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October 26, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-26

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L

t.q tan ~tAttx

PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT1
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1918.

PRICE THREE

t _ , , M _

t T

(S FORH
lIC RULE
XTTERM~
Y REPLIES TO
SEVERE
51W
['RIFIES
SHINGTON

OFFICIALS TO TURNj
TIME BACK OCT. 27
ay a federal statute, central stand-
ard time will be "set' back one hour,
and will remain so until further no-
tice. Mayor E. M. Wurster announces
that the city will turn the clocks back
today and the University will do the
same Sunday night. The new time
instituted on Monday will be Central
standard time, an hour later than
Eastern time, which the campus has
had since last October.
GARGOYLE MIKES BOW
TO UNIVERSITY TODAY

REGENTS CONFER
MANY DEGREES
AT LAST MEETING

APPROTE WORK OF S. A. T.
PERMIT Y. W. C. A. USE OF
FERRY FIELD

C.I

HEALTH SERVICE MAKES
INTERESTING R E P O R T

ose to Eliminate Waste;
Discuss Challenge
Next Week
Oct. 23. - President
tatement today address-
low countrymen, asking
n a Democratic congress'
er elections if they have
s leadership in this crit-
eturn a Democratic ma-
the senate and house of
s, the President said,
ild seriously impair his
inister "the great trust
>y the constitution," but
rpreted abroad as a re-.
its leadership.
ent's action electrified
t the capitol, who issued
y, in the name of the
in the senate and house,
men of the senate and
.can congressional cam-
ee.
hine Points to Record
can statement declaring
party in congress has
administration policies
with a unanimity and
criticism unprecedented
ry, and pointed to the

Pianoforte and Viola, Gifts to
University, Accepted by
Board

the

"PRIVATE
PEP AND

NUMBER" CONTAINS
CAMPUS MILITARY
SPIRIT

From the men standing on the cov-
er, saluting the world in general, clear
to the last jest buried in the adVertis-
ing section, the military flavor is
maintained in the "Private Number"
of the Gargoyle. Even in those jokes,
in which "He" says something to
"She" and "She" flings back some-
thing very amusing at "He," even they
are military and "He" is invariably in
khaki.
The fighting spirit is also present
which can be proved by the "Hep-
heps' whichbhave beenycaught and
actually appear in the editoritals.
The Gargoyle does not usually com-
pete with ThefDaily in printingnews
items, but it refuses to keep its hands
off of anythiig relating to the army.
So, in this issue, it is scooping The
Daily, printing some information
about Captain Durkee that The Daily
staff did not know. In fact Captain
Durkee, himself, didn't know some of
it.

President Harry B. Hutchins and
the military committee of the Uni-
versity, at the first meeting of the
Board of Regents held yesterday, were
given the power to enter into a final
contract with the government per-
taining to the matters under which the
students' army training corps and the
United States naval unit here are
operated. The present temporary
contract will remain in force until
the military authorities at Washing-
ton desire a new one. The board ap-
proved the work done by the S. A.
T. C. thus far.
The Regents granted permission to
the Y. M. C. A. to use Ferry Field on
Sunday afternoons. Mass games, in
which the army and navy men of the
University will participate, will be
held on the field. Such use will be
in conference with and approved by
athletic director, P. G. Bartelme, and
Capt. R. H. Durkee.
A grand pianoforte given to the
Stern's collection by Mr. S . John-
son, of Detroit, and an artistic viola
d'Amorie, of an old Italian makegiv-
(Continued on Page Four)
COA CHYOST BELI.ES
WAR IS LIKE FOOTBALL

