100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 01, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-06-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

<Y G

Efr41

:4E aitl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY~ AND MIGHT WIRE!
SERVICE

TODAY

XXIX. No. 174.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 1919.

PRICE THREE C

ICHIG AN GAINS BIG

TEN TENNIS

AND

BASEBALL

CHAMPIONSHIPS;

0

RANKS THIRD

IN EASTERN

MEEr

CgRL JOHNSON STAR OF COLLEGE
CLASSIC, SCORING 121-2 POINTS;
COOK, BAKER, AND SMITH PLACE

Wes brook Wins "igTen Tennis
Matches; Bartz In Doubles

WOLVERINES WHIP ILLINOIS 7-O1
KNODE SLAMS IN HOMER IN SECOND;
PARKS WINS SIX BITNCONTEST!

COM GLL GAINS FIRST WITH
49 1-2 COUNTERS; FIFT
CONSECUTIVE TIME
SEATTLE MAN JUMPS
23 FEET, 10 1.2 INCES
MayiutM, Penslvaus0, Finisbes
First i 100-Iard Dash Against
Welverine St r
Cambridge May 31 - Cornell ath-
letes won the track and field cham-
ioUnbIps of the Intercollegiate Ath-
letic Association foday for the fifth
con9eutive time with 39 1-2 points.
The .Univeristy of Pennsylvania was
" OQQod with 29; Michigan third
with 35 1-2, and Harvard fourth with
23, Other colleges scored as follows:
Dartmouth, 14; Yale, 13 1-; Prince-
ton, 12; Bowdon, 5; Maine, 5; . I.
,T,, 5; Georgetown, 4; Lafayette, 4;
Syracuse, 3, and Coumbia, 3.
Ireaks Two, Xile Record
One record was broken when I. C.
Presser of Cornell comapletely out-
classed alarge field in the two mile
run and finished nearly one-half lap
ahead of the second man in 9:22 2-5.
The former record was 9:23 4-5 made
by J. F. Hoffmire of Cornell, over
the same track in 1914.
The inability of C. Erdman of Prince-
ton to compete worked wonders for
Cornell. The Princeton star had beep.
picked to win both hurdle rages. With
Ercma out Cornell rmped hors
' ,,0 first and second in tle high and
9W, hgrdles and won $ points. Cor-
4eli's other points were scored s
tollow': Five each in the .440 the .$8,
the mile and the two mile, and one
a4d one-alf in the high jU p.
Jifhsou Strpnu in Poits
J, A, Mayer of Cornell was run-
iln1 in wonderl form and lead the
401ds to the tape i the quarter and
i1f mile after gueliigg races in
ic0 l1e wap pressed all the way, In
the quarter he had a hard time beat-
JUg Terril of Princeton and'Rice of
Rutgers in :49 2-5 and in the half
;nile Gutafson, Pennsylvania, kept at
his shoulder until the last few yards.
The time was 1:56 2-5.
Carl Johnson was the high individ-
ual point winner. He added 12 1-2
points to Michigan's score, running
second to W. Haymond in the 100, win-
ning the broad jump with a leap of
23 feet 10 1-2 inches and tied for sec-
and in the high jump with the bar at
' feet 1 inch. Cook;8aker- and Siith
a score points ±or )4ichigan.
W0 ar 4ash-Vopi by UayxOnd
'"nay> ani, Johuisn, 14ichga,
eo Moor, Harvard, thir; Cok,
(Continued on Page Si)
PI LO A FEES DUE
Diploma, business administra-
tration'Cerficate, and teacher's
diploma fees are now due and
will have to be paid before 4
o'clock Tuesday afternoon, June
3. Blanks to be filled out when
such payments are made may be
obtained from the secretary in
that school or college in which
the student is enrolled. Every
settlement is necessary for the.
preparation of diplomas, and in
no case will the University con-
ter a degree at Commencement
p sipdept w bo fails to
phig rquired fee.

