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October 26, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

the Round Up club are
their names, addresses,

-_I
MORROW
M. C. A. will extend
ssion to include some
ction A, S. A. T. C.
have already been or-
is expected that about
enrolled.
r advertisers.-Adv.

sked to'

-RMATION BUREAUS
STATIONED AT DEPOTS

and phone numbers to 0. F. Tietjen,
431 East University avenue.
American Soldier Escapes from Huns
Berne, Switzerland, Oct. 25. - An
American private soldier has return-
ed to his regiment in Alsace. He is
the first American prisoner to escape.
He is a Pennsylvanian named (de-
leted), originally of a Luthuanian fam-
ily.

ier

-Rochester

finest ready-to-wear clothing in
ica for the civilian or soldier. -

ER-ROCHESTER OVER
SERVICE COAT

SEAS

e are the exclusive agents in Ann
r for this famous coat. Drop in
look it over.

tz Clothing Store
217 South Main Street

WAFFLES

TODAY

14
I,

FRANCIS BACON, '02, AND HARRY
MEYER WILL BE IN CHARGE
OF THE WORK
Volunteers will be stationed in the
three railway stations of the city to
give information to relatives and
friends of members of the S. A. T. C.
and University naval unit. These
volunteers, who are not members of
either of the campus military organ.
izations, will be at all three depots
all day today and tomorrow. At each
station a sign will be erected reading
"War camp community service; in-
formation bureau for relatives and
friends visiting soldiers and sailors."
All work of the war camp commun-
ity service is being carried on under
the direction of Francis Baco, '02,
who has received appointment as di-
rector. Working with Mr. Bacon is
Harry Meyer of the Congregational
church, who has had considerable ex-
perience in this kind of work.
In addition to attempting to stand-
ardize the dances for all S. A. T. C.
men, signs will be put up directing
people to the Hostess house where in-
formation can be secured. The Civic
association has appointed a committee
consisting of Harry Gillen, chairman;
Ernest Gwinner, and Warren Burk-
ley who will co-operate with the man-
agement of the W. C. C. S. in their
efforts to standardize-the dances.
Captain Ralph H. Durkee has ap-
pointed Lieut. Percy Thompson to act
as an advisory member of the general
committee of the service. The cap-
tain has also issued a call for the
election of men from the various bat-
talions to serve on the dance com-
mittee.
Headquarters of the service will be
announced within a few days. Own-
ers of automobiles who will volun-
teer the use of their machines for the
convenience of visitors at the local
camp are asked to call Josephine
Randall, '17, for further information.
REGENTS GIVE OUT
DEGREES AT SESSION
(Continued from Page One)
en by Mr. Robert Lockwood of Ann
Arbor, were accepted by the board.
Mrs. James Wallace was made so-
cial director of the Alumnae house,
and Miss Lucy Elliott, of Newberry
residence, Librarian William W.
Bishop was granted leave of absence
gy; Mrs. Lila Pargmont, assistant in-
structor in French, and C. J. Coe, as-
sistant professornoftmathematics.
The regents granted degrees to the
following: Doctor of Medicine con-
ferred on H. W. Grover and Amelia
T. Wood; Doctor of Dental Surgery,
J. 0. Goodsell; Embalming and Sani-
tary Science certificates, Glenn A.
Shearer, Francis J. Wolbrink, and
Harold Phair; Juris Doctor, Alvin E.
Evans; Master of Law, M. R. Mor-
ton; Bachelor of Law, B. D. Bairam,
B. S. Motter, S. C. Pickas, D. M. Si-
in order that he might accept an in-
vitation to'work for the American Li-
brary association, acting under the di-
rection of the war department at
Washington. Colonel Walter R. Par-
ker's leave was continued one year.
A report from the University health
service showed that during the year
1913-14 there were 15,700 dispensary
calls; during 1914-15, 26,172; 1915-
16, 26,204; 1916-17, 26,896, and 1917-
18, 24,634. During each of the same
years the calls made by different in-
dividuals are respectively as follows:
3,650; 4,585; 5,307; 5,792, and 3,872.
The following leaves of absences
have been granted: William L. Schurz,
Harry C. Carver, Prof. Evans Hol-