JUNIOR GIRLS WANT
MORE PLAYS SENT IN
Laura Peacock, '20, chairman of the
Junior Girls' play committee, stated
yesterday that up to date only two
manuscripts had been handed in. The
material so far has been splendid but
insufficient.
The commtitee requests girls who
have written plays to hand them in,
and urges others who so far have
not made any attempt, to try to do so.
INFLUENZA SLACKENS
IN MOST ARMY CAMPS
10 NEW CASES DEVELOPED HERE;
16 DISCHARGED FROM
HOSPITAL
(By the Associate Press)
Washington, Oct. 25.-Three army
camps did not report a single new
case of influenza and only two, Kearn-
ey, California, and Lewis, Washington,
reported more than 100 cases. The
total of new cases for all camps,
the statement in the office of the sur-
geon-general said, was 2,375 against
2,772 the day before. Pneumonia cases
decreased from 699 to 500 and deaths
from 307 to 241. The camps which
reported no new cases were Wheeler,
Georgia, Custer, Michigan, and Mergs,
District of Columbia.
Four Locl Deaths
The influenza epidemic was the
cause of four deaths in this city yes-
terday. Only 10 new cases were re-
ported among University students and
about the same number among Ann
Arbor residents.
Two of the deaths occurred in the
same company of section B of the S.
A. T. C. They were Privates H. D.
Waterson of Ada, and Joseph Jacob-
son of Cope. Daisy Davis and Carl1
W. Jenkenson,. residents of the city,
were the other two victims of the dis-
ease.
Although seven new cases of Influ-
enza were discovered among members
of the S. A. T. C., 16 men were dis-
charged from the hospitals to the in-
firmaries. The military authorities
feel that the epidemic is now on the
decline but are not letting up in com-
bating the disease.
Three students were sent to the hos-
pital yesterday with influenza. Of the
other cases being cared for by the!
health service doctors, all are reported1
out of danger. Doctor Forsythe says'
that while the epidemic is now well]
under control, students should not dis-
continue the" wearing of masks inI
classes.1
Physicians Warn Convalescents a
Physicians warn those convalescent
from influenza to be especially care-<
ful at this time as the weather is
such as to easily cause those in af
weak condition to contract pneu-
monia.f
DRILL CONTINUES
IN SPITE OF RAIN

ar, the Republican statement
is not the President's "per-
r," nor the war of congress,
party, but of the American
nd declares "the Republican
presenting more than half of
enship of the country, de-
s rightful share" in the bur-
responsibilities it imposes.
mblicans to Cut Waste?
n a majority in- either or
ses, the leaders said, the Re-
party would drive forward
nd hasten victory, and would
Le waste now going on of
iven- by the nation.
senators and representa-
h Republican and Democrat-
personal statements during
and most leaders on both
pared for the debate which
cted in the senate, when it
les Monday after the week-
s, and probably in the house.
Y'S ANSWER AWAITS
WISTICE PLAN OF ALLIES
7 the Associated Press)
, Oct. 25.-President Wil-
e was received in Berlin in
se of Thursday's sitting of
stag, which immediately ad-
according to an Exchange
dispatch from Copenhagen.
n of the note was taken up
al meetings of the reichstag

RANCO-ENGLISH BAG 11,000 PRISONE
HUNGARIANS SMASH CROATIAN REI
ALLIES POUND ENEMY ON FOUR FRO

The Gargoyle has a deep interna-
tional significance. This fact is not
generally known in Ann Arbor be-
cause the instructors in the war aims
course have not given it the promin-
ence that it deserves. But we have
it on the best authority that the spy
recently captured on the Michigan
Central tracks two miles east of town
had instructions on his person writ-
ten on Von Hindenburg's own type-
writer. These read:
"In judging the temper and spirit
of the American people, make the Gar-
goyle the test case. If the editors can
invest their last dollar in Liberty
bonds, can hear the price of print
paper, and fact the difficulties of,. pub-
lication, and still issue a number as
cheerful as usual, there is.no hope for
us."
REPRESENTATIVES
GO TO CONFERENCE
Six representatives of the military
war work organizations left last night
for a conference to be held at Chicago,
The following are those selected to
attend: Mr. F. S. Stifler, representing
the Army Y. M. C. A.; Mr. George
Burke, representing K. of C.; Mr.
Robert McCandless, representing the
Students' Christian association; Mr.
A. Gornetsky, representing the Jewish
Welfare board, War Camp Commun-
ity Service, and S. N. T. C.; Mr. Earl
Miles, of Section A, S. A. T. C.; and
Mr. R. H. Jennings, of Section B, S.
A. T. C.
The conference is to be held at
the Auditoirum hotel, and is to be ad-
dressed by John R. Mott and Sher-
wood Eddy.
RECOMMENDS "TIT FOR TAT"
POLICY IN DEALING WITH HUNS

GIVES PLAYERS DAILY
ON WAR AND RECORDS
MOVES ON MAP

TALKS
ALL

)ct, 25.-The German war
asidered President Wilson's
lengthy session yesterday,
to the Frankfort Zeitung.
ided not to answer at the
ne, but to wait until it is
tat the Entente's armistice
may be.
per Denies Various Reports
m, Oct. 25.-Reports to the
Germany has ordered ces-
a1 destructions on the west-
have been denied by the
[ North German Gazette. of
also denies the report that
have been recalled.
NESS ASSISTANTS I
WANTED{
ss assistants are want-
he Michiganensian War
Those wishing to try4
Id report this afternoon
Lisiness manager, Michi-

