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October 25, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-25

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F-J1A1..i.I
Mn COOLER
DAY

LL

~r 5k iAzr

:4Aaitli

ASSOCIATEI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT -WI
SERVICE

No. 21.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1918.

PRICE THREE

VARY COUNCIL
VOF ARMISTICE
D TERMS PRESIDENT'S
PLY "STRONGEST IN
MODERN TIMES"
CLAIMS 14 PEACE
S FAVOR GERMANY

Q. MX'S TAKE CARE
OF ORDNANCE WORK
Lieutenant Stotter, quartermaster
officer of -the S. A. T. C. unit, an-
nounced yesterday that the ordnance
work necessitated by the arrival of
rifles and bayonets will be handled
by the quartermaster's department of
the S. A. T. C. The quota of rifles
has arrived and also many bayonets
of the regular field service type. Most
of the rifles are the modified Enfield
type such as is used in France, and
the remainder are Krags and Russian
infantry rifles.
Four of the modern Browning-Colt
machine guns have arrived and 16
Browning-Colt automatic rifles, a type
of light machine gun. As there are
many gun-smiths among the me-
chanics, instruction in the use and
care of the machine guns will prob-
ably be given 'to section B first, but
it is intended that eventually the men
of both sections will have a thorough
understanding of the guns.
LIST OF MICHIGAN MEN
IN SERVI E REUESTED

Premiers Declare
s Own Sentiments
Question

Answer Re-
on Peace

(By the Associated Press)y
?aris, Oct. 24.-The official com-
nt to the Associated Press on Pres-
nt Wilson's reply to Germany can
summarized as follows:
President Wilson's latest answer
olves the whole thing into a mil-
ry question, which can be decided
Foch, Haig, and Pershing."
Condon, Oct. 24.-The popular com-
nt on the President's note here is
t it contains the strongest lang-
Ke ever addressed by the head of
e great nation to another in mod-
times. The note is welcomed,
t, because it .brings matters to a
w'state; further proceedings,if there
to be further proceedings, will be
the hands of all the governments
erested. Hitherto, so far as the pub-
knows, the nations associated with
United States, and which have
re at stake, perhaps, than has the
I States, have been onlookers in'
correspondence.
Note Ends German Notes
Phe note is welcomed, secondly, be-
ise it promises to bring the season
discussion to an end altogether,
eway or an" other. No one sees how
German chancellor can fail to ac-
p PresIdent Wilson's platform or
eat it. Acceptance will be taken
mean that he Germans regard their
ition as hopeless and that disact-
is eminent.
t'he general opinion is that Ger-
ny's military position is not so bad,
t that her leaders will fight on, if
ly with the hope of creating divis-
s among the Allies, which has been
rmany's reliance of late.
Oyster Bay, Oct. 24. - Theodore
>sevelt sent duplicate telegrams
ight to United Sattes senators
Ige, Poindexter, and Johnson in
Ich he characterized as "thoroug' -
mischievous" the 14 principles en-
eated by President Wilson if they
to be made the basis of peace.
e telegrams follow in part:
Text of Telegrams
As an Anerican c'tizen I most
nestly hope that the senate of the
Ited States, which is part of the
aty making power of the United
tes, will take affirmative action
inst a negotiated peace with Ger-
ny and in favor of a peace based
the unconditional surrender of
many.
The language of the 14 points, and
subsequent statements explaining
qualifying them, is neither straig ht-
ward nor plain, but if construed in
ir probable sense many, and possi-
most of these 14 points, are thor-
hly mischievous, and if made the
us of a peace, such a peace would
resent not the unconditional sur-
lder of Germany, but the condition-
surrender of the United States.
urally they are entirely satisfac-
y to Germany, and, naturally,
tally satisfactory in this country to
ry pro-German, pacifist, Socialist,
i-American and so-called interna-
nalist."
Washington, Oct. 24. - Germany's
a for an armistice and peace now
before the Allied governments. In
ious public utterances, the pre-
rs and other leaders of the En-
te powers have repeatedly declar-
that President Wilson's statements
his address of last January 8, and
sequent addresses, reflect their
n views.
upreme War Council to Decide
omething more official and bind-
is declared now, although it is
arded here as a foregone conclu-
1 that this approval will be reg-
red, and that the offices of the su-
me war council will be invoked

