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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 03, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-06-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-iJE WEATHER
PROMABLY SHOWERS
TO0DAY

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ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY AND IGHT V
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, -TUESDAY, JUNE 1. 1919.

2310 TINIM Mini rb vnvn

- PRICE THREE

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VU DAY FLIGHT
Of ARMY AIRMEN

LL BE MADE BY AIR
ICE IN FEW'
DAYS

rJazzbo "Heralds
Friday's Concert
"Jazhbo' of the Midnight Sons'
Quartet has made his appearance in
the window of a4 State street book-
store to advertise the 60th anniver-
sary concert of the Varsity Glee and
Mandolin club which will be held at
8 o'clock Friday evening in Hill
auditorium.
"Jazzbo" is reputed to be one of
the Midnight Sons of the old days; his
attitude certainly verifies this state-
ment. But he looks as though he
might put on some pretty good "jazz"
for the campus if he has a large aud-
ience.

PEACE TIME POLICY FOR CARRIERS OF
INTERSTATE TRADE BEFORE CONGRESS

vC-4 WILL NOT RETURN
TO STATES VIA AIR
io "Stunt Flying" Encouraged by
Officials of
Navy
(By Associated Press)
Washington, June 2.-An attempt to
nake a transcontinental flight from
few York to San Francisco in less
han two days with only one stop en
oute'will be made by the Army Air
ervice within the next few days. A
Partin Bombing plane will be used.
'he start will be made from Mineola,
ong Island, and North Platte, Ne-
raska, fifteen hundred miles from
'ew York has been selected as the
tidway point.
16 Hours for First Lap
The schedule allows only 16 hours
rid 39 minutes for the first lap, and
he departure from North Platte is set
r 3:30 o'clock on the following
tprning. The plane should land at
in Francisco at 5:58 o'clock in the#
rening. Officials here believe the trip'
Eould be made easily within the 37
ours and 28 minutes allowed in the

(By Associated Press)
Washington, June 2.-A permanent
peace time policy for common car-
riers engaged in interstate commerce,
including railroads, telegraph, tele-
phone, cable, and radio companies, was
presented to Congress today in a bill
drafted by the interstate commerce
commission and introduced by Sena-
tor Pomeraine, Democrat of Ohio and
Representative Esch, chairman of the
house interstate commerce committee.
Regulation of the carriers by the
commission under broad and extend-
ed powers, is provided in the bill which,
is a proposed revision of the inter-
state commerce act, and is said to rep-
resent generally, the commission's
views on existing transportation pro-
blems.
The bill would give the commission
sweeping authority, over rates, serv-
ice, consolidations, extensions, security
issues, and virtually all physical op-
erations, including trace priorities,

1919 Wolverine
To Be enlarged

pooling, *and joint use of physical
property. Under 'the measure the Increased size and a larger circula-
commission would have power to con- tion will distinguish the 1919 Wol-
tinue the present regional plan of verine from those of previous
railroad operation and also extend itvenefo thsofpviu years.
to all pipe lines, express, and all inter- The paper of the coming Summer
state wire companies. school will have a sheet form as large
as that of The Daily and each issue

Washington, June 2.-Increased tele-
phone and telegraph rates put into ef-
fect Jan. 21 under the order of Post-
master General Burleson were upheld
today by4he supreme court. The court
held that under the joint resolution
by which the wire systems were taken
over by the government, there was au-
thority for it following with interstate
rates.
The court set aside the South Dakota
supreme court's decrees enjoining the
Dakota Central and three other tele-
phone companies for increasing inter-
state toll rates and dissolved the fed-
eral court decrees permanently re-
straining from charging increased tele-
graph rates in Illinois.

Said to be Best Ever
To help him out there will be three
other Midnight Sons, a Fussers' Doz-
en, the Jazz Sextet, the Varsity Quar-
tet, and the Varsity Stringed Octet,
as well as the other men of the Glee
and Mandolin club to the number 01
80. Mr. Theodore Harrison, director
of the Glee club, and Mr. Frank Ta-
ber, director of the Mandolin club,
say that they have the best clubs they
have directed. Regardless of the
shortage of tenors early in the se-
mester, the Glee club is well balanced,
says Mr. Harrison.
Dance to Follow-.Coneert
Tickets are on sale on the campus
and at stores downtown and near the
campus. The admission is to be 35
cents, including war tax. A dance
will be held at the Union after the
concert until 2 o'clock to celebrate the
club's birthday. One dollar admis-
sion is to be charged for the dance.
Diamond's orchestra is to play.