HOMEOP HOSPITAL
HAS NEW HEAD
Durand W. Springer has been ap-
pointed superintendent of the Homoe-
opathic hospital, to succeed Dr. aus-
sell Atchison, who has resigned to
enter business in Detroit.
Due to Mr. Springer's war work, it,
is not definitely known when he will
take up his new duties. As national
secretary to the National Educational
association, he made many acquaint-
ances througtout the country. Start-
ing as educational director at Camp'
Custer, he was later appointed by the
government educational director for
the central division of army camps
and canton1ients. This war work will
be a great asset in his new position.
Dr. Atchison has been desirous of
this change for some time, contein-
plating the establishment of a busi-
ness in Detroit.
IN FLIERS COMPLETE
LAST LAP oF, JOURNEY
___________LI
NEARLY 4,000 MILES COVERED
BY NAVY MEN IN EPOCH
FLIGHT
Plymouth, May 31.-Gliding down in-
to the harbor at Plymouth, at 2:26
o'clock London time, the NC-4 com-
pleted the last lap of its epoch making
flight frm America to Jngland.
The actual average flying tim was
between 70 and 80 miles per hour.
The great feat of covering nearly
4,000 miles over the sea is the re-
sult of the navy's systematic experi-
ments to remove the difficulties as-
sociated with a continent to continent
flight
Lieut.-Com. A. C. Read piloted the
ship the entire distance. He spent,
the night at Ferrol where he had
been forced to descend in a river 100
miles north of Lisbon from where he
started for Plymouth.
Eager crowds awaited the arrival of
the men who are making history and
vantage points were rushed to when
word was received that the plane had
been sighted. The rival crews of NC-1
and NC-3 were the first of the many to
congratulate the victorious NC-4 filers.
MEAT PICKERS DECLARE
PRICES ARE O1'DECLINE
Government Stops Buying Meat and
xports Decreae -Sa
,eler
Cbicago, May 31.-A decease in the
price of beef is, "iamediately at
hand," according to a statement is-
sued today by the bureau of public
relations, American Meat Packers as-
sociation.
"Despite the fact that beef already
is cheaper than pork, poultry, and mut-
ton, it probably will decline further
within the next few days," said the
statement. There are several reasons.
Cheaper grass fed cattle are now mov-
ing to market. Exports of beef from
the United States have practically
ceased. The government has stopped
buying.
"It may take a few days for the
lower prices to reach the consumer."
Detroit to Have New Hotel
Detroit, May 31.-Plans were an-
nounce here today for the erection
Tithin the next 8 8months of 0 23
story hotel With 1,100 rooms. The
project, financed by local captial, will
represent an investment of $7,000,000.

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, Ill., May 31.-Michigan won
the Western Conference single and
double tennis matches here today.
Walter Wesbrook, the stellar left
hander for the Wolverines defeated
Henry H. Adams, of Minnesota, 6-1,
6-2, 6-2,
The match was easily won by the
Maize and Blue racqueter, although
the Minnesota man put up a hard fight
at the start of the single matches.
In the doubles the Michigan court
players had a tough deal in defeat-
ing their opponents. The final outcome
of the doubles resulted" in the defeat
of Henry W. Adams and Henry W.
Nortol,, of Minnesota, by Walter Wes-
brook and N. B, Bartz, Jr., 6-4, 7-5, 6-4.
Walter Wesbrook has been display-

ing an exceptional fine brand of tennis
this season. The betting at the start
of the Western Conference was on
Pike, of Chicago, but on Friday the
chances for Michigan walking away
with the meet were more definitely de-
fined,
SPike, of Chicago, was last year's
Big Tennis winner, and the Univer-
sity of Chicago fans expected the Mar-
oon to place first. This is Wesbrook's
first year to participate in the Western
Conference tennis matches, due to the
fact that he was not permitted to en-
ter in meets during his freshman
year.
His left handed shots puzzled his
rivals, and in the singles he took the
matches easily due to his delivery
which was too fast for the opponents
to pound before they flew past them.

