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June 05, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LATHERN
F' SHO0WERS
DAI

I

9£"

Ali zrn

41Iaitii

A

DAY A"NIGHT

SERVICE

5-

X. No. 177.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 5, 1919.

PRICE THIS

3IX.

A.#4"

INGRESS PASSES
IUFFRAGE BILL;
BRAY FOR STATES

SENIOR LITS MEET
LAST TIME TODAY

READY FOR VOTE+
GOVERNING
BODIES

OF STATE

The last and most important meet-
ing of the senior lits will be held at
3 o'clock today in room 101 Econom-
ics building.
All members of this class are urged
by their officers to attend this meet-
ing as this is the only time that com-
plete instructions will be given out for
commencement. The places where the
class will assemble for the various
activities of their last week in the Uni-
versity will be named and the for-
malities that constitute the customs
of class day will be explained.
Alumni secretaries will be elected
at the meeting who will keep the
members of the class posted as much
as possible with the undergraduate
affairs and will arrange for reunions.

t
L
r

MEMORIAL PICTURE"
FUND DISCUSSED
Will Launch Campaign for Money in
Early Portion of Next
Semester

PLANS FINISHED FOR
Classes and Secrietaries Announced
Together with All Reunion
Headquarters
'59 TO BE OLDEST ALUMNI
PRESENT; OTHERS EXPECTED
A large and repreAntative delega-
tion is expected to make the return
of the alumni this month a fitting
"victory reunion." The oldest class
that will be back is 1869, which is to

PRES.

HARRY B. HUTCHINS'
PORTRAIT TO BE PAINTED

PY LEADERS UNITE
REAT CELEBRATION,
Was First Drafted by Susan
B. Anthony in
1875
(By Associated Press)
ington, June 4.-Action by con-
a equal suffrage-subject of a
r 40 years-ende late today in
u by the senate, by a vote of
>, of the historic Susan B. An-
onstitutional amendment reso-

In order that the future men and

ONE THIRD Of YANKS
IN ARCHANGEL EMBARK
SIX COMPANIES IN RUSSIA LEAVE
FOR BREST BY
WATER

posed amendment adopted by
by a vote of 304 to 89, May
e first act of the new Con-
w goes to the states, ratifi-
the legislatures of three-
which is required for its in-
m in the federal constitu-

(By Associated Press)

the roll call today showed two
ea more than the necessary two-
rds for the resolution, which was
ited by Susan B. Anthony in 18s
1 first introduced by Senator Sar-
at of California in 1878.
Loud applause, unchecked by the
siding officer, swept the senate
imber when the final vote .vas an-
anced following two days debate.
ny jubilation meetings were in
gress tonight at headquarters of va-
uis women's organizations which
re been active in support, of the
asure.
ECTIONS HELD
BY COMEDY CLUB
omedy club elected the following
ers for the year 1919-20 at its
sting Tuesday afternoon: Elwyn
vies, '21j president; Elizabeth
es, '20, vice-president; Carrie
rchild, '21, secretary; and Joseph
ry, '21, treasurer.
Inancial reports were given and
:t year's plays w*ere discussed, a3-
ugh there were no definite decisions'
ched.
ry-outs for Comedy club will be
I from 9to 12 o'clock Saturday
ning in the auditorium of Univer-
hall. It is suggested that try-outs.
e prepared to recite somerselec-
t already learned, although this is
entirely necessary since the com-
ee will be ready to supply mate-

Archangel, June 4.-A contingent of
Aierican infantry which has been
serving in Northern Russia boarded a
transport today for the journey to the
United States. These are the Ameri-
can troops detailed to sail for home.
The detachment will go to Brest.
Six companies of the 339th regiment,
aggregating 1,900 men, or approxi
mately one-third of the American
force on the Archangel, comprise the
first detachment to leave. They em-
barked at Economia, the winter port
of Archangel.
Other infantry companies will sail
as soon as transports are available,
but it is probable that the 13th engi-
neers will remain here several weeks
longer.
Brigadier General W. P. 1ichardson,
American commander, expects to
maintain his headquarters at Archan-
gel a considerable time after the de-
parture of the troop's.
Before the boarding of the trans-
port the Americans were viewed by
general Ironsides, Britishvconmand-
er, General Miller, Russian governor
general, and General Richardson.
General Miller thanked them for the
"assistance rendered us, and for the
hardships suffered during the hard
winter months," and wished them a
happy and safe return home.

women of Michigan may associate
the results of President Harry- B.
Hutchins' untiring work in the inter-
ests of the institution with a likeness
of him, the board of directors of. the
Michigan Union have passed a mo-
tion that a fund of money shall be
raised on the campus to have a pic-
ture of the retiring president paint-
ed by a celebrated American artist.
It was the intention of the board to
start a campaign this semester to se-
cure the required amount but numer-
ous senior activities and the Mando-
lin and Glee club concert this Friday
interfered with the arranged program
so that nothing will be done until next
fall. W. B. Weathers, '21E, will have
charge of securing the money 'from
the students. It is planneda that an
entertainment shall be given -and a
Dollar campaign be instituted about
the third week after the semester
starts.
President Angell Painted by'Chase
A portrait of the late President
James B. Angell was painted in 1907
by William M. Chase, one of the most
famous of American painters. The
painting is now hung in Aluinni Me-.
morial hall.
Union Proposes Plan
The Union instituted the plan for
the proposed portrait since President
Hutchins was so instrumental in se-
curing the large building that is now
nearing completion. "President Harry
B. Hutchins,"- said Homer L. Heath,
secretary of the Union, yesterday, "has
done more for the Union than prac-
tically any other man. It is to him
that the campus owes a debt of grat-
itude for the present Union building.
When he realized what the building
would mean to tW undergraduate men
and the alumni he spared no effort in
doing his utmost to see that the build-
ing was erected."
Artist Not Yet Selected
Although no artist has been select-
ed as yet to paint the picture it is es-
timated that about $4,000 will have to
be raised to insure the best portrait
that can possibly be obtained. When
finished it will be hung either in Alum-
ni Memorial hall or in one of the
spacious reading rooms of the Union
building.

LATE WIRE BRIEFS
Vienna, June 4.-The Aus);rian gov-
ernment has decided unanimously that
the peace terms presented at St. Ger-
main on Monday are unacceptable, the
Noues Abendblatt says:
Basle, June 4.-Members of the Ger-
man peace delegation who have re-
turned to Berlin from Versailles will
remain 'in the German capital at the
disposal of their government until the
allied and associated powers declare
themselves disposed to negotiate on
the peace terms, the Nachdichten of
Frankfort says. The German cabinet,
it adds, has not ,yet made any deci-
sion as to its attitude in case the allies
refuse to negotiate and demand that
the Germans sign the terms as pre-
sented.
Nogales, June 4.-Authentic infor-
mation was given out here today by
federal officials that the Mexicafl
government will not be granted per-
mission to transport federal Mexican
troops in bond through the United
States to take the feld against the
Villa forees in Chihauhua City.
MUSICAL VARIETIES,
TO NLIVEN 1CONCERT

FACULTY MEMBI
I NAUGSURATEII
DRAH4MATIC SO(G
MEMBERU IP EXTENDED
INTERESTED AND WILI
TO LEND SUPPORT
PLAN FOR ERECTI(
OF CAMPUS THE
Committees Alre'ady Appoi
Consider Type of Play-Ho
Suitable
With the erection of a cam
ater as one of its objects, a
ganization to be officially k1
the Dramatic society of the U;
of Michigan has just been fo
some of the members of the
The present memberships are
those interested in the role
drama in modern life and in
nection with education.
The movement along thi
which had been gathering- f
some time, culminated Tues
cording to the information g
yesterday, when those interes
and adopted a permanent c
tion.

celebrate its 60th graduation anniver-
- sary. The next oldest is '66M, and
the '69, whose members will return
after half a century out 'of college.
The rest of the classes range all the
way down the years to '17.
Class Dinners Plannedj
Reunions will commence June 221
and will last through commencement,
- which is to be June 26. Various class
dinners are being planned and a
number of alumni meetings will be
held.
The classes that are holding
reunions, their class secretaries, and
the class reunion headquarters are as
follows: '59, William J. Beal, Alumni
office, Alumni Memorial hall; '65MI, A.
H. Gibson, east amphitheater,. Medical
building; '69, Franklin S. Dewey,
Prof. Kelsey's office, Alumni Memorial
hall; '72, Louis H. Jennings, east
reading room, Alumni Memorial hall;
'73, Frank E. Bliss, west end reading
room, Alumni Memorial hall; '79, L.
L. Van Slyke, lecture room, Alumni
Memorial hall; '83, Fred W. Arbury,
University club, Alumni Memorial
hall; '84, Mrs. Fred N. Scott, Univer-
sity club, Alumni Memorial hall; '89,.
E. B. Perry, northeast room, Alumni
Memorial hall.
Medics and Laws Here
'Ninety-four, J. Raleigh Nelson, Phi
Delta Phi house; '94M, J. F. Breakey,
faculty room, Medical building; '94,
Henry W. Webber, Acacia house;
'94D, R. E. Bailey, Dental building;
'02, Arthur M. Barrett, campus society
room B, third floor new Union build-
ing; '02L, Prof. Joseph Drake, Prof.
Drake's office, Law building; '03,
Walter McNeil, campus society room C,
third floor new Union building; '04,
Bethune D. Blaine, campus society
room D, third floor new Union build-
ing; '04M, George A. Seybold, west
amphitheater, Medical building; '04L,
Roscoe B. Huston, room C, Law build-
ing; '05; Louis Quarles, student offices,
third floor new Union building; '05E,
Fred R. Temple, engineering society
room, Engineering building; '05L,
Victor E.dVan Ameringenm, room D,
Law rbuilding.
Engineers on Hand
'Seven E, Harry L. Coe, Engineering
library; '09, Florence Baker White,+
billiard room, second floor new Unionl
building; '10, Lee A. White and Fanny3
B. Biggs, Dr. Angell's house, cam-j
pus; '16L, Lieut. Renville Wheat, room1
B, Law building; '17, Yancey R. Alt-
sheler and acting secretary for wom-:
en Jeanette Armstrong, reading room,
first floor new Union building.

"JAZZ" MUSIC OF EVERY KIND ON
FRIDAY'S PROGRAM IN
HILL AUDITORIUM
"Jazz," harmhony, and the choicest
of Michigan songs have been select-
ed by the Varsity Glee and Mandolin
club in arranging an especially at-
tractive program of 15 numbers for its
60th anniversary concert to be given
Friday evening in Hill auditorium.
The varied nature of the selections
to be rendered by the combined clubs
and the assisting campus favorites,
assure the success of the organization
in making this entertainment even
morepopular than its performances
of past years, and the banner attrac-
iton of 1919
Solo by Chase B. Sikes, '17
Chase B. Sikes, '17, a former lead-
er of the Glee club has been secured
to render a solo which is certain to
claim applause, especially from those
who remember the singer in his ap-
pearances in former musical activit-
ies during his active membership in
the club.
The Midnight Sons' quartet, whose
popularity is well established, will be
present with a personnel of Darling,
Boes, Wilson, and Jones. Upholding
(Continued on Page Six)
MODERN LANGUAGE
F I E L D BROADENS
Sixty hours as a maximum amount
of work elective in the Romance'
languages instead of the present 40
hours' limitation will be permitted as
a result of the recent action taken by
the literary faculty. The matter will
now go before the Board of Regents
at the next meeting for their approv-
al.

London, June 4.-Bolshevik propa-
ganda being transmitted from the
wireless station at Tsarskoe-Selo, in-
dicating that the report that Petro-
grad had been occupied or surrounded
was misleading. An unconfirmed press
report received in Copenhagen said
that Esthonian and Finnish troops had
occupied Petrograd. Tsarskoe-Selo is
15 miles south of Petrograd and the
seat of the former royal palace.
"HOT NUMBER" OF
GARGOYLE APPEARS

To Work With Other club
The purpose of the society is
ordinate itself with the various
activities which already exist
campus, while its prime purpo
first object is to build a campu
ater which will be at the disp
all the other dramatic clubs.
With this idea in view the n
ganization has appointed a con
which is now at work on ph
bring about the building of suych
ater. This committee will co
the size of the play-house, the
and accommodations such as thi
ery and storage rooms, and th
upon which it would be best to
No Definite Polley Yet
Though at present the soct
made up of about 40 members
faculty of the University and
others closely connected with I
stitution, it is not to be exclusii
faculty organization, but memt
will be extended to all others w
interested and willing, to wor
give their support. As yet all
are tentative and no definite
has been laid down. But in it
pose the present members belie
society will bring the other c
dramatic activities under a g
unity. The members also unanir
agree that it should not in any w
terfere with these activities, but
er secure by co-operation the
sary support and equipment nee
The entire management of tb
ciety is lodged in the hands
board of directors composed of th
lowing persons: Mr. Robert A. C
bell, treasurer of the University
Wilfred B. Shaw, secretary of tb
umni association; Mr. Homer >
general manager of the Michiga
ion; Dean John R. Effinger, Mrs.
B. Jordan, and Profs. Herbert A
yon, John R. Brumm, Thomas E.
kin, Louis A. Strauss, Richard D
lister, J. Raleigh Nelson, and Sa
Moore. The greater part of the
of the board will be carried o
(Continued on Page Six)
COLLEGE TRANSFERS, NOT.
All students planning
transfer from the literary c
lege to any other school or c
lege of the University, providi
the student is not taking a co
bined curriculum, should at o
file with the registrar applic
tion for such privelege.
ARTHUR G. HALL

BOLSHEVIK COUNTER ATTACK
ON ESTHONIANS SUCCESSFUL
London, June 4.-A Russian wire-
less message received here today
claims that the Bolshevik have suc-
cessfully undertaken a counter offen-
sive against the Esthonians advanc-
ing along the Gatchina railway.
The Soviet troops occupied several
villages 45 miles west of Gatchina,
which is 85 miles south of Petrograd,
and also are advancing in the Narva
sector.

K

LAST DAY FOR EXCUSES
The committe on attendance
in the literary college will meet
today for the last times this
semester. This will be the last
opportunity that will be given
the men and women in the lit-
erary college to submit excuses
for absecnces.
ARTHUR G. HALL,
Registrar.

.For students suffering under the
hot wave quavers and the bluebook
blues, relief is in sight. The, Hot
Numberrof'the Gargoyle is out.
The cover is an ideal hot weather
feature. Just a glance at the gentle-
man diving into the cool watery depths
makes one feel at least 10 degrees,
cooler. It is one of the best of the
recent series of good covers. Other
drawings show how professor's grade
bluebooks, how girls play the great
national game, and the meaning of the
phrase "bachelors' quarters!" Every
queer feature of Ann Arbor life from
the barber to the frosh is dealt with
in merry mood.
The writers are not at all behind
the artists. The magazine is as full
of ginger as the DAILY'S write-up of
the recent Daily-Gargoyle baseball
game, and the jokes are as funny as
an editor's pitching. Enough said.

NEW RHENISH GOVERNMENT.
GREETED COLDLY BY PEOPLE
Berlin, June 4.-Dispatches from
Frankfort received here regarding the
setting up of the self styled Rhenish
provisional government at Wiesbaden,
state that the government took up its
'headquarters in the provincial ad-
ministration building. Three men com-
prised the administrators, Dr. Dorten,
the head of the movement; Klaus
Kraemer, a school teacher, and Cap-
tain Krekel, a provnicial officer. They
were received coldly, the messages
state, but were not armed because
they were accompanied by French of-
ficers.
The workmen of Ludwigshafen were
reported to have held meetings at-
tended by thousands, and other ad-
vices declare that the citizens of Co-
blenz have entered stormy protests
against the movement.
The French authorities, the advices
add, issued an order that Dr. Dorten
must be obeyed in his new capacity,
and a strike movement against the
change was quickly broken up when
French orders were issued.
At Medence the French authorities1
are declared to have published an of-I
ficial announcement of the proclama-
tion.

COMMERCE CLUB
INITIATES SEVEN
Seven men were taken into the
Commerce club at their annual spring'
initiation last night. They are: H.
Andreason, '20; C. S. Baxter, '21; J.
Donovan, Jr., '21; H. Johnstone, '21;
H. Martin, '21; W. Smith, '20, and R.
Varty, '20.
After the initiation the members and
initiates" enjoyed a banquet at the
Arcade Cafeteria. P. A. Lawrence,
the new president, acted as toast-
master. J. P. Adams, '19, the retiring
president, welcomed the initiates into.
the club. The response on behalf of
the new men was given by C. S. Bax-
ter, '21. The speaker from the faculty
was Prof. L Leo Sharfman of the econ-
omics department.

d,
s
t:
I;
4

The general rule with regard to the
maximum amount of work in any one
department will thus, in the case of
students taking courses in the Ro-
mance languages, be modified so that
they may take not more than 60 hours
in this department, and not more than
40 hours in any one language. This
will enable a student who comes to
the University with a fair start in
both the French and Spanish lang-
pages to elect enough work so that
he will be qualified to teach both of
these languages after his graduation.
Superintendents and principals of
schools throughout the country are
now making a demand upon the lang-
uage departments of the colleges
and uniyersities for students who are
qualified to teach both the French and
Spanish languages. In order to meet
this demand the literary faculty deem-
ed it necessary to raise the maximum
number of hours.

i ,
! .

. I .

Ilumber of hours. I,

'U

TOMORROW,

ALL SET
FOR THE

.Glee

and

?lando tin

TICKE'

Club's

C

6oth Anniversary Concert?
"BETTER THAN IT'S BEEN IN EIGHT YEARS "-HARISON
Chase Sikes, '17, is ilack-Other Old Stars in New Numbers

I

I

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