E
;,
8
f
r
,
i.

AUSTRIAgN PEACE
TREATY SIMIU
TO GERMAN TER
MILITARY AND FINANCIAL, CI
ES TO APPEAR
LATER
NEW STATES CREATE
FROM FORMER NAT
Empire Loses Forty Millions of I
by Agreement of -
Pee

will probably contain six pages.
First Issue June 26
The first -edition of the paper will
appear on Commencement day, June
26, and regular issues will appear on
each Tuesday, Thursday, and Satur-
day thereafter until the close of the
session, August 22. In all, there will
be 25 issues. a
To all local subscribers will be
given a directory of the Summer
school students. The directory, whicl
regularly sells for 35 cents, will be
included in the subscription price of
$1.00. Foreign subscriptions also
will be $1.00.
More Tryouts Wanted
A number of men who will attend
the Summer session have already
signed up as prospective staff mem-
bers of The Wolverine. Mark K.
Ehlbert, '20 managing editor, and J.
Ellsworth Robinson, '19, business
manager, are anxious to communi-
cate with any men intending to try
out for either the editorial or business
staffs. Any such men may make ap-
pointments by communicating with
Ehlbert at 2414 or Robinson at 1505.

1
e

-_-.'___-___t

LETZINER ED
NEXT YERS' OPERA

ADDITIONAL ALLOWANCE
BLANKS SOON AVAILABLE

POPULAR CLASS IN
STILL OPEN TO
STUDENTS

DANUING
ALL

ALL

APPLYING MUST BRING
ORIGINAL OR DUPLICATE
DISCHARGE

Ray N. Francis, a flyer of
rience, both in military and
al planes, will be in charge
ht. He will be accompanied
imund A. Clune, and two or
chanics. The plane to be
spable of carrying one ton of
r from ten to twelve pas-

No Return Flight
Washington, June 2.-The American
aplane NC-4 which arrived at Ply-
outh, England, Saturday, thereby
impleting the first transatlantic
ght will not attemptra non-stop or
.y kind of a flight back to the United
ates, Secretary Daniels said today.
ie seaplanes will be disassembled
d 'shipped to this country.
The Secretary said the navy con-
mplated no attempt at a non-stop
ms-ocean flight in the near future
the navy did not desire to make a
ectacular showing, was not in any
mpetition for trans-Atlantic flight
nors, and did not favor "stunt" fly-

STYLUS ANNOUNCES
CONTEST WINNERS
Prize-winning stories in the contest
held by Stylus this year were "A
Daughter of the Sun," by Helen E.
Campbell, '20, and "Three Hours
Late," by Margaret Spain, '20, these
two contributions tieing for first
place. The $10 to be given in prizes
was therefore, divided equally between
the two.
LATE WIRE BRIEFS

William A. Leitzinger, '20, was nam-
ed general chairman of the coming
opera at a meeting Monday of the
committee on committees of the
Union for election of the chairman
for the 1920 Mimes' production.
Others Chosen
Frederick R. Storrer, '21E, will be
chairman of properties, William W.
Peattie, '21A, chairman of costumes,
William P. Favorite Jr., '20E, chair-
man of stage committee, Russell C.
Barnes, '20, publicity chairman, Mur-
ray F. Gardner, '20, advertising chair-
man, A. F. King, '20 electrician.
Various men have been at work for
some time writing tentative plots and
books for the show which is expected
to surpass all former productions of
the Mimes.
Hoyer Gives Lessons
One of the criticisms of this year's
opera has been the rather amateurish
dancing of the cast. For the expressI
purpose of assuring a better supply
of dancing material for the 1920 show,
E. Mortimer Shuter, director of "Come
On, Dad," has brought Mr. Roy Hoyer
who played in "Chin Chin" to Ann
Arbor this week to give dancing les-
sons to all those who apply. An en-
thusiastic group of 22 beginners re-
ported for practice at 7 o'clock last
night in the New Union building, Mr.
Hoyer and Mr. Shuter expressed
themselves well satisfied with the pro-
gress made. Experience gained in
this course will give prospective try-
outs for next year's opera a distinct
advantage over those who know noth-
ing of stage dancing, it is declared by
the committees.
Any additional students may enroll
in the class by reporting at 7 o'clock
tonight in the Michigan Union.

The Red Cross station in the Nick-
els Arcade is soon expected to be the
scene of another such rush as follow-
ed the announcement of the issue of
bonuses to discharged soldiers. On
Thursday or Friday of this week
blanks for use in applying for addi-
tional travel allowances will be avail-
able.
All those who intend to make appli-
cation must bring either the original
discharge or the duplicate used in
sending for the bonus. Much delay
and confusion will be avoided if ap-
plicants will avail themselves of this
opportunity to make their applica-
tions in the correct form.
Blanks Expected Soon
It was also announced that although
there has been some delay in sending
a few of the bonuses it is expected
that they will all be received soon.
Members of the Reserve Corps who
have had their applications for the
$60 bonus returned without the check
are advised to send in another appli-
cation in which no reference should
be made to the first application. For
some reason a number of applications
sent in by the men of the Reserve
Corps were returned but received
prompt attention when sent in the
second time.
Urged to Keep Insurance
With regard to the Insurance Con-
version campaign no definite an-
nouncements were made. This cam-
paign is being planned by the Red
Cross and is to be waged shortly after
the peace 'terms are signed. Those
who have government insurance are
urged not to drop it because they will
have an opportunity to convert it into
other insurance later on.

GLEE CLUB GIVES
SERENADE ROUTES
The annual serenade of the Varsity
Glee and Mandolin club will be held
tonight and tomorrow- night. The
club will meet at 8:30 tonight at the
School of Music, and its route will be
as follows: Helen Newberry residence,
Kent Hall, Martha Cook building,
Delta Delta Delta, and Pi Beta Phi.
Wednesday night the clubs will visit
Delta Gamma, Kappa Kappa Gamma,
Alpha Chi Omega, Chi Omega, Kappa
Alpha Theta, Collegiate Sorosis, Theta
Phi Alpha, and Gamma Phi Beta.
FAREWELL GIVEN
FETTER TONIGHT
Mr. N. C. Fetter, for two years sec-
retary of the University Y. M. C. A.,
will be the guest of honor at an out-
door reception to be given this after-
noon at the home of Dean Mortimer
R. Cooley, 1405 E. Hill St.
Mr. Fetter will leave for Boston on
July 1, after seven years of religious
work in Ann Arbor. Before taking
the position of Y. M. C. A. secretary,1
he was for five years guild director of
the local Baptist guilds. He is to be-I
come Baptist student pastor of Bos-1
ton, and will have charge of all thel
high school Baptist guilds in greaterj
Boston, and Also the Harvard guild,
Mr. Fetter graduated from Bucknell
university in 1909, and from Rochester
seminary in 6912.

(By Associated Press)
f St. Germain; June 2.-The conditi
of peace of, the Allied and associa
powers, with the exception of 'milit
reparation, financial, and cert
boundary clauseg, were handed.to
Austrian plentipotenaries at St. (
main today.
Tnose clauses which are not
ready for presentation will be de
ered as soon as possible, the Austri
in the mean time having the opp
tunity to begin work on the grea
part of the treaty in an effort to fac
tate a final decision.
Treaty Like German
The Austrian treaty follows exac
the same outlines af the German,
in many places is identical with
except for the change in name. (
tain specific clauses which app:
only to Germany are of course om
ted, and certain new clauses incluc
especially as regards the new sta
created out of the former Ausi
Hungarian empire, and the protect
of the rights of the Hungarian e
pire and the protection and the rig
of the racial, religious and linguis
minorities in Austria, Czecho-Slavak
Rumania, and the Serbian-Croati
Slovenian states.
Austria is left by the treaty a at
of from 6,000,000 to 7,000,000 peop
inhabiting a territory of between.
000 and 6,000 square miles. She is
quired to recognize the completes
dependence of Hungary, Czecho-Sl
akia and the Serbian Croatian-Stove
ian state, and to cede other territor
which, previously, in their union w
her, composed the empire of Austri
Hungary with its population of ov
50,000,000 people.
Accepts League of Nations
Austria agrees to accept the Leag
of Nations covenant and the lab
charter, to renounce all her ext
European rights, to demobilize 1
whole naval and aerial forces, to adi
the right of trial by the Allied a
associated powers of her nationi
guilty of violating the law and cu
toms of force, and to accept detail
provision similar to those of the Ge
man treaty as to economic relatic
and freedom of transit.
SOPHOMORE LITS URGED TO
PAY UP DUES IIBEDIATE]