WILCOX WINNER oF
INDIANPOLIS RACE1

DePALMA
TWO

COWES IN 'FOURTH;
DRIVERS, ONE JLE-
CHIANIC DIE

(By Associated Press)
Indianapolis, May 31.-Howard Wil-
cox, of Indianapolis, today won the
seventh annual international sweep-
stakes race of 500 miles at the motor
speedway, his time for the distance
being 5:44;21.75. Two drivers, Ar-
thur Thurman and Loiris Lecocq, and
a me ntcian, T.P anbini were kill-
ed during the contest, and two others
were injured.
As a result of his victory Wilcox
wins a prize of $20,000. Fifty thou-
sand dollars was divided amoirg the
first 10 drivers. The other prize win-
ners finished in the order named:
Hearne, Qoux, Alley, DePalma, L.
Chevrolet, Vail, G. Chevrolet, and
Thomas,
Wilcox assumed the lead as the
contest approached the half way mark
and drove consistently throughout. He
had, two stops, once for a tire change
and on the other occasion to take on
gasoline, oil, water and to repair a
,loose steering knuckle. His average
was 87.12 miles an hour. All records
for the Indianapolis speedway were
shattered by DePalma for the first 200
miles.
Arthur Thurman was killed when
his machine turned oyer 4,feb the
race had proT.esseq 0 miles. His
mechanic received a fractured skull
ani was rushed to a hospital, where
he was operated .on 4mmediately.
Lecocq and Banbini were hurged tpQ
death When thei car turned ewer and
caught fire.
RABBI L. M. FRANKLIN WILL
SPEAK AT JEWISH lSERYICE
Rabbi L. M. Franklin of Temple
Beth El, Detroit, will address the Jew-
ish Student Congregation Sunday at
Lane hall. This will be the last
meeting of the year. A chapel for
Jewish students will also be dis-
cussed..

EXAM SCHEDULE. FOR
ENGINEERS ANNOUNCED
PRINTEL FORMS READY FOR DIS-
TRIBUTION BY FIRST OIL.
WEEK
Examination schedules for the en-
gineering college are published below
although the printed announcements
are not ready for distribution. The
forms have already been sent to the
printers but work on them will not be
completed until the early part of next
week when they will be in the secre-
tary's office.
The time for examinations is: 14=,
day classes at 8, the first Thursday
between 8 and 12; Monday at 9, the
first Tuesday from 8 to 12; Monday at
10, the frst Wednesday between 8 and
12; Monday at 11, the first Mond%-y
from 8 to 12; and Monday at 1, Ue-
tween 2 and 6.
Tuesday Classes
The hours for the Tuesday classes
are; Tuesday at 8 from 2 to 6 the first
Tuesday, Tuesday at 9, the second
Monday between 8 and 12; Tuesday at
10 the first Monday from 2 to 6; Tues-
day at 11, between 8 and 12 on the
first Saturday.
The following dates for irregular ex-
aminations have been set: first Tues-
day from 2 to 6, the first Saturday be-
tween 2 and 6, the second Wedngsay
from 8 to 12, the second Wednesday
between 2 and 6,, and the second
Thursd gm 8 to 12.
Specific hours for certain courses
,were set to avoid conflicts, and the
are: shop 1, the first Wednesfty from
2 to 6, Shop 2 betWeen and 6 on
the first ThurAy, Shop 4, the first
Tuesday between 2 and 6, Drawing 4,°
55, the first Friday from 2 and 6, EL .
1, 2, 5, the first Saturday bwtween 2
and 6, C. E. 2, the filet Tuesday be-
tween 2 and 6, and M. E. 3, second
Wednesday, from 8 to 12.
Four Hour Periods
The examinations are of four hours
as they have always been in the en-
gineering college instead of three
hours as in the lit college. For sev-
eral years the engineering college has
used the system of four one hour blue
books during the examination period,
but this has been abolished in favor
of the old method.

ADELPHI FRESHMENa
DEFEAT ALPHA NU
Adelphi, upholding the affirmative
,of the question of the "Prohibition of)
,European Immigration to the U. S.,'
,defeated Alpha Nu .in the fifth annual
freshman debate for the Delta Sigma
Rho loving cup, the decision of the
judges being unanimously for the af-
firmative.,
The loving cup is to be held per-
manently by the society winning three{
successive debates, or the first to win
four out of seven debates. Last'night's
argument put Adelphi in the lead, theyf
having taken the first two debates,
while Alpha Nu won the second two.
The members of the Adelph team
,were: Joseph C. Morris, Louis Gott-
lieb and Abraham Baron; the Alpha
Nu debaters being Wilber M. See-
ley, Claude Van Patten and Robertt
Ritter.
WILL HELP EX7SOLOIERS
GBET TRAVEL ALLOWNCE
LEO J. KENNEDY, K. OF C SECRE-
TARY ESTABLISHES OFFICE
TO HELP MEN
Leo J. Kennedy, secretary of the
Knighks of Columbus war activities
here, will act as notary public in order
to aid honorably discharged soldiers
to file their claims for additional trav-
el allowance. He may be found in his
office above Calkins drug store any
day including Sunday.
Allow Five Cents a Mile
Additional travel allowance of five
cents per mile may be claimed by;
all men whose place of residence is ata
a greater distance from their place of
discharge than the place of their mus-
ter into service. If in the affidavit
made at the time .of his discharge, the
placed named as his actual .residence
coincides with that stated on his serv-I
Ive record, the claim will be immedi-
ately allowed.
Application blanks, ncludig the
necessary affidavit, may be obtained
from any agency organrzed to aid
soldiers, or a recruiting station. This
affidavit mu.t be accompanied by a
true ry of the discharge certificate.
or by the original.
Must Subadi Papers
Claiments are advised to sue a copy
of their discharge In order to elimin-
ate the possibility of the loss of the
original. The copy submitted for the
payment of the $60 bonus and now on
file in the sone finance office, will be
accepted instead. If so it must be
stated in the claim.
Settlement will not be accomplished
with the same rapidity as that obtain-
ed in the payment of the bonus, due
to the necessary verification by the
war department and, the mileage cal-
culations. Extra correspondence -con-
taining requests of expediated action
will only delay matters more.
GERMANY RECLARES AGAIN
OHE WILL REFUSE TO SIGN.
Berlin, May 3L--The German for-
eign office reiterated catigorically, and
emphatieaIy today, a statement on
behalf of the cabinet on May 20, that
"Germany declines to sign the terms
laid before it."
In the meantime the statement,
which was originally given to the As-
sociated Press has been circulated
throughout Germany by the official
Wolff bureau with credit to the Asso-
ciated Press.