PRESIDENT HUTCHINS ASKS
DENTS TO HELP IN
WORK

STU-I

Prof. Charles B. Vibbert, director
of the Michigan bureau of the Amer-
ican University Union in Europe, has
requested that the authorities of the
University furnish him at the earliest
possible date, a list of University of
Michigan men in service. In order to
aid Professor Vibbert in his great
work, President Harry B. Hutchins
desires that students file at the Alum-
nus office the names of Michigan men
whom they know to be in the service
abroad, giving in each instance; first,
the name and home address; second,
the fraternity or club affiliation;
third, the name of nearest relative
with address; fourth, the rank and
service of the person; fifth, the par-
ticular unit to which he is now at-
tached and, if known, the number of
his military postoffice; sixth, and hon-
ors conferred or accidents reported.
Any other information that may be of
interest should be included. If in
doubt as to the form in which the in-
formation should be given, students
may consult the assistant editor of the
Alumnus in Alumni Memorial hall.
The following is a quotation from
the recent letter received at the office
of the Alumnus from Professor Vib-
bert:
"You and your office could
really do nothing which would
be more valuable to our Mich-
igan men in service, than by
furnishing us with such a list"
(referring to the list above sug-
gested).
"The men are desperately anx-
ious to get in touch with one an-
other. The feeling of loneliness
and isolation of many of them,
scattered as they are among
groups of men whom they have
never before known, and receiv-
ing mail from home in a very
desolatory fashion, is extreme. If
only they could get hold of the
military mailing addresses of their
friends who are in Europe, they
might at least correspond with
one another and thus occasional-
ly make arrangements to meet old
friends. Homesickness, a most
serious malady in all armies, has
as yet fortunately not hit our men
very hard, but with the long. wint-
er before them with its inactivity
plus rain, mud, snow, and cold,
this epidemic may at any time
declare itself. Against such there
is only one sure remedy known-
letters from home and friends,
and the- occasional getting togeth-
er with comrades of other and
better times."
President Hutchins expects a gener-
al and immediate compliance with
this important request.
CAMPUS ORGANIZATIONS
All information for the Stu-
dents' Dir ectory must be mailed
to the editor, Press building,
before Saturday. Office hours of
the Directory are 10:45 to 11:45
o'clock and 2:45 to 5 o'clock.

FEARLETDO N I
FLUPRECUTIONS
PUBLIC WARNED THAT CASES
WILL INCREASE UNLESS
EFFORTS CONTINUE
DIVISION INSPECTOR PRAISES
SANITARY CONDITIONS HERE
Week-End Passes May Be Given;
Many Convaleseents at Univer-
sity Hospital
Yesterday was the best day exper-
ienced so far by the medical author-
ities in combatting the epidemic, ac-
cording to the report late last night.
Only one death occurred in the ranks
of the S. A. T. C. during the day, that
of Sergt. W. H. Graham, section B.,
Co. 3, who succumbed to pneumonia.
Lieutenant-Colonel Miller of Chica-
go, sanitary inspector of the central
division, was in town yesterday and
made a thorough inspection of the
hospitals, infirmaries, and barracks.
In a conversation with one of the
members of the medical department,
he expressed himself as being greatly
gratified with the conditions here,
adding that they were excellent as
compared With those elsewhere.
May Get Week-End Passes
Five men w.ere taken to the hos-
pitals with pneumonia and 23 were
removed from hospitals to the various
convalescent infirmaries. There is
a chance that passes will be issued
to some 'of the men who have nearly
recovered from the effects of the dis-
ease so that they may spend the com-
ing week-end at their homes. Some of
the men who were quartered in the
old Union building have been found
to have recovered to such an extent
that they were allowed to return to
their respective companies for light
work. - ..
"The people of Ann Arbor," says
Sergeant-major Fischer, "must not let
up in taking precautions merely be-
cause there are fewer new cases. Con-
ditions will not get back to where
they were unless people continue to
be careful. Facilities are being
strengthened for combatting the dis-
ease. The cots of all men who are
still sick are enclosed in cubicles as
fast as these can be made. One hund-
red were made last week and more
are being ordered."
Give Wards to Flu Patients
There are no operations being per-
formed at the University hospital un-
less they are of the type classed as
emergencies. All of the facilities of
the hospital have been placed at the
disposal of Captain Vaughan. So far,
the dermatology ward, the three floors
of the otology ward, the first floor of
the children's ward, the contagious
hospital, and the women's surgical
ward have been transformed into in-
fluenza wards, and as fast the patients
of the other departments are well
enough to permit their being dis-
charged, these wards are also being
made ready for influenza patients.
Most of the above wards which are
now occupied by flu patients are fill-
ed to capacity but many of the pati-
ents are awaiting the end of the rout-
ine time that their temperature re-
mains normal b fore they can be n o
de to Ihe inflrn~aries Oti er hospitals
are doin. like vise.
The death of Miss Deta Kauffman,
'13, at Ames Agricultural college,
Iowa, was reported today. Miss Kauff-
man was instructing in English aid
oratory at that college and contract-

