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October 24, 1918 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-24

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I

I6PF1MW

TODAY

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ASSOCIATIED
PRESS
DAY Y ND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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?"J 9d-

'AN U. GU.

ANN ARBOR. MICHIGAN. THURSDAY OCTOBER 24 1 18

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______+____________ ---,-----,v--,------..- ", -.-',..-',.r±(iUJ±L Tkik1ii1ii
PRICE THRE

A t ..t

ITY GHIDIRUN
EDULE WRECKED
FROM STATE BOARD
USES GAME TO BE CAVN-
CELLED
R D CALLS OFF
RTHWESTERN GAME

ase on
Board,

the Decline, Yet State
Prohibits Publie
Meetings

STIUDENTS URGED TO
WEAR THEIR MASKS
'The students should stand behind
President Hutchins in his request that
they wear their influenza masks in
classes and on the campus, if they
would stop the spread of the disease,"
said Dr. Forsythe yesterday. "The
only Way that it can be carried is by
coughing and sneezing and the mask
is the most practical way to prevent
the discharges from harming one's
neighbor. The faculty has supported
the measure well by wearing their
masks and by keeping the class-rooms
supplied with fresh air.'
In regard to the feasibility of clos-
ing school Dr. Forsythe said, "It would
be perfectly absurd to close school.
The students would seize the oppor-
tunity to go to their homes, -thus
spreading the disease if it is already
in their systems or runing into the
danger of contracting it on crowded
trains or in their home towns. On
the other hand, if school were closed
and the students were forced to re-
main in Ann Arbor, .they would spend
their time in each other's rooms in
small crowds or wander the streets,
which is worse than staying in well-
ventilated class-rooms with their
masks on."
The crisis of the epidemic has pass-
ed, Dr. Forsythe believes. Only three
cases among non-S. A. T. C. students.
have developed in the last three days.
le attributes this improvement to
the wearing of gauze masks. .

WILSON DEMANDS
SURRENDER OF HUN
President Submits Plea for Armistice
To Allies and Informs Germany
of His Opinion s
WORLD DESIRES NO TROUBLE
WITH GERMANY IN FUTURE
Virtual Laying Down of Arms Is Price
of Punishment by Combined
Liberty Armies
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 23. - President
Wilson has submitted the German plea
for an armistice and peace to the Al-
lies, and at the same time has inform-
ed Berlin that there can be no armis-
tice except upon terms that would
made it impossible for Germany to
renew hostilities.
While consenting to deal further
with the present authorities in Ger-
many, the President has given them
this warning.
"It (the United States) must deal
with the military masters and mon-
archial autocrats of Germany now, or,
if it is likely to have to deal with them
later, in regard to the internationalr
obligations of the German empire, itf
must demand, notpeace negotiations,
but surrender. Nothing can be gain-
ed by leaving this essential thing un-
said."

(By the Associated Press)
Special to the Michigan Daily.
' Washington, Oct. 23. - President
Wilson has informed the German gov-
ernment that he has transmitted to the
Allies its correspondence with him
seeking an armistice and peace.
The President also sent the sugges-
tion that if the Central Powers are
disposed to effect peace upon terms
and principles already indicated, their
military advisors and the military ad-
visors of the United States should be
asked to submit the necessary terms
of such an armistice as will fully pro-
tect the interests of the peoples in-
volved.

WILSON SENDS HUN
NOTE TO ENTENTE

t

will be no football games for
higan team for at least two
s the result of an order issued
y by the state board of health,
the ban on all public gather-
any kind, to be held in the
thin the next two weeks. This
it was announced was the
that the board would consid-

Spare The Paddle
Spoil The Frosh

ARMERICAN AVALANCHE BURIES ENEMY
MACHINE GUNNERS AT BANTIBEG PHEV ILLE1

INFLUENZA TAKES TWO
MORE FROM SA A T. C.

