.-Austria
der to President Wilson's
ready, according to Vienna
Basel dispatch says it was
to authorized quarters Si
was to be sent last night o
is reported to be couched in
conciliatory terms.
Professor Lammasch rece
asked to form an Austrian c
accepted on condition that
Hungary immediately mak
rate peace with the Allies,
dispatches. Reports from V
that Emperor Charles decla
thing was impossible, sayin
given his word of honor tc
man emperor never to ma
rate peace.
(By the Associated Pr
Copenhagen, Oct. 28. -
answer to President Wils
communication says:
"The German goveri
taken cognizance of thea
the President of the Unite
"The President is aware a
reaching changes which h
carried out in the German
and that peace negotiations
conducted by a people's gove
;whose hands rests, both ac
constitutionally; the power
the deciding conclusions.
"The military powers are
ject to it.
"The German governan
awaits proposals for an
which shall be the first ste
just peace as the President
scribed it in his proclamatic
FRESHMAN WOIM
DON GREEN RI
Many of the freshman gir:
rying out the idea, which or
Newberry residence, and ar
the green bow on their left
though rather late in getti
the spirit of rivalry betwee
lower classes is booming al
cellent shape and the act!
first year women is a ma
tinction which W111 tend to
'freshmen girls.
The usual custom of w
green button is replaced by
ribbon. Sophomore wowpe
trusted with the job of instr
first year women in the cu
traditions of Michigan in
way the second year men

HUN REPLY ARRIVES -IN WASHINGTO1
HEICHSTAG HEFUSES TODISCUSS
NOTE1 AUSTRIA TO RECOIGNIZE
GERMAN ALLY SEEKS PEACE AND IIflEDIATE ARMISTICE
AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN FRONTS; BERLIN MESSAGE
FAILS TO CHANGE FROM UNOFFICIAL VERSION
EMPEROR CHARLES GIVES KAISER WORD NO'
TO ARRANGE SEPARATE PEACE WITH A
Complete Independence of',Slavs to Be Guaranteed Before Enten
Proposal to Military Chiefs; Governmental Officials Giv
Out no Comment on Two Answers
(By the Associated Press)
AMSTERDAM, OCT. 28.-A DISPATCH FROM BERLIN SAYS
A PROPOSAL THAT PRESIDENT WILSON'S NOTE TO GERMAN
NOT BE DISCUSSED IN THE REICHSTAG WAS ADOPTED BY
BODY AT A MEETING HELD FRIDAY. THE CONSERVATIV
INDEPENDENT SOCIALISTS VOTED AGAINST IT.

the first time since the. An
entered the war they have of
e against the back lines of
with their new long ra
and are heavily bombar
yon, some 15 miles distant f
merican first line positions.
r the territory, through wt
nerican guns are throwing t
that the Germans have b
rcing their lines eastward,
i the blasting process prove
e in blazing a trail along
for a quick advance by
cans it is not improbable th
to retreat, from the region4
Continued on Page Four)

ner-
pen-
the
nge
ding
rom
It
hich
heir
een

SENIORS, NOTICE!

,1 medical and engineering
iors in the reserve corps
can do so, are requested t4
e their Michiganensian pic
s taken any time today. Of
,l photographers 'are: White
lio, Swain, Randall au
k, and Rentschler. Thos
n later than today will b
appointment. Please inform
photographer what it is fo
,hat he may get the correct

and Three extensions of time have al-
ef- ready been secured by those in charge
the
the of recruiting here. Enlistments were
th ato have closed Oct. 3 and the quota
at a
east was thought to be filled at that time,
but it was later ascertained that men
registering previous to Sept. 12 were
not eligible. This left several vacan-
cies and the time for enlistments was
extended to the 10th, the 20th, and fin-
'ally the 30th of October.
g No further extensions of time will
3 be given. Tomorrow will be the last
- chance for men to enlist.
The recruiting office announces that
- any college student, not in a reserve
corps, who registered Sept. 12 may
present themselves for examination
today or tomorrow in room 345 Nat-
e ural science building,
r Men from this corps will be rec-
r ommended for naval officer material
when a call comes from the depart-
ment in Washington. The men chos-
en will be sent to a naval officers'

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