ed the disease there. Miss Anna
Sanders, a student nurse at the Uni-
versity hospital died of pneumonia at
the contagious hospital Wednesday
night.
Dr. W. E. Forsythe, of the Univer-
sity health service, reports only one
new case among civilian students, al-
though five who had been previously
stricken were taken to hospitals.
POWER PLANT COAL PILE BURNS;
FORMS QUANTITIES OF GAS
The immense coal pile at the power
plant of the University has been on
fire for several days. The fire start-
ed by spontaneous combustion and
although it is not out yet the men in
charge have been fighting it continu-
ously and seem to have it confined to
a certain area. Not much of the coal
will be lost and the inconvenience of
the coal gas to those living in the
neighborhood will soon be eliminated.

NEW 0. T. C. OPENED
AT CAMP FREMONT
Captain RalphtH. Durkee announc-
ed Wednesday that a new infantry
officers' training school is to be open-
ed Dec. 1 at Camp Fremont, Cal.
This school will be oen to all draft
registrants between the ages of 18
and 46, except those in Class 1 who
registered prior to Sept. 12. ApplI-
cants must have a high school educa-
tion, or an equivalent course of in-
struction. Physical requirements are
Identical with those of general mili-
tary service.
The need for officers is so great
that only a two-months' course of in-
tensive training will be given. Michi-
gan's quota will be 572 men. Civilians
desiring to submit applications must
do so before Nov, 1. Further informa-
tion and applieation blanks can be
obtained fro S. A. T. C. headquar-
ters.
DR, 1, 6. LYNDS,'88M,
VICTIM OF INFLUENZI
FORMER MEMBER OF MEDICAL
FACULTY DIES IN MODST
OF WORK
Dr. James G. Lynd, '88M, formerly
professor of obstetrics and gynecol-
ogy in the Medical school, died at
7:20 o'clock last night at his home at
403 South Fourth street from Spanish
influenza. His sister, Miss Eleanor
Bell, and brother, Ernest, were at his
bedside when he passed away. The
body will be taken to New Bruns-
wick, Canada.
Practiced Here Since 1895
After Dr. Lynds graduated from the
,University he practiced for a short
time in Chelsea. He then became an
assistant to Dr. J. N. Martin, profes-
sor in the Medical school. After Dr.
Martin left the University, Dr. Lynds
took charge of the obstetrics and
gynecology department. Dr. Lynds re-
signed in 1895 and practiced in Ann
Arbor. He had his own hospital at
403 South Fourth street, which was
given up when his wife, Mrs. Emma
Lynds, died in 1908. Mrs. Lynds was
also a University graduate.
The deceased was 54 years old. He
was born in New Brunswick, Canada,
coming to Michigan in 1884.
He leaves three unmarried sisters
and one brother. Miss Eleanor Bell
Lynds is in charge of the English
department at the University of Vir-
ginia. Miss Lillian Lynds is at Abing-
ton, Va. Miss Marg'aret Lynds is a
normal teacher in New Brunswick,
Canada. His brother, Ernest Lynds,
is sheriff at Hopewell, New Bruns-
wick, Canada.
Successful in Entire Career
During his entire career as a doc-
tor and a surgeon he has been suc-
cessful. He attended to his patients
up to eight days ago, when he was
taken ill. He also attended the S. A.
T. C. men at the different barracks.
Dr. Lynds donated his old residence
lot to the Y. M. C. A. several years
ago. Last year the organization erect-
ed Lane hall on this site. The de-
ceased leaves a large number of Ann
Arbor friends who will always remem-
ber him as charitable, kind hearted,
and generous to everyone. He was a
heavy subscriber to all the Liberty
Loans, and contributed to several Uni-
versity funds.
VIRGIL M. KIME, '06, DIES OF
PNEUMONIA IN DETROIT HOME

