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June 07, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-06-07

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v -; LI
IBLY THUNDER
SHO WERS j

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0ki rn

~Iai ti

ASSOC]
PRI
DAY AND N]

SERI~YCE

179.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JUNE 7, 1919.

PRICE

m

ALS IN THREE 1
IENTS QUALIFY
ER AND BUIKHOLDER PLACE
FOR FINALS HELD'
TODAY
HURDLES WILL
BE CLOSE FINISH.

ors Wolverines to
Dark Horse
Cuts In

Win If No1

(By Associated Press)
go, June 6.-Trials held today
events for tomorrow's West-
iference track and field meet
tle indication of probable win-
The track was slow, due to
[cMahon, of Nebraska, won the
eat of the 440-yard dash :49
er trials were in the 880-yard
i the javelin throw.
Results of 440
rd run-First heat, won by
Chicago; Butler, Michigan,
Time :50 4-5. Second heat,
Oss, Minnesota; Emery, Illi-
cond. Time :51. Third heat,
McMahon, Nebraska; Barlow,
i, second. Time :49 4-5.
six qualified for finals.
n throw-Five qualified: Wil-
nois, 163 feet, 11 1-2 inches;
Ohio, 157 feet, 6 3-4 inch-
:e Iowa, 155 feet, 9 inches;
t, Illinois, 154 feet, 4 inches;
Illinois 152 feet, 6 1-2 inches.
Burkholder in Half
rd run, two heats, four to
in each. First heat, won by
Licago; Marian, Ames, second;
ber, Ohio, third; Burkholder,
n fourth. Time 2:00 2-5. Sec-
: won by Brown. Illinois; Wat-.

in

Year Books For
Sale In U Hall
In what is the largest volume by
200 pages that it has ever been print-
ed in before, the 1919 Michiganensian
War Record goes on sale today in the
office in University hall. In spite of
the difficulties attendant on the publi-
cation, it is said to cover every phase
of University life 'completely.
The book contains in all 862 pages
and is bound in khaki with blue and
gold cover embossing. An individual
picture of every man in the S. A. T.
C. and Naval unit is in the volume as
well as 'the name of every man in the
University.
One of the particularly noteworthy
facts concerning the book is that it is
the first college annual to be published
this year, many institutions having
decided to suspend publication or to
hold the work over until the summer.
The Board of Regents of the Univer-
sity has already purchased 500 copies
to besdistributed among the high
schools of the state.
Vlulgarians)7'arch
On Serbian Front
Copenhagen, June 6.-A part of the
Bulgarian army has been mobilized
and is marching toward the Serbian
frontier, the Balkan news agency re-
ports. Reports that the Bulgarian
army was secretly 'mobilizing on the
Serbian frontier has been received in
this country several times during the
past three months. The purpose of
the mobilization was never explained
nor have recent dispatches indicated
any reason for strife between Bul-
#garia and Serbia. The reported move-
'sent of the Bulgarians may have some
'connection with the peace terms, as
anticipated from Bulgaria. The Bul-
barian treaty has not yet been com-
pleted by the peace conference.
New State Law To
Affect Engineers
According to a bill recently passed
by both houses of the State Legisla-;
'ture and signed by the Governor, all
'architects, engineers, and surveyors,
must be registered before practicing
in Michigan. The bill was written
and introduced by Prof. Emil Lorch,
Prof. C. T. Johnston, and Mr. Gardi-
ner S. Williams.
Men who have practiced one of these
professions for a period of more than
two years before the bill becomes a]
law may apply for registraion with-
out examination Others must show
that they have had experience inI
their work for a period of 'six years,a
either in combined training and prac-o
tical work or all in practical work. It9
s further provided that all public
work in the fields named be done by4
qualified met.
With the passing of this bill the
Architects registration bill, which has
been effective for the past four years,
is repealed.
LOST ONES TO EAT LE6O* AT
SENIOR WOMEN'S BREAKFAST'
The annual breakfast for senior
women will be given two weeks from
this morning at Helen Newberry res-
idence And will follow the house par-c
ty to be held the night before.
Emma Riggs has been appointedE
toastmistress and those who will re-l
spond to' toasts are :Dean Myra B. Jor-
dan, Martha Guernsey, Lucile Duff, and
Emily Loman. True to tradition, the
customary lemon will be passedt
aroundmand the girls who have pledg-
ed themselves to succumb to matri-
mony will eat thereof.
All junior girls 'who desire to serve
at the breakfast are asked to commu-
'icate with Emily Powell at Nwberry

residence,
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
Students desiring to become .1
candidates for the Rhodes schol-
arships should consult Dean Al-
fred H. Lloyd, chairman of the
University committee, as soon
as possible.

PROF. E. R. SUNDERLAND
GIVES FIRST S P E E C H
"The Michigan Chimes" Necessary to
Meet New Conditions
- McAllister
Nearly 150 students from the staffs
of all the University publications and
members of the Board in Control sat
down to their banquet last night in
the Michigan Union. Dean John R.
Effinger presided as toastmaster.
Prof. Edson R. Sunderland was the
first called on for a toast, "The Pub-
lications." He told some of his rem-
iniscences of The Daily in the early
days of the sheet and contrasted the
limited scope of the publications in
his time with the large and efficient
work done by them today.
NcAllister Talks on New Paper
Thomas F. McAllister, '21L, speak-
ing on the new magazine, "The Michi-
gan Chimes," laid stress on the influ-
ence that the Chimes would exert on
University opinion. He stated that
the publication would be a necessary
factor in the successful meeting of un-
precedented conditions caused by the
war.
"A New Outlook" was the subject
of the talk by Prof. W. Gordon Ston-
er, who has but recently returned
from service. He declared the neces-
sity for limited work on the campus
so that a man's efforts can be the best
of which he is capable.
Carey Outlines Plans
Harry M. Carey, '20, managing edi-
tor-elect, outlined the plans for "Next
Year's Daily." He told how the edi-
torial policy of the paper would be
placed in the hands of five men in-
stead of one and how double column
editorials will be printed. Carey said'
he believed a well-organized staff was
more important than mere good writ-
ing and told how he formed his up-
per staff with this idea in view.
* The Daily staff for next year will be1
as follows: news editor, Mark K.
Ehlbert; city editor, Chester Camp-
bell; editoriar boad, Paul Shinkman,
Charles Osius, William Clarkson, and
William F.- Angell; sports editor,
Pembroke Hart; telegraph editors, J.
E. McManis and' Joseph Bernstein;,
women's editor, Marguerite Clark;
guillotine editor, Kendrick Kimball;'
music editor, Edna L. Apel; literary
editor, Mary D. Lane; exchange edi-
tor, Josephine H. Waldo; efficiency!
editor, Renaud Sherwood; campaign
editor, Hugh W. Hitchcock; staff lar-
toonist, Stanley Simpson.1
Business Staff Assistants
The assistants on the business staff
will be as follows: advertising mana-
ger, Legrand A. Gaines; issue mana-
ger, Maik B. Covell; circulation man-
ager, Donnedl R. 'Schoffner; publi-
cation manager, Robert E. McKean;
office manager, Henry Whiting II. t
Prof. Fred N. Scott gave the final
talk of the evening. He spoke partic-
ularly on the relations between the
faculty and The Daily and told some
of the mistakes in the sheet which
especially invoke the wrath of the
professors. ,
Gargoyle Staff .
The Gargoyle staff as announced for
next year is as follows: literary edi-
tor, Kelsey Guilfoil; humor editor,1
Kendrick Kimball; art editor, S. S.
Weiner; credit manager, Robert Grind-<
ley; advertising manager, Sydney Sar-
asohn; circulation manager, Marvel
D. Hicks.I

ALL PUBLICATION
DINNER ATTENDED
BY 150 STUDENTS

DEAN

JOHN R. EFFINGER
TOASTMASTER OF
EVENING

IS

LEADER OF BAVARIAN
REVOLT IS EEUE

MICHIGAN SHOWS HER SPIRIT TODAY
Today is the last baseball game of the season.
We are going to play Illinois. As far as the Conference cham-
pionship goes, the game will not count. Whether we win or lose
will make no difference-we will head the Conference.
But just because the game will not affect our standing in the
Conference, we must not believe that we should stay away from Fer-
ry field this afternoon and not turn out to support the team.
Let every Michigan man be on hand today to help finish the
season for one of the finest teams we have ever had. Let the team
know that Michigan is behind it to the end.
There is another reason why we should all e there today. Last,
Saturday Illinois gave our team the greatest example of college spirit
it was possible to give.
Michigan was given a royal welcome, and the fact that she won,
not only the game, but also the title away from her opponents, did
not damper that welcome in the slightest degree.
Illinois the loser stood up and cheered Michigan the' winner.
Could anything be more magnificient than this kind of spirit?
Today, Michigan is going to show Illinois that this spirit was
not unappreciated. Illinois is going to get a welcome even greater
than Michigan did at Champaign. We are going to show Illinois that .
when it comes to college spirit Michigan is inferior to none.
The Illini are our guests today, and we are proud to have them.
Whether they win or lose the game this afternoon, our attitude to-
ward them will be the same.
We extend to them the hand of welcome, of friendship, and of ad-
miration. They are true sportsmen, and our desire today is to show
them that we are no less so.
Every true son of Michigan, who takes pride in Michigan spirit
as one of her greatest assets, will be at the ball game today.

LEVINE NISSEN BELIEVED
OF MUNICH SOVIET
REGIME

HEAD

r, has
vstemn

e track and in the
s Eligible
Howe reported that
red is eligible, so
protestations at the

ne of the most closely
he track events is the
e. Winner of first honors
sticks will have the sat-
winning against a field
ents. Johnson won this
year's western intercol-
and is the favorite 'so
However he has to
race of his career to
p the dope as it stands
an appears to have the
around team, but it re-
seen whether the Wol-
,ther enough points to
he others. The one fear
of the less dangerous
whole, have one or two
a cut in on the events
is counting on,
WIDE WIRE
E PENDING
ssociated Press)
June 6.-President S.
p of the Commercial
Union of America an-
;t that he would call a
rike of members of the
saching Chicago tomor-
I that neither the date
d 'walk-out, nor whether
t both the Postal tele-
bMe company nor the
n telegraph and 'cable
>een decided.
President Konenkamp
e called in support of
s of the Western Union
d southeastern states
nested by him to leave
st night following the
er of Postmaster Burle-
re systems of the com-
,te operation.

BIRTHDAY CO1
OF MU SICA L
ENDS -SCHOOl
EVERY NUMBER FROM
LAST IS WEL
RECEIVED
AUDIENCE, CAPTI
BY CHASE B. S

(By Associated Press)
Mnich, June 6.-Levine Nissen, the
bolshevik agitator, who was one of the
leaders of the Munich communist so-
viet regime, was executed at noon
Thursday at Stadelheim, outside of
the capitol. He was convicted yes-
terday,, and the Bavarian cabinet re-
fused to commute his sentence, main-
tainingthat he was the cause of the
civil war in Bavaria and deserved no
mercy.
Probably Levien
It seems probable that Levine Nis-
sen is identical with the bolshevik
leader Levien, who has figured .so
prominently in the prels dispatches
in connection with the Munich soviet
regime.,
London, June 6.-The execution in
Munich of Levine Nissen is resulting
in unrest throughout Germany, ex-
change telegraph dispatch from Co-
penhagen says. The majority social
ists are jtining a strike movement be-
gun by the soldiers' and workers'
counciland executive committees of
the_ Greater Berlin factors have pro-
tested against the sentence of the Ba-
varian communist.
Strikes Occurring
Strikes have occurred In Nuremberg
and Munich. A strike at Leipzig has
resulted in street fighting. The Ger-
man government, it is added, is mak-
ing military preparations in Berlin
and elsewhere.
GRADUATION INVITATIONS OF
LITS OBTAINABLE NEXT WEEK
Senior literary commencement in-
vitations and announcements will be
given out from 2 to 5 o'clock on Fri-
day and Saturday afternoons, June 13
and 14, in the booth in University
hall. These are the only times that
invitations can be obtained as the
committee is busy at other times.
If the invitations should fail to ar-
rive, a notice will be posted on the
bulletin board in U-hall.