brook, E. Lewis Hayes, and H. J. Col-
han.
Roy H. Holmes was appointed as
an instructor in sociology; H. S. Lu-
cas, instructor in history; Peter Ok-
kelberg, assistant professor of zoolo-
mons, and H. E. Rosenthal; Master
of Science in Engineering, Samuel S.
Kaplan; Master of Science, Jesse L.
Bollman, University of Illinois, Gladys
F. Ding, Southwestern college, Grace
F. Ellis, Olivet college, George R.
Herrman, Clarence J. Leonard, Loula
A. Paschke, and Ellen D. Schulz;
Master of Arts, Albert Allen, George
J. Blazier, Peter C. Cabral, Mabel B.
Crozier, Margaret Ferguson, Helen
H. Hallock, Thomas E. Hook, Floyd
N. Langworthy, Howard Scott Lind-
dell, Ethelyn F. Mullarky, Marjorie
H. Nicolson, George E. Roop, Mathil-
da M. Schroeder, Peter Van Beck,
Guillermo Z. Villanueva, and Wynand
Wichers.
Those to whom degrees of Bachelor,
of Arts were voted are: James Baje-
ma, James Carmichael, Herman Chap-
man, Mary Ruth Connelly, Edward;
Cory, James Cobb Crittenden, Harry
Day, John Farrell, Robert Fitzpatrick,
Marjorie Frace, Jeanie Frost, Fred-

PROF. A.oEIsOA0K WITES
WILL FORM PART OF VOL. XIV
OF UNIVEVRSITY OF MICH-
IGAN SERIES
An important monograph by Prof.
A. E. R. Boak will shortly be published
in the "Humanistic Series of Uni-
versity of Michigan Studies," of which
it will form the first part of Vol. XIV.
It is entitled "The Master of the Of-
fices in the Later Roman and Byzan-
tine Empires," and will fill more than
one hundred fifty pages.
The monograph treats the so-called
"masters" who were magistrates of
the Roman Republic, or had other
public functions in connection with
religious or other organizations of an-
cient Rome, or were, finally, officials
in the civil service or military service
of the Roman Empire. It then fol-
lows the history of the mastershil
through its various transformations
to the fall of the Byzantine Empire.
The value of the monograph is greatly
enhanced by appendices containing
full references to the literature of the
subject.
Professor Boak has devoted several
years to the investigation of which the
results are embodied in this work.
The present year, however, he is giv-
ing most of his time to courses con-
nected with military training and
work with the United States naval
unit.
Of the Humanistic Series previously
10 volumes have been published, and
the first parts of two others. The
volumes in this series deal with art,
literature, history, language, sciences,
and other subjects which contribute
to general culture. They have all been
written by graduates of the University
of Michigan, and are widely known
throughout the United States in in-
tellectual circles. The recent book of
Professor Boak's will be published in
November or December.
Frostic, Lydia Galloway, Rose Clif-
ford, Rebecca Greenburg, Isabella
Hunford, Ada Heath, Julia Heideman,
Roy Huffman, William Jenkins, Ber-
nice Jones, Ira King, Ethelyn Mc-
Clelland, Marie McGrath, Verna Ma-
trau, Harriet R. Medes, Edith Miller,
Albert Reddering, Charles Reebs, Jo-
nas Sawdon, Marguerite Schneider,
Corwin Smith, Russell Springer, Mary
Surine, Blanche Towns, Olive Turner,
Cornelius VandeValde Mrs. Friede
Wuerful Westerman, Edward J. Will-
man, Catherine Wynne, and Harold
Zeiger
The board recommended the ap-
pointments to fellowships as follows
University fellowship, $500, to Albert
Hyma; $200 to Blanche M. Wood.
The next meeting of the board of
regents will be held on Nov. 22.
NEW INSTRUCTORS AND ASSIST-
ANTS APPOINTED ON CAMPUS
Work in the various departments of
the University is being carried on and
conducted as extensively as in pre-
vious years. -A large number of as-
sistants ,and instructors have been
and are being appointed from time to
time.
The recent appointments made in
several of the departments for the
year 1918-19, are as follows: Edward
J. Petry, instructor in botany; W. J.
Murphy, assistant in forestry; Evan-
geline Shoebridge, custodian in the
zoology department; Lavinia Mac-

Bride, John Van Gosten, Morokiyo
Wyehara, D. G. MacMillan, Teijo Ito,
W. K. Bowen, Alexander Chenik, Hat-
tie Ainslee, Grace Griffin, E. Priscilla
Butler, and Lenore McQuinn, student
assistants in the zoology department.
Collect Vietrola Records for Service
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, conductor of
the Detroit Symphony orchestra, and
his wife, Clara Clemens Gabrilowitsch,
are aiding in the quest of unused
phonograph records to be sent to sol-
diers and sailors through the Nation-
al Phonograph Records Recruiting
corps.
People possessing records that have
long lain unplayed and unappreciated,
are urged to send them to Grinnell
Bros. music store, 234 Woodward ave-
nue, Detroit, or to public library
branches. Each person contributing
10 or more records may bring one to
be kept by himself to the above ad-
dress and have it autographed by Mr.
and Mrs. Gabrilowitsch.

FRANCO-ENGLISH BAG 11,000
MEN AFTER HARD FIGHT
(Continued from Page One)
Grandpre, which lies in. the valley
above the famous Argonne forest, sev-
eral hills of the utmost importance,
from a strategic standpoint, have been
taken from the desperately resisting
enemy machine gunners and artillery.
Numerous violent counter attacks
have been launched by the Germans
against the Americans, but all these
have been successfully sustained. The.
Germans in this region now are bad-
ly outflanked by the French standing
on the left of the American line at
Vouziers and it is probable that they
soon will be compelled to readjust
their entire line from north of Vou-
ziers to the north of Etain.
S. A. T. C. ATTENTION!
The army and navy "Y" at
Lane hall has made every pre-
paration to assist you in sending
your civilian clothes back home.
When your uniform arrives
bring the old clothes over. You
will find wrapping paper, twine,
and everything else that you
need to mail your clothes in a
safe condition. We are glad to
serve you in this way. The
building is open until 10 o'clock
in the evening.

Book Cases

New arrivals in Winter Millinery at very
special prices at the New Millinery Parlors. Open
Tuesday evenings, 618 Packard.
PIANOS, VICTROLAS AND RECORDS, MARTIN
GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT
Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254-Fl

Company
112 S. Main St.

I

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
,Seather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks
Chairs

The Mayer-Schairer

MRS. PEARL

LAN DERS
OR
LOWERS
PHONE 294
213 E. LIBERTY ST.

FOR

[III1 11111II 11IH 1111111111111111h

L YNDON

719 N. University

I

BUSY BEE

Ann Arbor representative dealer in EASTMAN KODAKS, films
and supplies,'and photographer to Michigan Students. We do
THE amateur finishing business in Ann Arbor because we do
the kind that brings them and keeps them here.

313 S. State
Phone 13

Established in 1905.

Growing bigger and better every day since.

i-
t

71
I.

JRRY

HURRY

Get one of those

imb Lined Coats
And Ask to See
r Army Shirts
At $4.00

' 1
t' ,
f "
" +
f.
" x
r
_ _.
! aP , ver

Beif our

The

$9

We have a nice Line of

,. &a c -

eeping Garments
Just the thing for
The Cold Nights
We Carry a nice Line of
ociety Brand Suits and
Overcoats

Attention! Invest with the
& Say. Asso., Savings Bank Blk.
& Safest. Never paid less than
cent dividends. H. H. Herbst,
-Adv.

Bldg.
Best
6 per
Sec'y.

A Modern. Shoe.,..
.. An Old Fashion Price
If you need shoes, there is no economy in waiting
until they cost more. If we won the war tomorrow,
leather wouldn't be plentiful for some time.
This shoe is a favorite with men of all ages. You
see, besides comfort and style, it brings with it the
Famous Walk-Over quality.
Look at its thoroughbred lines, and then take a peep
back at the price. There is economy in getting such a
boot at this price.
Walk-Over Boot Shop
115 S. Main St.
R. J. HOFFSTETTER, Prop. FITTING BY APPOINTMENT

(UERTH CO.

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