OXYGEN

GIVEN TO PATIENTS

No Northwestern Game
a result the Wolverine-Nort'i-
rn game, which was, to have been
I ataFerry field on the second
>vember, has been called off,
.ng that the Wolverines will be
ut opposition for over a month.
ether with this announcement
word that the order will affect
aruso concert which was to have
held on the evening of the same
n the same manner. This will
the second time that the concert
een postponed.
,mpts of University officials to
he ban lifted in the case of the
11 game failed when the health
refused to niake any modifica-
f the order.
[I-. ,Bartelme, athletic director
Univefsity, and larlesA. Sink,
ary of the University Schol of
visited the state capitol yester-
- an attempt to have the order
ed. It was then that they were
ely informed that the ban would
rely not be lifted by Nov- 2.
Health Board's Statement
Richard M. Olin, secertary of
ard of health made the follow-
atement to the Michigan men:
answer to your inquiry asking
ban on public gatherings would
ed by Nov. 2, I would say pos-
that the ban will not be lifted
t date. Just when the govern-
econd proclamation will be is-
cannot say."
necessary for the governor of
ate to issue a proclamation de-
the ban' lifted before it can be
considered so.
)ite the statements of Dr. John
ssinger, city health officer of
rbor, and Captain Vaughan, at
ad' of the medical force of the
r. C. at the University, that the
za epidemic in the city was
nder control, the state board
i to act. It is their theory, they
that if they were to permit the
it would again cause the epi-
o surge up because of the large
'ontinued on Page Three)

t
l
r
r

HAVING GREAT RESPIRATORY
DIFFICULTY
Lansing, Oct. 23.-There are now
about 50,000 cases of Spanish influen-
za in the state, health officials an-
nounced tonight. During the 24 hours
ending at noon today, 4,644 new cases
and 134 deaths were reported. Dis-
tribution of Red Cross nurses, to sec-
tions of the state in need of them, was
begun today by Dr. J. A. Evans, of
Detroit, who was supplied by the cen-
tral division headquarters at Chicago
with, a list of all available nurses in
Michigan.

ADPTNE W 0PMETHODFOR'
DISTRIBUTING BLNKS
INDUCTION PAPERS TO BE HAN-
DLED DIRECTLY THROUGH

S. A. T. C. HEADQUARTERS
Lieut. Guy N. Crawford, who has
succeeded Lieut. Richard W. Leche as
personnel offcer, took the remaining
iidtidirbilanks, including the last
allotment received; to the S. A. T. C.
headquarters yesterday and distribut-
ed most of them to the company com-
mander.
Hereafter, the papers will be taken
directly to Lieutenant Crawford or to
the registrar's office. They will then
be delivered through him to the com-
pany commanders. This method is ex-
pected to prove a more rapid and ex-
pedient one than that of having the
men themselves deliver the papers
personally to the company officer.
The following list contains the
names of men whose induction papers
arrived yesterday:
Behnhisel, Donald M.; Bott, Law-
rence G.; Brown, Arthur A.; Comma-
ger, Roger W.; Fast, Ralph B.; Freel,
Frank R.; Kohn, Herbert; Lamp-
shire, Weldon A.; Latten, Harold P.;
Leonerd, Richard H.; Miller, Edwin
C.; Miller, J. Duane; Merrilees, D.
Knight; Nelson, Howard A.; South-
worth, Varnum C.; Stark, Morris;
Strozensky, Charles K.; Swager, War-
ren M.; Thomas, Philip ],.
NAVAL UNIT DOUBLES
LIBERTYBOND QUOTAI