BOWERMAN, LANGENHA NODE,
AND COOPER HEAVY MICH-
IGAN HITTERS
LUNDGREN SQUAD HITS
ARROWSMITH AT WILL
Univ of Ilinois Rooters Fall to Tease
Suckers into Batting Rally .:.
in Seventh
(Special to the Daily)
Champaign, Ill., May 31.-Michigan
pinched the Big Ten baseball pen-
nant today by defeating the Illinois
nine 7 to 0 before a large crgw4 of
,spectators.
The baseball game today was one of
the best played by the Wolverines
this season. Parks was in excellent
;form and pitched marvelous ball.
Every member on the squad co-oper-
ated in the putouts, placing their
fielding averages higher than in ay
previous contest. The bating of Coach
Lundgren's proteges was far' spe-
rior to that in the first Western Con
ference baseball games. Knode was
the star of the clash, slamming out
a homer in the second and bringing
in Parks.
Michigan Can Lose Two Games
Michigan's victory this afternoon
,won the Western Conference pennant,
Illinois has two more games on her
schedule, and if they win both of
them, the final percentage will be .727.
One of these contests, however, are
with Michigan at Ann Arbor, and. it
is likely that they will end the race
this year at the .636 mark.
Ohio State has but one more game
to her credit and if it is won, the
final ercentage will be 750. Michigan,
on the other hand, has two contests
to play before the end of the sea-
son. If the Maize and Blue squad
breaks even in the Icoming games the
,final percentage will be .875. The
aWolverines can lose both of the con-
tests and win the laurels of the Big
Ten for the percentage would 'then be
.778.
Captain Knode Shows Form
Captain Knode has shown wonder-
,ful form throughout the entire seas-
son. His batting'and fielding percent-
sages are among the highest on the
steam. In batting he heads the , list,
while in fielding he ranks third. His
best feat was the knocking of a 4orne
,run in today's game. Bowercan, Lan-
genhan, and Cooper are the other
Maize and Blue heavy biters.
Parks has shown splendid form in
,pitchng, winning six Big Ten gamrs
,with a large number of strikeouts to
his credit Glenn hurled for the Wol-
verines one Western Conference game,
,Scheidler and Parks being utilized by
the coach during the preliminary
,games and the first contests when the
weather was somewhat chilly.
Knode Leads Batting sally
Captain Knode led the first bat-
ting rally of the Wolverines in the
,first inning, knocking a single and
reaching second on a stolen base.
Cooper then connected with the ball
for a two bagger to Barklge, who
muffed it. Knode ran home for the
first run of the day on a passed ball
with bases full. Garrett fanned and
Karpus was put out at the initial
sack, ending the first round.
The second round was more dis-
astrous to the Illini team, for the
Michiganders procured four runs. ''his
rally started with a single by Langen-
han, a sacrifice by Froemke, and a
three .bagger by Huber. Parks then
pasted the ball to center field, Huber
(Continued from ,age one)

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON 4N- DiVI
10 :30,-Leonar A. Barrett speaks on "Satisfaction."
6:00 P. M.-Prof. T. E. Rankin concludes his addresses to young people.

_l

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan