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June 06, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-06-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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.No. 178.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 6, 1919.

PRimE THREEm

AN-ABOrICIGNFRDAJUE . 91. D fl n P ~

.s+FD

I KILLED IN
EXPLOSION;
ORE INlJUED

KESBARRE, PA., IS SCENE OF
LATEST MINING
TRAGEDY
)RT CIRCUIT RAUSES
kTAL POWDER BLAST
ter Occurred in Tunnel Through
Which Men Were Riding on
Way to Work
(By Associated Press)
kesbarre, Pa., June 5. - Eighty-
men dead and 50 others burned
naimed, many of whom will die
9 toll of a disaster in the Balti-
Tunnel of the Delaware and
>n coal company in the east end
n of this city early today. Seven,
of black powder, 300 pounds in
era detonated and the dead and
ed were literally roasted by the
hieated gas flames following the+

LATE WIRE BRIEFS.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, June 5.- Postmaster
General Burleson today issued an or-
der returning the telephone and tele-
graph systems of the country to pri-
vate ownership effective immediately.
In a statement accompying the
formal order the postmaster general
declared that the existing rates would
remain in effect and that orders for-
bidding discharge of employees be-
cause of union affiliations also would
stand.
f
Paris, June 5.-Premier Orlando of
Italy, conferred with Premier Clem-
enceau today on the Adriatic ques-
tion. La Liberte says that indications
were today that a settlemept of the
Fiume question was near. The full
claims of the Jugo-Slavs it adds prob-
ably will not be met. The paper says
that, Dalmatia will go to Italy while
the Jugo-Slavs will get the port of.
Sebenico.

Addresses by prominent educators,
receptions, Class Day exercises, lunch-
eons, alumni meetings, entertain-
ments, and a concert are a few of the
activities other than the Commence-
ment exercises planned for Com-
mencement week.
Senior Girls Plan Party
A house party on Friday night June
20, at Newberry residence, for all se-
nior girls will herald the busy week.
Arrangements should be made for the
affair with Emily Powell at Newberry
residence. The morning after the
house party a breakfast will be given
for all senior girls at the same dor-
RECORD 0SUMMER
SCHOOL PREDICTED

mitory. Hope Keeler has charge of
the breakfast.
Baccalaureate Sunday Evening
The baccalaureate address will be
given at 8 o'clock Sunday evening. Lit
seniors will meet at 7:30 o'clock at
Tappan hall and the other seniors
will. assemble near their respective
buildings. The officers of the senior
classes of the various colleges urge
every '19 man and woman to attend
this address. The attendance in past
years has not been up to standard
and it is hoped that each college will
be well represented this year.
A senior reeption at 8:20 o'clock
Monday night, June 23, is expected to
draw the largest crowd of any of the
entertainments of the week. Tickets
may be obtained at the Union Tues-
day, June 17. E. M. Miller has charge
of the arrangements. It will be sum-
mer formal.
Class Day Functions Tuesday
At 10 o'clock Tuesday morning the
class day exercises will begin on the
campus. A platform will be erected
near the Library building. The men
will banquet at noon at the Union.
Tickets for the banquet may be se-
cured Monday, June 16, at the Union.
Senior girls will be the guests at
an All-alumnae luncheon at 12:20
o'clock Tuesday at Martha Cook dor-
mitory. Tickets may be obtained from
Dean Myra B. Jordan, at Martha
Cook, or at Newberry. The annual
meeting of the alumnag and the senior
girls will be held at 2 o'clock at Mar-
tha Cook.
Band Concert Planned

75th Annual Commencement Week
Program And exercises Announced

PROF. SCOTT GIVEN
NEW APPOINTMENT
Prof. F. N. Scott has been appoint-
ed correspondent at Michigan of the
Modern Language Research associa-
tion of Great Britain, a society found-
ed for the encouragement of advanced
study in modern languages and litera-
tures The association is planning to
undertake, on an extensive scale, the
publication of original work and the
establishment of fellowships and schol-
arships. The president of the associa-
tion for 1918-19 is the noted Shake-
spearian scholar, Sir Sidney Lee.
Several of the faculty of this Univer-
sity are members.
CANDIDACIES OPEN FOR
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
NEW REGULATIONS SETS FOUR
NOMINEES AS MICHIGAN'S
QUOTA

MUSICAL CLUWIPA
CONCERT TO!

FINAL

TOUCHES PUT 0)
60TH ANNIVERSARY
CONCERT

El Paso, June 5.-La Patria leading
Mexican newspaper published here is-
sued an extra today saying Chihauhau
City was taken by Generals Angeles
and Villa, after only two hours of
fighting last Sunday. The information
is said to have come by wire from,
Laredo from refugees who fled from
Chihuahua City. It is said Villa exe-
cuited eight men on taking possession
of the city.

a
s
f
i
:
i

Large Attendance Is Expected
Department
Beads

TICKETS TO BE ON Si
FROM 10 TO 5 O'CI
Management Decides Org"nI
Will Appear in White
Flannels
Tickets will be on 'sale at Hil
torium from 10 until s o'clock
for the 60th Anniversary con
the Varsity Glee and Mandoll
which will be held-at.8 o'clo'
night.
Will Appear in Flanneli
An eleventh hour decision 1
management changed the plane
club so that it will appear i
nels, the summer garb of the 4
nation. It had been planned I
the club appear in evening dr
gardless of the season because
the first concert of the year, t
exceptionally hot weather make
arrangement unadvisable. The
agement decided that the club
appear to better advantage in
drss

by

PRES. HARRY B. HUTCHINS
TELLS ADVANTAGES OF TERM

ie tragedy occurred while the men'
on their way to work this morn-
Owing to their working places
g two miles fromthe mouth of
tunnel the men were making the
in a train of 14 mine cars, drawn
a electric motor, the powder be-
carried in two cars in the middle:
he train
Short Circuit Causes 'Blast
.e train had penetrated the tun-
about 200 feet when August Rud-
one of the survivors, states the
head trolley wire sagged and
hing a steel powder keg, formed
ort circuit. In an instant there
a shower of sparks and a terrific
. .A great 'sheet of flames drawn
tie air current enveloped the
less men who were huddled close
gether in the cars with no pos-
chance to escape.
ing to the ventilating system, the
.e and flames were drawn inward
the first intimation of the disas-
o those on the surface were the
ks of anguish of the injured.
Tunnel Strewn with Bodies
.en rescuers first entered the tun-
hey found the dead and dying
in heaps in the cars and along
unnel. Bodies of the dead were
ad to a crisp. Of the dead, 69
found in the tunnel and 14 others{
inbed to their injuries att the
tals. Only 49 have been identi-.

URGES INTERVENTION
IN HUNGARY By ALLIES
DOCTOR BAUER LEAVES VIENNA
TO MEET RENNER AT
FELDKIRCH
(By Associated Press)
Vienna, June 5.-Allied intervention
in Hungary was urged by Count Ju-
lius Andrassy, former Austro-Hun-
.garian foreign minister in a statement
today. The count in company with
other exiled Hungarians is endeavor-
ing to put' down the communist gov-
ernrent.
} Allied Help Only Hope ,
"The only thing left for us is allied:
help," the count said. "It is useless
to treat .with the communists. Every
day delayed means greater 'ruin for
us, and a loss for the whole world.
It will be 50 years before we can'
undo the waste caused by the com-
munists. Every bank is bankrupt,
every rich man impoverished, and
every industry ruined."

Faculty opinion is unanimous that
the summer session of 1919 will be
the most successful in every way com-
pared with those of former years. With
indications pointing toward an unprec-
edented attendance1 plans are com-
plete for the opening of the session
with registration on June 27. In this
year's session, the courses are more
varied, the faculty enlarged, and ac-
commodations bettered in many ways.
Record Enrollment Expected
President Harry B. Hutchins says
of this year's summer term "Indica-
tions are that the enrollment at the
coming summer session will be a rec-
ord breaking one. The opportunities of-
fered will be such as tp attract large
numbers, Many courses will be in the
charge of heads of departments and
several men of distinction from other
universities will be on the summer
faculty. For earnest work the sum-
mer term offers advantages that in
some respects are superior to those
of the regular session. The sections
are smaller and opportunities for in-
dividdal instruction are all that could
be desired."
Chance to Trim Ragged Record
Dean John R. Effinger views the
coming opportunity for summer work!
as a valuable means toward remedy-
ing low marks caused by war irregu-
larities. "As a means of clearing up
a ragged record ;caused by war ab-
sences or the unsettled University
conditions of the S. A. T. C., the
value of this year's summer session
is without question," he said. "Corre-
spondencenpromises an unusually
large attendance."
That the war has stimulated an un-
usual interest in education and con-
sequent taking advantage of all op-
portunities to secur it, is the opinion
of Dean E. H. Kraus. "The 26th sum-
mer session bids fair to be - the larg-
est in the history of the University,"
he said. "Never before has such in-
terest been displayed in the coming
work, both by students and. outsid-
ers. The war has proved conclusive-
ly the need for trained educated work-
ers. The session expects an unprece-
dented attendance."
Many Expected in Law School
"Indications 'in the Law school point
toward an unusually large attendance
in this year's summer session," said
Dean Henry M. Bates. "The number
of students in the regular session
alone who have signified their inten-
(Continue an Page Six)

There are three entertainments
planned for Tuesday evening. A con-
cert by Varsity band will begin at
7 o'clock. Everyone is invited to an
entertainment at Hill auditorium at
8:30 o'clock and the Senior Girls'
play will be given at 8:45 o'clock.
- A victory and memorial meeting
will be held in Hill auditorium at 2
o'clock Wednesday, June 25. All guests
of seniors are invited. Another band
concert will be played at 7 o'clock on
the campus. Seniors will form in the
same positions as in the Swing-out
for the annual Promenade at 8:30
o'clock. Immediately after the Prom-
enade a Senate reception will be held
in Alumni Memorial hall. This will
be the last time that the seniors will
have an opportunity to meet the fac-
ulty and introduce their parents and
friends to them. The senior men will
meet at 10:20. o'clock after the recep-
tion.
Bugle to Aksemble Class
A bugle call will'sassemble the de-
parting class of '19 at 8:15 o'clock
Thursday and the commencement pro-
cession will start at 8:30 o'clock. The9
exercises are scheduled for 10 o'clock.
Seniors are requested to wear their+
caps and gowns during the entirej
week. Commencement tickets may
be secured by applying at Registrar+
Hall's office now and they will be
ready for distribution June 23. Pro-a
grams explaining all the activities of
the week are now to be had by the{
lits at' Secretary Smith's office. Se-
niors of the other colleges may get the
programs at the offices of their re,
spective secretaries.1
MICHIGAN TECHNIC'
TO APPEAR TODAYl
Illustrated with more than 75 cuts, '
the last and one of the largest issues

For the purpose of selecting four
candidates from the University to be
recommended for appointment to the
Rhodes scholarships, President Harry
B. Hutchins has appointed a commit-
tee consisting of Dean Alfred H.
Lloyd, of the Graduate . school, as
chairman; Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of
the political science department, and
Dean Edward H. Kraus, of the Summer
school.
Four Candidates from MichigAn
The University is entitled to four
candidates under the new regulation,
and they will be among those students
which the other colleges and univer-
sities of the state choose as their can-
didates. From this entire number tw'o
will then be chosen for the scholar-
ships.
Must Obtain Forms
All students interested are'advised
to consult Dean Lloyd at once so as to
obtain the form in which their claims
for consideration should be presented.
The former qualifying examination
has been abolished and candidates
will now be selected on the showing
they are able to make before the com-
mittee which has charge of the ap-
pointments from the state of Michi-
gan.
ALUMNI CAN GET
LOW RAIL RATES

Finishing Touches Put 0
A special rehearsal of the a
ed Glee and Mandolin club he
night in Hill auditorium put the
ing touches on the excellent pr
that has been worked up. Th
night serenade also helped to
off the numbers. Only the Mi
congs were used in the so
however, and the concert piec
entirely new. Fifteen -numb4
planned that the program wi
well balanced and not long e
to be tiresome, will constitute
evening's entertainment.
Variety in Entertainment
There will be plenty of vari
asmuch as there are several
besides the complete club. Th
sity Quartet, the Midnight
Quartet, the Varsity String
the Jazz octet, the Fussers'
Chase B. Sikes, '17, ex-leader
others will add a touch of var
the performance. All the music
is melodious and appealing, acs
to the directors. Both popula
higher class selections are on
program.
Choice Numbers on Progra
Robert J. McCandliss, '21M,
(Continued on Page Six)
.Nine Junior Lip
Join Druid Raj

stant General Manager Bueha-'
the Delaware and Hudson Coal
ny after investigation at the
of the disaster gave it as his
n that a steel bar or drill car-
y one of the men came in con-
vith the overhead wire and
I the short circuit. According
company's figures 143 men and
were being carried by the train.
LICATION MEN.
[LL DINE TONIGHT
ght will be the last opportunity
npus journalists to get together
ear, the occasion being the all-
ation banquet, to be held at
Eck at the Union. The affair is
mbers, men and women, of the
of all the campus publications.
iJohn R. Effinger is to preside
stmaster and Professors Edson
nderland, Gordon Stoner and
J. Scott will respond to toasts,
1 also Thomas F. McAllister,
ditor of the new Michigan
I, and Harry M. Carey,.'20, man-
editor-elect of The Michigan