Wilson Demands Surrender
The President's reply to the last
German note was handed to. the
charge of the Swiss legation tonight
for transmission to the German gov-
ernment. It accedes to the request
that he take up with the Allies the
proposals of the- new spoke3smen of
the German people, but does it with
notice that virtual surrender of the
Teutonic armies in the field will be
the price demanded for interruption
of the beating now being administer-
sed.
In transmitting the matter to the
Ailie9,, the President says he has sug-
gested that if they are disposed to ef-
fect peace on his terms and principles
now accepted by the present German
authorities, the American and Allied
military point of view, to submit such
terms as will fully protect the inter-
ests of the people involved, and to in-
sure to the associated governments
the unrestricted power to enforce
peace on the conditions accepted.
s _ Boche to Observe War Rules
The President says he feels he can-
not decline to take up the question of
an armistice, having received solemn
and explicit assurances of the German
government that it accepts the terms
of peace enunciated by him; that the
comes from ministers speaking for an
desire to discuss their application
comes from ministers speaking for an
overwhelming majority of the Ger-
man people, and that the German
armed forces will observe the humane
rules of civilized warfare on land and
sea. He ignores entirely the German
protests and denials in response to his
statement that an armistice could not
be considered while the German army
and navy continue their atrocities.
At the same time that the President's
reply to Germany was made public
the White House gave out correspond-
ence between Secretary Baker and
President Wilson showing that more
than 2,000,000 American soldiers have
embarked to participate in the war
overseas.
NAVAL UNIFORMS
TO APPEAR SOON

More than 300 sophomores met in
University hall at 4:30 o'clock last
evening to discuss ways and means
of curtailing the remarkably charact-
eristic actions of the undisturbed
class of green freshmen, which enroll-
ed in the University this fall. The
performances of the verdant yearlings
through the several weeks since the
opening of the University have made
necessary some sort of drastic meas-
ures, to stop the pulling apart of all
traditions and customs, which have
helped largely to develop Michigan
into the great school, which it now is,
and has been for the past few decades,
the best of all state institutions.
Considering the scarcity of mem-
bers of the class of 1921, the large
turnout showed that the second year
men were alive to their responsibility.
Abe Cohn, Varsity football halfback,
and William Fortune, Varsity guard,
made the first addresses of the after-
noon. They were short but to the
point. That the freshmen had to be
taken in hand was the subject of their
respective talks.
Following the football men, Her-
man August, Varsity debater, and one
of the foremost orators on the Cam-
pus for the past two years, took the
platform amidst an uproar. Upon the
quieting of the sophomores he began
and related example after example of
freshman impuity being practiced on
the .campus every day. He claimed,
and rightly, that not one-fifth of the
first year men are wearing the tra-
ditional pots, which signify their class
and, is paramount for their other,
training. Unless a freshman is1
ashamed of his class he will not re-
fuse to buy a little grey cap, on his,
own accord, without compulsion.-
August added, "They are to be com-
pared with the kaiser, as their favorite
expression, according to their actions,
is 'Me und Gott'." He also claimed1
that if the women of the campus de-
sire to be on a 50-50 basis with the
men in campus activities, their fresh-1
man girls should be attended to.

Two S. A. T. C. men and two Ann
Arbor residents numbered among
those in the death toll of the influenza
epidemic yesterday. This is a small-
er number than has been reported,
however, for 10 days past. Last week
there were from six to 10 deaths per
day.
Only three S. A. T. C. men were
sent to the -hospital yesterday; 22
new cases were reported to J. A. Wes-
singer, city heatlh officer.
The S. A. T. C. men who succumb-
ed were Harold Beiswenger, of Jack-
son, and C. J. Underwood, of Tecum-
seh. Both men had contracted pneu-
monia after the initial symptoms 'of
the influenza manifested themselves.
Underwood received word but two
weeks ago that his brother with the
A. E. F. had been killed in action.
In the infirmary in, Barbour gym-
nasium are 165 men from section B.
All are doing nicely. The hospitals are
still crowded, the Homeopathic hos-
pital alone having 40 of the cases.
Two army trucks were sent to De-
troit recently to bring back a supply
of oxygen tanks. When the disease is
at its crisis and the patient is suffer-
ing greatly through labored breathing,
oxygen is given him, which heightens
his vitality and resistance until the
crisis has passed.
INFLUENZA. EPIDEMIC DUE i
TO ATTACKS OF HYSTERIA
Detroit, Oct. 23.-Dr. John 0. Gas-
ton writes to the editor of the Free
Press and says in part:
"I have been through several severe
'grippe' epidemics and have found
that the great spread of any disease
is due more to fear than to the actual
disease itself. The real cause of the
spread of the Spanish influenza
throughout the camps and country is
due alomst entirely to hysteria, and
to the weakened condition of the peo-
ple caused by the terrible strain of
excessive work and the abnormal
times..
' "Now, let's come down to earth; al-,
low reasonable amount of amusements
and church-going to engage the minds;
of the people."