PROGRAM FOR RETURNING.
ALUMNI LIKE =PAST ONES
ALL CLASSES REGISTER MONDAY,
JUNE 21, AT ALUXNI
HALL
Essentially the same program as in
previous years will be prepared for
the alumni who are to return for the
University's 75th annual commence-
ment week. Most of the classes are
expected to arrive Monday, June 23,
when registration opens in Alumni.
Memorial hall. Class day exercises
for the law school will be held at 2
o'clock Monday in room C of the Law
building. At 9 o'clock Monday even-
ing the graduating classes of all the
schools and.colleges will hold the an-
.nual senior reception and ball.
Refnlon Day, Tuesday
Tuesday, June 24, is to be reunion
day for all the classes that are com-
ing back in force. The reunions will
be held at 8 o'clock in the morning.
The Board of Regents will meet at
9:30 o'clock. At 10 o'clock class day
exercises will be given for the College
of Literature, Science, and the Arts
[and for the Colleges of Engineering
and Architecture. The annual senior
girls' play will be presented at 8
o'clock on the campus. The usual
student entertainment under the au-
spices of the Michigan Union will be
held1 at 8:30 o'clock in Hill audi-
torium where the entire lower floor
will be reserved for the alumni.
Wednesday is Alumni day. The an
nual alumni meeting is to be held at
9:30 o'clock in the University club.
room Alumni Memorial hall. The
alumni luncheon will be served at
12:15 o'clock in Barbour gymnasium
by the Collegiate Alumnae association.
The huge "victory mass meeting" will
commence at 1:30 o'clock in Hill
auditorium, at which President Harry
B. Hutchins is to preside.
Noted Speakers
Among the speakers will be ex-am-
bassador Sharp, Major Edwin Denby,
U. S. M. C. of Detroit, and Prof. Rene
Talamon, who served four years in
the French army. In the evening, the
Varsity band will give its concert on
the campus following which will be
the senior promenade
Thursday, June 26, is commence-
ment day and the usual exercises are
to be preceded as in former years by
the commencement procession.

Jazz Octet and Varsity Quartet Si
with Characteristli Zest
and Snap
(M. W<.
All the good things come last, thi
say, and last night proved no exc)
tion when the Varsity Glee and Ma2
dolin club gave its annual concert:
Hill auditorium. The school year wa
fittingly closed by the presentatic
of a long and varied program, aud Ui
large audience seemed highly pleas
with it all.
Every number, from the ope it
"Laudes Atque Carmina" to the do
ing "Star Spangled Banner," was WE
received, and encores were numero
If the Glee and Mandolin was ev
in danger of dying, it was not notic
able in the "birthday concert."
Sikes Individual Star
The individual star of the even;i
was Chase B. Sikes, '17, a fortnerli
club leader, who captured his aud
ence at once, and held it through b
allotted numbers. The only regret W
that there were not more .f thex
Sikes has a clear, strong voice, and
manner of putting a song across tba
well accounts for the name he hi
made for himself in the University.
The jazz octet was perhaps the ne:
best-liked act. Audiences never see:
to tire of this popular form of musi
and thee kind handed out last nig
was just the kind to justify the ci
for "more."
Varsity Quartet Sings
The Varsity quartet, composed0
Wilson, Walser, Nash, Kemp, of "Con
On, Dad" fame, sang their numbe2
with the same zest and snap that dii
tinguished their work in the oper;
"My Lover" seems to sound bett
every time one hears it. Nash ahs
mng a solo which showeda his go
voice to good advantage.
The Midnight Sons' quartet and t
Varsity Stringed sextet were the ri
maining numbers on the program, an
it was hardtotdecide which the cro
liked the better.
Interest in Two Clubs
The main interest of the evenin
however, centered in the work o
by the combined clubs. The best nun
ber played by the Mandolin club wa
"A la bien aimee." This is a real te
for any organization, and the mann
in which it was played last night wA
a treat. If a criticism may be offei
ed, it is that an audience does n'
like to hear a piece repeated for a
encore, especially a long piece.
would much prefer a new and diffe
ent selection.
The most impressive number of ti
whole program was the "LaNd
Hope and Glory," sung by the Gli
club ensemble; with Robet McCai
dliss as soloist. This really fine marc
of Elgar's was given a splendid re
dition by Mr. Harrison's songster
and reflects great credit on his abi
ity as a leader.
Training Brought Out
There were two other numbers thi
stand out in the Glee club, shareh
the program.' These were -My Lad
Chlo," and "Mister Boogaman." ,Il
both of them, the club shows the ca
ful training given them by their d
rector, and the credit for :their se
cess should be equally divided betwe
the two.
After the concert, the combinE
clubs gave a dance at the Union whic
was well attended. Altogether It id
a big night for the Glee and Mandoll
club, and one of which it may be Jus
ly proud.

I 1

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
SUNDAY, 6:80 P. M.
PROP. T. E. RANKIN. speaks
"THE BIBLE AND OTHER BOOKS"

i

COMEDY CLUB TRYOUT
Comedy club tryouts will be
held from 9 to 1 o'clock this
morning in the auditorium of
University hall. Tryouts are
advised to bring material, al-
though this is not necessary.

Dr. Stouffer to Address Con'
Dr. C. B. Stouffer, of the Univ
Health service, will address the
,ent-teachers' convention to be
June 12 in Ypsilanti. He will
on "The Worth of the Baby." The
vention is held in the interest
j child welfare work.

*1

I

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