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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 31, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'THE MICHIGAN DAILY

UATURDAY,

F#=

VICIAL 4 NWSPAPER AT 'THEX
UNIVE~RSITY OF MICHIGAN
fshed every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
lof Student Publications.
ER OF TRE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credited
paper and also the local news pub-
herein.
ed at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
an, as becond class matter.
criptions by carrier or mail, $3.30.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building.
ts: Business. 96o; Editoriatl, 3414.
munications not to exceed 300 words,
d, the siguature not necessarily to ap-
print, but as an evidence of faith, and
of events will be published in The
at the' discretion of the Edtor, if left
nailed to the office.
geed communications will receive no
ration. No manuscript will, be re-
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
nts expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
x Roeser..........Managing Editor

INews from The Other Colleges

d. Carey..............News
Aillar .............. ... City
Marx .............Associate
F. McAllister....... Feature
Eh~llbert ........Telegraph
3. andis.............. Sport
ite Clark......... Women's
Guernsey.......... Women's

Editor:
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Eiditor
Editor
Editor

Colwnbia -- Columbia students of
geography and geology will explore
New York, New England and Penn-
sylvania as a part of the work of the
#iammer session. The course styled
"Field Work in Physiography', will
,consist of practical- field work at the
Gorge of the 'Highlands, Mt. Beacon,
the folded mountains at Catskill, the
northern end of the Great Appalachian.
Mountains, Lake George, Lake Cham-
plain, the Green Mountains, and thes
White Mountains, and along the Hud-
son. The trip will last 12 days.
Washbrn--Plans are now nearly
completed for the Washburn social
center and girls' doritory and con-
structiou will begin this' sumumer. The
new home for Washburn girls will be
onet of the best in the entire country,
with ideal situation,' striking scenery,
eumerous conveniencesa and" homaelike
atmosphere.
Northwestern--The name of Prof s-
sor Lynn Harold Hough has been sug-
,gested for consideration to the trus-
tees of Northwestern university who
are endeavoring to select a successor
to Thomas F. Holgate, who had been
acting president of the university, and
who resigned some time ago. A large
majority of the members of the board
favor the election of Professor Hough,
but a unanimous selection has not yet
been accomplished.
Harvard--The General Education
Board of Harvard has announced an
appropriation of $500,000 toward a
fund of $2,000,000, for the establish-
ment of a- Graduate School of Eiduca-

ikman.,.«...... Dramatic Editor
... . . . Music Editor
..... E.xchange Editor
,h ..........Literary Editor

aser

1F EDITORS
Paul G. Weber
Edgar L~. Rice
k J. P. Hart
n Clarkson

Illinois. The test consists of a few
.simple questions which will tend to
show the inherent capabilities of the
men entering engineering.
Wtomen
Girls who want to earn money this,
summer are advised to inquire of Miss
Louise Potter in Barbour gymnasium.
Miss Potter, has several opportunities
for University women.
All who are interested in going to°
the Y. W. C. A. camp at Lake Geneva
this summer should consult Huldah
Bancroft in Barbour gymnasium or
call Rose Sturmer, '20.
Girls who would like to lead Girls'
clubs this summer are requested to
call FYrances Wesloy. 21., who is in
chirg, of this work.
Girls who wish to be junior advisors
neat~ year should sign the list in Bar-;
bour gymnasium, Miss Loluse Potter
has charge of this list.
Anot'her sophomore-freshman game
will be played at34 'f 'cloclk on Mon-c
day afternoon on Palmer gIeld. he
sophomores have ohaljlenged the fresh-
men, after one defeat s.t their hands.
Dockers In 13 boour gymnasium
must be emptied by 4;3~0 o'clock
Tuesday' afternoon. F'reshmen' as well
as sophomores must comply with this
ruling.
Soaphomores who have not made ap-
pointments for posture examinations
are 'required to do so immediately.
These appointment examinatio, a will
begin at $:30 o'olock Mon4~dy morning,
Girls who have marls appointments era
reminded to keep them,
Gold, Disov ered In 0040&u fCongo
Brussels, May 30.-Tho Belgian Col-
onial oiffce has received word of recent
important discoveries by gold pros-
pectors in the Ulle district (Belgian
Congo) belonging to the TBlgian state.

SOCIAL WORKERS
AID WAR VICTIMS
Public interest in mental diseases,
aroused by sympathy for shell-shock
patients has created a demand for so-
cial workers trained in psychiatry, far
exceeding the present supply.
Although social work as an aid to
medical treatment of mental diseases,
has been in use for many years, the!
first training course of tis kind was
offered this year at Smith college. A
similar course will be offered this
summer at the Smith College Training
School of Social Work. The fifty
graduates of the original tra~ining
'school were quickly' absorbed and
many more are wanted immediately.
Special' emphasis is to be given "to
this work at the national conference of
social work, to be held June 1 at At-
lantic City. Both social workers and
physicians will speak on this subject
at the conference. Due to the shortage
of trained workers, college graduates
are given unusual opportunities in
this field.

All work guaranteed

BOOK STORE j
SDon't Fail to Visit Our New Lunch Room

SENIORS==See to It Early
The matter of your Engraving for Graduation-
ViitngCards

Plate and 100 Cards

Try Our Strawberry Shortcake

K~niglhts of Coluimbus Still on jump
Dublin, May 30.- The 'Knights of
Columbus ha~ve established in Dublin
an admirably equipped hotel for the
accommodation of United States sold-
iers and sailors 44 leave here, This is
the first institution of the Knights of
'Columbus fin Ireland and it is very
cordially welcomed.
Base Ball Supplies of all kinds at
Cushtng's.--Adv,
'Student. ro%4 The D1.----. .I

Everything; the Best

- - 15$2.2 to $4.50

Plate Printing

-$1.25 per hundred cards

Tuttle's Lunch Room.

REPORTERS
as H. Adams john 4.IvicMauis
d B. Marshall C. H. Murchison
llis Mary 1). Lane
as Schermerhorn John I. Dakin
r W. Brown Logan Trumbull
merson Swart Stewart Baxter
Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
BUSINESS STAFF
I Makinson.G....... Business Manager

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

r"
Students of the University of Michigani are 'cordially invited to
inspect our new lir of
PARIS FASHIONS

...Asst. Business
e.. .Asst. Business
e.... .Asst. Business
;er..*.Asst. Business
....Asst. Business1
ner. .Asst. Business

Manager
Maager
Maager
Maager
Manager

McKean
. adwelU
A. N'ewton

STAFF'
PEdward Prielis, Jr.
Henry Whiting 11
J. Duane Miller.
R. A. Sullivan

JUNIOR STAFF
.Curt P.' Schneider Isabelle Farnum;
Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr. Harper' Moore
James A. Kennedy, Jr.. Arthur L. Glazier'
SATURDAY, MAY 31, 1919.
,ssue Editor--Herbert R. Slusser
A BAD) RISK
A fire ins,.urance expert recently
passing through Ann Arbor unofficial-
ly declared 'University hall and its
two wings to be a thoroughly bad risk.
A thoroughly bad risk from the in-
surance writer's ,viewpoint is a thor-
oughly dangerous risk from the view-
point of the persons involved, and the
persons involved in this case are the
numerous students and professors
whose_ work takes them to this build-
ing every day.
o IMason hall and South Wing are per-
haps the oldest structures on the cam-
pus and were built in days when fire-
proof buildings were unknown,. Con-
sequently, their interiors, including
all sBairways, are _a mass of dry, sea-
soned timber which but requires the
proverbial spark.
Four floors, 'narrow wooden stair-
ways, no connections between the up-,
per corridors, and no fire-escapes!
It is doubtful whether a similar sit-
uation in a privately owned building
would escape. the authorities for long.
It has, however, ,persisted in a state-
owned institution of learning for sev-
eral years.
THE~ HEALTH OF THE STUDENT
COMES FIRST
The University-needs a new build-
ing in which to house its Health sere-

tion there. The university has long
had this enterprise in view, and the
purposes of the work of education
call for a graduate institution with
ample equipment for research, in-
cluding a laboratory and a school,
with an adequate staff of specialists,'
and with, a body of students capable of
advanced study based on a college
education and experience in teaching
and school administration.
Cornell-An alumni glee club is be-
jlng formed to sing during the Semi-
Centennial celebration at Cornell.
g2etters are being, sent out to all
former members of the Glee club, and
it is hoped that much of the former
talent will be displayed at the various
functions *t which they will ap-
pear.
Kansas-Believing in uniform dress
for womien students, feminine K . U.
has stepped out en masse in the bril-
liant sweater with the ruffle around
the waist, and there will be no diffi-
culty in distinguishing Kansas uni-
versity women all over the state this
fucmer.
Illtnois-In an attempt to determine
whether the prospective engineer has
the. inherent qualities necessary to
success in this line, aptitude tests are
to be given to all engineering stu-
dents and faculty at the University of
"CDiamonds"l
Diamonds are bought for a life-
tim~eand their choosing should be
a matter of much discrimination.
Here you may select in safety--our
diamonds are accurately described'
in every detail; they are of good
quality and sold at a modest profit

Yer ey sioiin fAt end weir,
Itays to ash for Arrows.
OTT. M- 'EABQCO 00.INC. MAKERS

Newest materials, newest models, newest
lowest prices

colorings,

and

Novelties in Tailored Suits, Gowns
and Dresses

ar .......'f

CLEARANCE

See thbe New Ciartfte. Case
AT THE
CITY CIGAR STORE
110O'LE.HURON ST.,
t I .

jo

DRESSES, CAPES, DOLMANS
SUITS, AND PETTICOATS

Ospeakdablel Scisutmfo, Orles
EYE
EXAMINIATIONS-
Plume 5;ao r apuistuwilt
EmiliHArno Id
Qptonmetrsst 220 . Nair $1
Try ou~r HOME.-MADE
CANDIES I

THE DRESSES

I

I-

$25 to

$30 dresses .. . .. ... .. .. . .. . . .. . ...$10,5
15 taffeta and-crepe de chine frocks, and 7 serge dresses
are in this group.
$4.0 dresses . .. .. . ... . ... . .. .. .. ... $25.75
21 silk dresses in foulard, taffeta, and crepe de chine.

$35 to

THE WRAPS

$25 to $29.50 values..
$32.50, to $40 values .. .
$42.50 to $50 values..
$55 to $75 values..... ,.

"*" @ g "" r " " "" " ...
" 0ge g~ gee..."

. $14.75
. $25.75
$35.75
. $45.75

There has long, been a feeling on the
campus that the present building is
thorougly inadequate and the Health
service authorities have recently ver-
iced this opinion.
The building is already taxed beyond
its capacity for treating cases, and
'with the inevitable'increase in enroll-
inent next year, there is bound to re-
sult a congestion which cannot be ig-
nored.
-Increased facilities would make it
possible to give all physical examina-
tions at the Health service rather than
in the gymnasiums. It is also possi-
ble that a large number of 'cases could
~be treated which must now be cared
for at the University hospitals.
This department performs too great
a function in the interests of the stu-
dent body to be slightingly dealt with.
It has been estimated that the health
conditions 'in the University are not
surpassed in any similar community
fn the country.
-The need of the Health service for'
larger quarters should be given the
attention that it deserves.
Have you secured any germs offthle
eomnmon roller-towel in the Economics

ISchlanderer.
& SeyfriedI
LIBERTY STREET
Northwestern.
University Law School
Founded 1859
John IL Wigmnore, Dean
ANNOUNCES
That new students may enter at be-
ginning of the fourth term, June 19,
Inease in Requirements for Admis-
Ision. and Graduation.
IAdmission: After September 1, 1919,
studentts entering for the first time,
will be required to submit proof of
the satisfactory completion of three
years of college study.
Graduation- Four. years (or 36
mronths) of residence study is requir-
ed. except that students entering the
Law School with a bachelor's degree
representh g a four-year course in an
approvied college, may complete the
course in',three years (or 27 mnonths).
For detailed information address the
Secetary of the Law School,
Northwestern U-niversity Bldg.,
Lake and Dearborn Stse"

I

THE SUITS

WGholesome4
M&A 4WS OIA)AT,
M~E SUGAR BOWL
lrbope 98ol I k, u l8t
DETROIT XNT P )LI
Between Detroit, ! A09 arprad J4ckson
(ICpntrgl Stahdsrd Tiraf)-
Detroit Limilted and Expre;s Cas- :roa.
in., and hourly to 8: o p. In.
Jackson Limjtd 444 Exp ress gay*-- 7:4
a. in., and every hour to $ 48 p. tn. (E;*
presses mAke lopti. stops west 'of Aqp Arbor.)
Local Gars Frost Sound--o op.. :,.9 :e5 A.
In. and every two hours to 9:q5 p. m", 10:49
p. mn. To Ypsilanti only, ;; :4S p. Mn., 18 49
a. mn,, ti::o a. m...and to, Saline, chengoat
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m.a and
11:2o p. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open froam 11:30 a. M. to 12:001p,.m.
Phone 1620B

$32.50 to $40 values .
$45 to $50 values .. .. .
$52 to $60 values.... .
$65 to $70 values .... .

t f g " "g"" ""o" ee t
" "e" e .s "g "e "g....."
* . e g g g * ~* e g g oa

. $21.75'
$29.75
. $35.75,
. $45.75

'THIE PETTICOATS-
$5.95 silk petticoats. . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.79
Skirts of taffeta and silk jersey in rose, blue, navy,
purple, green, and beige.

314 s. state St.

Aus Arbor

I'

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AonnArbor Savings Dank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $480,000.00
Resources ........ $94,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

1

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