DEFENSES DISINTEGRATE; Hi
LOSES 2,000 MEN IN BELGIUMU
RETREAT
BOCHES TRY TO HOLD
LINE AT ALL COS'T
"Typewriters" Slow Up Entente Pro
ress; French Gain Near Laon;
Haig Advances
(By the Associated Press)
With the American Army Northwe
of Verdun, Oct. 23 (11 P. M.).-T
Americans tonight are fighting nor
of Bantheville, Hill 297, Hill 299 a
Hill 281, Bantheville having chang
hands several times in the last fe
days. Briulles also has been clear
of the enemy. Hill 281 has been t
scene of severe fighting for four day
the Germans having numerous n,
chine gun nests on its summit. T
capture of the hill gives the Ame:
cans command of Clery-le-Grand a:
the valley along the Landon river.
(By the Associated Press)
With the French Army in Franc
Oct. 23.-Field Marshal von Hinde
berg, in an order to the German of
cers in the field referring to negoti
tions for an armistice, declares, th
he approves of the peace move, an
is obliged to support the governrg
He asks that the confidence repose
in him in the days of success be co
tinued.
(By the Associated Press)
The Allied armies in France an
Belgium are still driving the Germa:
toward their border, but their pro
ress is now comparatively slow. O
the other sectors there is the requ
site stability of the German line
where a crash through probab
would mean the immediate collapse
the' whole defense system-the mo
stubborn resistance is being offere
by the enemy, and what gains a'
being made by the Allies are virtua
ly foot by foot in the face of the ho
nets of the battle line, the machin
gun.
Hun Reluctantly Gives Up

Officers fMiighlt
Hazers' Ceremoncy
Military officers last night put a
stop to the sophomores' first attempt
this year to haze freshmen. A small
group of sophomores appeared on
State street about 8 o'clock last night
with three members of the class of
'22 in their power. As usual a crowd
collected and the freshmen were forc-
ed to amuse the gathering. The first
lot were put through the usual sing-
ing, dancing, and cheering, and then
were sent home running.
A second group of verdants were
picked up on the street, hazed, and
dismissed. Two more first year men
were then caught and made to sit
upon the sign in front of Slater's.
While their tormenters were making
the two victims cheer their class, an
Ann Arbor policeman burst into the
crowd and ordered the men to climb
down from their perch. The sopho-
mores objected, but finally agreed. The
officer then ordered the hazers off the
street. The leaders argued and con-
sulted among themselves for a time
and finally the crowd dispersed, com-
plaining of the downfall of another
Michigan tradition.
GIRLS' ORATORICAL SOCIETY
URGES GIRLS TO TRY OUT

OF REGENTS TO HOLD
IRTANT MEETING FRIDAY
xt meeting of the University
Regents will be held Friday
Oct. 25, at 9:30 o'clock, This
neeting which was to have
d last Friday, the postpone-
ng necessary by the fact that
of the regents could not at-
considerable number of inn-
natters will be taken up, and
te list of all the instructors
is expected to be announced.
L. T. C. ATTENTIONS
army and navy "Y" at
hall has made every pre-
n to assist you in sending
ivilian clothes back home.
your uniform arrives
the old clothes over. You
Id wrapping paper, twine, ,
verything else that you
o mail your clothes in a
)udition. We are glad to
you in this way. The
ig is open until 10 o'clock