POSITION OF PRES. CARRANZA IN
MEXICO CRITICAL SAY REPORTS
El Paso, June 2. - That Counsel-
General Garcia, representing the Mex-
lean government at El Paso, left hur-
ridly for Mexico City, in obediance to
orders wired from, President Carranza
immediately following reports today
that Chichuahua City had fallen, is
taken by Carranza and Villa officials
here, as proof that the situation at
Torrean, Jiminez, and Chihauhua
City is critical.
Juarez, June 2.-Many residents of
Juarez are sending their belongings
and their families across the inter-
national bridge into American terri-
tory today, althopgh there is no re-
port that Villa forces are nearing this
city.
SENIOR LIT. BILLS DUE
Senior lits. who have received
bills from Treasurer George B.
Berg for class dies are advised
Ithat this will be the last chance
Ito, pay 1p, as the booQ 5 are to be
QWed i0Ql,

(By Associated Press)
Paris, June 2.-Norway has refused
to join in a blockade of Germany in
case the German delegates refuse to
sign the peace treaty.
Washington, June 2. - Railroad
freight and passenger increases made
by the railroad administration last
June were today upheld by the su-
preme court. The court held that
the authority conferred by the reso-
lution and the act were war powers
conferred on the President and that
the power of the federal government
was "supreme and conclusive." The
opinion was upanimous.
Paris, June 2.-The reply of the
Allied and associated governments to1
the German counterproposals, the
Echo de Paris declares, will be hand-
ed to Count von Brockdorff-Rantzau on
on Friday. It will constitute a re-1
fusal of the German proposals. The<
Germans, the newspaper adds, will bez
told today they must accept or refuse7
the Allied conditions before June 25.1

INTERFRATERNITY STEWARDS
WILL ELECT NEW OFflCERS

I

Foreign Office Denies Secret Pact
Tokio, June 1.-The Foreign Office
has denied as "unequivocally false"
a statement published in Chinese
newspapers that Japanese agents in
1916 and 1918 concluded secret agree-
ments with Germany.

Influenza Serious in Belgian Congo
Brussels, June 2.-Persons arriv-
ing here from the Congo say that
Spanish influenza has played havoc
among the population of the Belgian'
Congo territories. Many villages have
lost nearly one-half of their inhabi-I
tants.

Interfraternity stewards will hold
an important meeting in the Union
tonight at 7 o'clock. The purpose of
this meeting is to elect permanent
officers for the newly founded organi-
zation and therefore a representative
number of stewards is desired.

Ui

Sophomore literary students are
urged to pay their dues as soon as pos-
sible. Dues may be paid today in
U-hall from 1 to, 4 o'clock or to any of
the following committee: Albert C.
Jacobs, Lawrence Butler, Allan H.
Rorick, Lee M. Woodruff, Cornelia K.
Clark, Helim H. Hulbert, Katrina
Schermerhorn, Josephine McGuiniss,
and Alice E. Beckham.
COMMENCEMENT TICKETS
Senior literary students desir-
ing tickets for their friends and
relatives for Commencement day
exercises should make applica-
tion for the tickets at the office
of the registrar.
ARTHUR G. HALL,
Registrar.

CHANGE

OF

DATE

Ohio State vs. Michigan Baseball Game at Ferry Field
From Wednesday June 3rd to Tuesday June 2nd

11 II

II

I

FRIDAY,
JUNE 6
35c

Tickets Now

6oth Anniversary Concert of the

Tickets Now

Hill

Glee

and

?landolin

Club

ONLY APPEARANCE THIS YEAR

Auditorium
8 o'Clock
350
,nluding Tax

flidnight Sons

Varsity Quartet

Jazz

Sextet

Fussers' Dozen

uI

w

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