"The British bulldogs are still bit-
ing," commented Coach Yost yester-
day afternoon after glancing at the
war news.
"Yes," he continued, "the Germans
are now finding themselves in an aw-
ful pickle. They are endeavoring to
retire to the line which winds its way
from Antwerp, through Malines, east
of Brussels, down the Meuse river to
Dun, and thence to Metz before the
Allied armies can corner them."
Combines War and Football
"Hurry Up" Yost has a large Ham-
mond map on his blackboard in the
Ferry field clubhouse. Every day he
marks up the Allied advances and
gives the players a little talk on the
war, previous to the daily instruction
in football tactics.
Every move or gain that is made
on the entire battlefront is carefully
recorded by the Maize and Blue men-
tor. Not only that, but he also fig-
ures out the possible places for an-
other drive.
"After the British, the American,
and the French armies clean up the
salient that now exists in the Ghent-
Valenciennes region," he said, "a
telling blow will be struck at the heart
of Germany.-
"This next drive, which may take
place before the snow begins to fall,
will either be south of Metz through
Lorraine, or north of Metz through
Luxemburg.
Metz Will Fall
"I believe that Metz will fall to
the Allies, but it will be by an en-
circling movement. They will not at-
tempt to take it directly due to the
immense number of strong fortifica-
tions surrounding the city."
The reason why the Allies did not
start an offensive in the Metz region
before this, he explained, is due to the
fact that there would be too many
Germans in the northern salients, and
they might be able to turn the tables.
"Football is analogous to war in
many ways," Coach Yost said. "The
different drives made on the battle
fronts are similar to the various pos-
itions and trick plays which occur on
the gridiron. The Allies are bucking
the line against the Hun, and when
they succeed in breaking through it
corresponds to a player, who carries
the ball, smashing through for sever-
al yards."

Yanks Force Huns
To Withdraw Line
(By the Associated Press)
With the Amercian army northwest
of Verdun, Oct. 25.-(8 P. M.)-From
a day of extraordinary severe fighting
the Americans emerged tonight slight-
in advance of the positions they held
yesterday. The gains made were slignt
but are regarded as extremely im-
portant, especially on 'the left where
higher ground, dominating much of
the surrounding terrain, has been
gained.
There has been comparatively little
alteration in the positions on the cent-
er, but the American footing in the
Belleu woods, east of the Meuse, was
more securely fixed, notwithstanding
the determined efforts of the Germans
to force the Americans back.
On the extreme left the gains made
by the Americans left them at the
close of the day on the ridge extend-
ing from Palma farm to Bellejoyeuse
farm, on a line through the Bourgogne
woods.
Clouds and ground mists reduced
aerial activity to a minimum, but the
artillery,'employing both high explos-
ives and gas projectiles in enormous
quantities, were used on both sides.'
Besides the artillery action at points
where the advance was in progress,
the Germans devoted much fire to the
back areas and that portion of the
front near Bantheville where the Am-
erican line was advanced slightly.
Despite a desperate resistance of
the Germans and the apparent inten-
tion to initiate a counter offensive, in-
formation falling into the hands of
the Americans indicates that the en-
emy will withdraw to the Briquenay
line. One informant declared that it
was the intention of the Germans to
withdraw to that position between
Oct. 25 and 31.
NEW YORK TO CHICAGO AERIAL
MAIL SERVICE BEGINS IN DEC.
Washington, Oct. 25.- Postmaster-
general Burleson announced today
that aerial mail service between New
York and Chicago will begin between
Dec. 1 and 15. The machines willf
leave Chicago and New York every
morning at 6 o'clock, and complete
the trip in 10 hours. This is the sched-
ule contemplated for the winter1
months. Each plane wil be able to1
carry 20,000 letters.
The first leg of the route will be1
from Chicago to Cleveland, 323 miles,
with an intermediate mailing station
at Bryan, Ohio, the second, from
Cleveland to Bellefonte, 215 miles,
with an emergency station at Clarion,
Pa., and the third, from'Bellefonte,
Pa., to New York, 215 miles, with an
emergency station and machine at
Leighton, Pa.
BAN ON MEETINGS POSTPONES
CARUSO CONCERT ONCE MOREt
On account of the recent state-wideE
ban on public gatherings, the Caruso
concert which was announced for
Nov. 2, has again been postponed
since the state board of health has
stated definitely that the ban will not
be lifted by that date.
Charles A. Sink, secretary of the
School of Music, is now negotiating
with Caruso's New York managers forE
a later date in the season. He .states
that the University Musical society is
entirely in sympathy with whatever
action the authorities may deem ad-,
visable in order to prevent the further
spread of the epidemic and is glad to
comply with the regulations.a

Draft Board Still In Need of Clerks
Volunteers to address question-
naires are still needed at the draftt
board office. Anybody having even an4
hour or two to devote will be accept-4
able. The office force has been slight-]
ly depleted by the influenza, and that,
coupled with the - extra work, makes9
additional clerks almost a necessity.
The draft board office is the only
county office which has been hit by the
epidemic, all others escaping withoutt
a single clerk or stenographer on the i
sick list.