A report from the commandant's of-
five of the naval unit here states that
Co. "D' led in the amount subscribed
for Liberty bonds, although Co. "D"
had a higher average subscription per
man. The quota of the entire unit was
$13,000. The amount raised was $26,-
250, which more than doubles the al-
lotment.
Subscriptions from the various com-
panies are as follows: Co. "A," un.-
der company commander E. W.
Krentzberg subscribed $3,750, repre-
senting an average subscription of
$67 per man; Co. "B," under com-
pany commander David P. Wood, sub-
scribed $7,750, or an average subscrip-
tion of $69 per man; Co. "C," under
company commander S. J. Thompson,
subscribed $7,450, which averages $70
per man; Co. "D," under company
commander v K Hansen, subscribed
$7,300, averaging $85 per man.
Sorority Kitchens Prove Great Service
Mrs. Reuben Petersen and Florence
Field, '20, who are in charge of pro-
visions for barracks being sent out by
sorority kitchens, state that they are
having many calls from the men for
fruit, magazines, etcetera.
onT(am'oino .hdl dlnu nnnrr of nn

hL Un 'ReVV~u 1LlyGia1V1T-r
Particular vicious fighting is :
progress west of the Meuse, whet
the Americans are faced by picke
troops, 'with orders to hold them bac
at all costs in the region from I
Cateau to the north of Valencienne
where the British and some Amer
cans gradually are tearing their wa
through the enemy's front, and b
tween Tournai and Audenarde, whex
the British also are hard after ti
enemy.
Notwithstanding the frantic er
deavors of the enemy to maintai
their positions on all three of the,
sectors, material progress has bet
made. Likewise north of Laon tb
French, on an eight mile front, hav
delivered a thrust that carried the'
forward from two to three miles. Int
the hands of the British has falle
2,000 more German prisoners, whi
the Americans, west of the Meuse, a
so have gathered in numbers of tb
enemy and a considerable quantity c
his machine guns.
"Typewriters" Slow Down Advanc
Veritable nests of machine gui
are being encountered by the Amer
cans as they attempt to press forwar
along the front from the Meuse 1
the town of Grandpre, situated nort
of the Argonne forest, but in spite c
these obstacles they have taken fu:
ther ground, and at last account
were steadily keeping up their press
ure against the enemy. Extreme]
heavy counter attacks have been su
cessfully sustained north of Grant
pre,and on this sector particularl
(Continued on page four)
FORMER MEMBER OF DAILY
STAFF DIES AT.PORT ADAM
Word has been received here of tt
death of Laurence A. Storrer, '20, wb
succumbed a few days ago to spina
meningitis at Port Adams, Rhode Is
land, where he had been in militar
service with the field artillery.
Storrer was formerly 'a member a
the business staff of the Michiga
Daily.

The emasuring of men for uniforms
is progressing with greater rapidity,
than has been expected. Measure-
ments of men in the naval unit are
sent to the Great Lakes naval train-
ing station, where suits are selected
accordingly and sent here. The meas-
urements are mailed daily, and the
"blues" will probably start to arrive
within a few days. All expense over
$1,000 will be incurred by men of the
naval unit here.
There is important mail at naval
headquarters for L. M. Tuttle, C. C.
Patterson, W. Romanoff, 0. A. Adell,
0. F. Ringsworth, 0. A. MacNaugh-
ton, and L. N. Merril. These papers
should be called for at once.
Hollanders Cheer Old Neighbors
Two hours after the retreating Ger-
mans had removed the electrified bar-
rier between Belgium and Holland,
the Belgian flag was raised.

Hooverize on Fads in Men's Hats
By an agreement between the do-
mestic felt hat manufacturers and the
conservation division of the War In-
dustries board, all men's hats are to
be made according to the following
specifications:
Colors confined to black, two shades
of brown, two shades of green, two
shades of steel pearl, and Belgian. No
hats with edges turned over or un-
der. Linings 'to be discontinued. No
elastic, buttons, cords, or eyelets. No
stickers in tops of soft hats. Impor-
tation of hats which conflict with
these specifications is forbidden. Felt
hats for women are not included in
these rules.

Athena oratorical society held its
third meeting Tuesday night in Ma-
son hall, at which important busi-
ness for the year was discussed and
outlined. A bulletin in the south en-
trance of University hall has been se-
cured for the future use of the so-
ciety, and is designated by a poster
drawn by Dorothy Comfort, '21.
There are still vacancies in the so-
ciety and all University girls inter-
ested in oratory and debating are in-
vited to participate in meetings and
try-outs.

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