Bauer and Renner Meet at FEldkirch
Vienna, June 5. - Dr.' Otto Bauer,
Austrian foreign minister,, left here
tonight for Feldkirch, where he will
meet Dr. Renner, head of the - Aus-
trian peacerdelegation, who is com-
ing from Paris.
Cabinet Undecided
The cabinet is undecided whether
to accept the peace terms so far as
they have been received. President'
Seitz, Dr. Bauer and other members.
of the cabinet, however, individually
are joining the newspaper chorus
which declares that the terms are not
acceptable, There are indications on
the other hand that this attitude has
been adopted for public purposes only.
JUNE 14 SET FOR SUBMISSION
OF OPERA SCENARIOS TO UNION

Round trip tickets costing one and
one-thirds the regular single fare
may be purchased by alumni who are
contemplating attending the reun-
ions during Commencement week, pro-
vided they return over the same route-
that they come.
To obtain this special rate, certif-
icates must be secured at the point
of departure which will be validated
during days of meeting, June 22 to 26
inclusive, here at offices of the Alum-
ni association. Mr. Wilfred B. Shaw,
secretary of the Alumni association,
believes that families of the seniors
can be benefited by this plan, but they
must be sure to have tickets validated
at Ann Arbor.
These tickets must be used between
June 19 and 22, and used to return
between June 26 and 29. Mr. Shaw
telegraphed New York to make ar-
rangements with the New York rail-
road offices and details in New York
were looked after by Henry W. Web-
ber, secretary of '941.
FIFTEEN MEMBERS OF HOUSE
APPOINTED FOR INIESTIGATION

Nine men of the class of '20
Initiated Thursday by Druids,
orary senior literary society. A
quet at the Union followed the ii
tion.
The following men were taken
"Bill" Hinshaw, "Bill" Bade, "F
Velde, "Butz" Sunley, "Harry"
ner, "Pem" Hart, "Chuck" C
"Dave" Nash, and "Les" Popp. I
were given at the banquet by
M. P. Tilley, Dean John R. Effi
Prof. A. L. Cross, Clark Bishop,
Charles Osius.
COMMENCEMENT TICKETS
Senior literary students desi
ing tickets for their friends an
relatives for Commencement da
exercises should make applic
tion for the tickets at the offic
of the registrar.
* ARTHUR G. HALL,

All books for nextr

t

must be completed and,
the Michigan Union byJ
They are desired at
order that next year's+
revise and work up the
and the desired effects.

y4ar's opera
handed in at
June 14.
this time in
director may
stage setting
It will also

ibers of the
e entitled to
with charms

,different
them will
and fobs,

allow the music writers to begin work
during the summer.
The prospective composers who did
not attend the meeting held last night
at the Union may secure information
by calling William Leitzinger at 343.

MUSICAL CLUBS, NOTICE!
The Varsity Glee and Mandolin1
clubs will meet at 7:30 tonight in Hill
auditorium for a special business meet-
ing before the concert. Tickets must
also be accounted for at the box of-
fice at this time. Every member must
be on time.

of the Michigan Technic appears to- Washington, June 5.-Fifteen mem-
day. The majority of the cuts go to bers of the house, ten Republicans
illustrate the continuation of former and five Democrats were appointed to-
articles by Prof. A. F. Greiner and day by Speaker Gillett to conduct five
Prof. W. L. Badger. investigations of war time expendi-
Special features add to the interest tures of the war department. Rep-
of the last publication. Important resentative Graham, Republican of 11-
among these is an employment bu- linois, was' selected as chairman of
reau department, appearing for the the general committee, and division of
first time. It is expected that this sub-committees, one for each inves-
innovation will prove useful at this tigation, will give the Republicans
time of year, particularly to students two members to one Democrat on
who are seeking summer employment. each committee.

.

...---

[I _

L

11

TONIGHT

HEAR THE

Glee

and

Y'ando lin

Club s

TI CKET
5c
UUU-~A-

6oth Anniversary Concert
SATISFACTI@N OVARANTUED

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