Virgil M. Kime, '06, of the casualty
actuarial department of the Travelers'
Insurance company, died at his home,
33 Sherman street, Detroit, several
days ago after a short illness of bron-
chial pneumonia. Mr. Kime, after his
graduation, taught accounting for two
years in the economics department of
the University. He participated in
several of the campus activities and
organizations while attending here.
LIEUT. LEISCH TRANSFERRED
TO YALE UNIT OF S. A. T. C.
Lieut. R. W. Leisch has received
orders to report at the Yale unit of
the S. A. T. C. in the capacity of per-
sonnel adjutant. Lieutenant Leisch
has acted as personnel adjutant of
regimental headquarters on Captain
Durkee's staff. Lieutenant Crawford,
former commander of the third bat-
talion, succeeds Lieutenant Leisch.

TEUTONS FLOOD BELGIUM LOW LANDS
IN ATTEMPT TO DELAY ALLIED RUSH
BRITISH PUSH ON TOWARD MAUBEU

Hun Newspaper
Slips iyCensor
"Private's Number," the October is-
sue of the Gargoyle, will be published
tomorrow. This number will be
unique in that it is the first real
military number, and also because it
is the first to be edited by a member
of the faculty. Mr. Edward S. Ever-
ett, instructor in rhetoric, worked on
the Gargoyle when he was an under-
graduate in the University and now
holds the position of editor-in-chief.
He has contributed much to the Gar-
goyle during the past six years in the
way of drawings and editorials.
The S. A. T. C. is to co-operate in
the sale of the magazine. Sergeant-
major Fischer has detailed men to sell
copies to the S. A. T. C. men at the
noon hour, and a certain percentage
of the proceeds from every copy sold
will go to the S. A. T. C. funds.
A special feature is a German news-
paper. It is supposed that Chairman
George Creel, of the committee on
public information, will be subjected
to the severest attacks from the press
and congress for not having foreseen
that the Gargoyle would print this
{material.
The number is full of quips about
the S. A. T. C. The privates of course
receive most attention, but the officers
cannot be kept out of the Gargoyle
any more than they can be kept out
of a German. trench. The poets have
been as busy as usual, and the Gar-
goyle contains a number of gems of
thought. One poet has described in
words that the world will not willing-
ly let die the fascination that a sold-
ier exerts over a modest maiden. An-
other poet has written a poem about
the President's trousers. Not perhaps
the best subject in the world for a
poem, but if Mr. Wilson does not ob-
Ject it must be all right.
The Gargoyle staff wants both ar-
tists and writers. The war has taken
so many of the men, that there is
more opportunity than usual for new
men to find a place. Men of the S.
A. T. C., who can write of humorous
happenings of barrack life from the
inside, will find a particularly warm
welcome.
MEDICS NOT PAID
FOR FIGHTING FLU
There have been many reports
around the campus to the effect that
the senior medics are being paid $100
a month and $4 a day 'expenses for
the work that they are doing in the
present epidemic. The seniors are
not being paid a cent for their work,
which is entirely voluntary, nor are
there any in any other town doing
health service work. They are all
here at school with the exception of
about 25 men who are assigned week-
ly by Major Wile to report to Cap-
tain Vaughan for duty In the different
infirmaries.
These men are changed every week
and their work is so arranged that
they may attend their afternoon clin-
ics and most of their morning work.
Twice a day when the doctors in
charge of the infirmaries make their
rounds the medics who are in the re-
spective houses make the rounds like
an interne in a hospital and. call spe-
lcal attention to the men who are in
the worst condition. This expedites
the work of the physicians and allows