"Ship for ship, town for town, man
for man."I
"That must be the law," says the
London Daily Mail," and the Hunj
must be told plainly that this is our
fixed determination.
Ship for ship-every German mer-
chantman, every German submarine
must be surrendered as one of the
conditions of peace. Town for town-
a German town must make good each
French or Belgian town destroyed or
itself be expropriated and be seized
and held a2 Belgian or French prop-
erty. Man for man-for every soldier
who suffers hunger a German officer
should be placed on short rations, and
if a Birtish soldier is ill-treated or

ENTENTE ARMIES NEAR
BEUGE, IMPORTANT RAILB
JUNCTION
AMERICANS PRESS HL
TO WALL AT GRAND
Yanks Strike at Hirson, Corner
of Foe's Defense; Meuse Se
of Heavy Fighting
(By the Associated Press)
WAR BULLETINS
Paris, Oct. 25. -The Fr
today advanced the line at
points, despite the most stubi
resistance of the enem.. :I
than.2,000 prisoners with ca
and machine guns were capt
according to the official statem
issued by the war office toni
London, Oct, 25.-Nine th
and Germans have been m
prisoners and 150 guns have 1
captured by the British in t
attacks against the Germans,
cording to Field Marshal Ha
communication tonight,
With the British Army in F
and Flanders, Oct. 25 (2 P. M.).-
ther important gains were ma
day by the British first and
armies in their encircling drive
Valenciennes. South of the in
city the attacking forces pushe
ward more than two miles, cap
Querenaing and Sepmeries, wh
the north Odomez was taken.
Croatian Soldiers Revolt
London, Oct. 25. - The rev
Croatian soldiers of the 79th
ment, at Flume, has been suppi
by three Austro-Hungarian regi
arriving from Albania, accordi
an Exchange telegraph dispatch
Copenhagen. There was hard
fighting at Fiume in which hut
of persons were killed, the di
adds.
(By the Associated Press)
The Germans in Belgium and F
still are stubbornly resisting t
tempts of the Entente Allied
to break through their lines
bring about the immediate collaj
the defensive positions. On the
they are succeeding, but nevert
on all salient positions under a
the enemy slowly is being :
backward.
Italians Ht Austrians
On the northern Italian .
front, between the Brenta and
rivers, the Austrians are being :
the test in a new attack by B
French, and Italian troops, wh
Mesopotamia the British again
gone on the offensive against
Turks, and at last accounts
making considerable headway.
bana and Serbia the operations
Allied forces are tending towar
slow, but sure, evacuation of t
vaded districts by the enemy fi
In the northern French theat4
British are centering theire'
south of Valenciennes to cave i
salient between that city ani
Quesnoy, and move on toward tI
portant junction town of Maul
with the two-fold purpose of 8
encompassing Valenciennes and
ing the Belgian border.
Hun Gives Up Maing
The Germans have been com
to give up the town of Main
most of the intervening points a
ward, along the railway to Le
noy, which now is all but in I
hands.
Between the Oise and. Serre .

American naval gunners, with 16
guns, have joined the French in
effort, to hammer their way n
eastward toward Hirson, one o
key points in the German line. Fu
progres has been made by the F
in this region but only after the
est kind of fighting.
Likewise on both sides of the 1
river the Americans have adv
their lines, notwithstanding the s
resistance of the enemy. Nor

Recent rainy days have not hindered
the training of the men in the S. A. T.
C. and and the Naval Unit. Drills are
continued as usual unless a heavy
downpour or the condition of the
ground absolutely prevent them. Then
the men are given lectures and quizzes
by their officers.
The Navy men get lectures on Navi-
gation and are quizzed on the Blue-
Jacket's Manual. The S. A. T. C. is ex-
amined on the Infantry Drill Regula-
tions and the Manual of Interior
Guard Duty. Their lectures consist of
talks on military courtesy, camp sani-
tation and all questions concerning
problems encountered by the men in
the practical application of the Drill
Regulations are answered, as .well as
others pertaining to military subjects.
German Toys Arrive from Holland
New York, Oct. 5.-Several thous-
and cases of German-made toys ar-
rived here today on a Dutch steam-
er. They had been purchased prior1
to the war by American importers,
and 'since then held in Amsterdam.
The toys were held in Holland
through refusal of the British gov-
ernment to authorize their shipment,
but were bought and paid for prior to
the beginning' of the war. A recent'
special authorization by the Ameri-
can state department permitted the
shipment.

murdered, a German officer should be
shot. These are methods the Hun

I

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