them to attend to many more cases
than they could otherwise do. -
The doctors who have been in
charge have the highest praise for
the men who have been helping them.
The medics are not given any author-
ity to administer drugs except in the
case of an emergency so that another
rumor to the effect that the medics
are practicing on the men can be dis-
counted at the fame time. There are
usually two men in each infirmary at
all times and they work on 12-hour
ishifts.

AUSTRO - HUNGARIAN GOVE1
MENT TO SURRENDER, STATES
DUTCH DISPATCH
ENTENTE AVIATORS CU'
HUN TROOP FORMATION
Yanks Gain North of Grandpre; Bo
Evacuates SlavignyMont.
cornet Positions
BULLETIN
(By the Associated Press)
Amsterdam, Oct. 24-The speedy
unconditional surrender of the
Austro-Hungarlan monarchy is
probable, according to a Vienna
dispatch to the Frankfort Gazette
(By the Associated Press)
London, Oct. 24.-The British troo
have overcome the enemy along t
whole front between the Sambre car
and the Scheldt river, and their
vance is being continued, Field Me
shal Haig reports from headquartE
tonight. Since yesterday morning t
British have taken 7,000 prisoners a
more than 100 guns.
(By the Associated Press)
Archangel, Oct. 24,-American a
British forces yesterday repuls
heavy attacks by the Bolshevik infa
try against advance Allied positi
on the Dvina front.
Bolshevik Boats Shell Yanks
Bolshevik gun boats heavily shell
the Americans and British for s
hours. In counter attacks the Ang
American troops inflicted heavy loi
es on the enemy and captured pr
oners.
(By the Associated Press)
On several of the most Importa
sectors in France, from the region
Valenciennes to the east of Le Cate
north of Laon between the Oise a
Serre rivers, and on the front frn
the Meuse river to the vicinity
Grandpre, battles of sanguinary cl
acter are being fought. In these t
British, French, and American troo
everywhere are making progre
against the stubbornly resisting G,
mans.
Germans Flood Belgium Flats
In Belgium the Allied forces, o
ing to the rapid retreat of the ener
and the flooded condition of the 10
lands, have not yet been able to co
into full fighting 'contact with t
Germans, but doubtless a few da
more will see them again hard afi
their quarry and driving him, fartb
toward his own frontier.
South of Valenciennes the tBriti
third and fourth armies, with whi
Americans are co-operating, ha
continued to press onward succe
fully with Mons and Maubeuge
their objectives. Valenciennes
gradually being enveloped and so
is destined to be pinched out of t
fighting line by turning moveme
from the north and south.
British Aviators Damage. Formatk
The Germans in this region cnt:
ue to use numerous machine guns
retard the advance of Field Mars
Haig's men, and the artillery on b(
sides is violently active. British av
tors are materially aiding the of
sive by dropping bombs behind I
lines, or flying low and cutting try
formations to {pieces with machi
gun fire.
South of the Oise river the Frel
are making sharp thrusts against I
enemy with the intention of clear!
(Continued on Page Four)
ORGANIZATIONS, NOTICEi

Organizations and boards of
officers of societies which wish
their pictures to appear in the
Michiganensian war annual
must have their prints at the
Michiganensian offices before
Nov. 15. Nothing will be ac-
cepted for the book after these
dates unless special arrange-
ments are made immediately
with the editor, who will be in
the offices daily from 2:30 to
4:30 o'clock, phone 16-J.

I

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