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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 20, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-20

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TJE, DAILY
W0c
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
TH. CAMPUS

AN MA

_.

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

I

VOL. XXVI. No. 162. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 20, 1916. PRICE FIVE CENTS

SOPHS ICTORIOUS
IN TUG-OFWAR
MORE GAMES TODAY
SECOND YEAR MEN TAKE TWO OF
THREE CONTESTS; YEAR-
LING HEAVIES WIN
OTHER EVENTS THIS MORNING
Freshmen Must "Come Back" Today
in Order to Come out Ahead
in Final Count
* *
* RELAY RACES AND PUSHBALL *
* CONTEST COME OFF TODAY *
* First event starts at 9:30 *
* o'clock at South Ferry field. *
* Freshmen meet at flagpole at *
* 9:00 o'clock, sophs in front of *
* Memorial hall at the same time. *
* EVERYBODY OUT-SHOW *
YOUR CLASS SPIRIT. ,
* *
Steady rain falling for several hours
yesterday afternoon, did not succeed
in dampening the spirits of the sec-
ond year men and they romped away
with two of the tug-of-war events on
the banks of the Huron with com-
parative ease. The third event, that
of the heavyweight teams, went to the
yearlings after a hard tussle lasting
the full' 20 minutes. At the end of
that time the fresh had the rope 24
feet nearer their bank.
At 9:30 o'clock this morning the
other two spring contests will be held
on South Ferry field, the obstacle re-
lay races being the first event on the
program. Three different races will
be run and 96 men will be used by
the underclasses in these contests.
Immediately following the relays, the
pushball contest will start. The new
rules, among which is one providing
for the big spherical bag to start and
remain off the ground during the four
quarters of the contest, will be in
force. Other provisions for safety
have also been made.
The freshmen will have to "come
back" today as they lost two tug-of-
(Continued on Page Six)
MAY GARGOYLE OUT YESTERDAY
Leading Editorial of "Pirate Number"
Terms Secret Society Farcical
Replete with wit and humor, the
"Pirate Number" of the Gargoyle ap-
peared at noon upon the campus yes-
terday. Primarily the shafts of wit
were directed at the secret societies
of Michigan, but other institutions as
well come in for their share of the
barbed thrusts.
"The farcical feature of Michigan's
life," says the leading editorial, en-
titled "Michigan's Bogey," "is the se-
cret society bogey. Freshmen whisper
about them, sophomores pine for them,
juniors work for them, and smlors
sneer at them. The changing view-
point comes from being behind the
scenes. If the campus as a whole

knew the character of these 'honor
societies', men would be condoled in-
stead of being congratulated on being
elected to them.
"Primarily, there are too many se-
cret societies at Michigan. A pin is
no longer an honor but a decoration.
Capable men belong to three, four, and
five, with the result that .no single so-
ciety benefits by their membership;
they have forgotten their fundamen-
tal purpose--and the present system of
election is wholly and absolutely
wrong."
Postponed Band Concert Next Week
The band concert which was to have
been held last night was postponed,
due to the fact that several members
wished to hear McCormack. A con-
cert will most probably be given next
week.'

MWCOMACK SCORES BIG
S9UCSS AT FESTITAL
All Siace in Auditorium filled; Last
Two Concerts =n series to
Be Given Today
Every available place in Hill au-
ditcrium was taken last evening when
John McCormack, the most popular
singer in this country, appeared as so-
loist with the Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra.
This gifted singer presented two
well known arias and a group of
songs, and received the greatest dva-
tion which has been given any festi-
val artist thus far. He possesses a
beautiful clear, tenor voice, unique in
its fullness and pleasing quality. Mr.
McCormacks enunciation was pr--
feet, and all but one of his renditions
were in English.
During the program Mr. McCormack
responded to four encores, which in-
cluded "Mother Machree," "I Hear You
Calling Me" and "Oh Believe Me, If
All Those Endearing Young Charms."
All of the songs were sung with great
depth of reeling and in an artistic
manner.
The orchestral numbers were also
pleasing. The opening number was
Beethoven's Ovrture, "Fidelio," and
was bright and brilliant in character.
The Suite. Op. 10, by Dohmanyi, was
beautifvily played, the scherzo move-
ment being especially impressive. The
closing number was the love sen
from "F'eursnot," by Strauss.
At the afternoon concert yesterday,
about 400 school children, assisted by
several soloists and the Chicago Sym-
phony orchestra, presented Pierne's
"Children at Bethlehem." This work
was preceded by "Silent Night," which
was very effectively sung by the chil-
dren. The principle solo part was
taken by Miss Mabel Garrison, who
made such a favorable impression at
the Thursday evening concert. The
(Continued on Page Six)
ATTEMPT TO HAZE COUNCILMAN
Sophs Take W. 1. Shafer for Yearling
WhenI le Wears Fresh Cap
By means of a clever, though not
very well applauded ruse, Wilson M.
Shafer, '16, a member of the student4
council, was enabled to "put one over"
on a gathering of sophomores last
night. Shortly after 11:00 o'clock the
sophomores were passing Huston's
when the councilman appeared wear-
ing a fresh cap. He was immediately
seized by the laughing mob who called
for a dance, a song and a high school
yell. Shafer suddenly turned upon his
captors, informing them that he was,
a senior and demanded that they dis-
perse at once, threatening to divulge
their names if he was not obeyed.
He was greeted with laughter, and
the second year men, who evidently
disgusted at the trick put upon them,
proceeded to draw him into a lengthyr
and rather heated argument. Hazing,
said the councilman, had been super-
ceded by the various contests, and
was moreover forbidden by academic
law.
After some rather pertinent ques-
tions put to him by the sophomores,
they allowed him to depart and shortly

after dispersed. Some of the alleged
hazing had been indulged in during
the early part of the evening, but no
mishaps occurred, both hazers and
their captives being in high good hu-
mor, and all evidently enjoying the
sport.
LAST UNION DANCE COMES
TONIGHT IN BARBOUR GYM
The last Union dance to be held
in Barbour gymnasium takes place to-
night. This will also be the last Union
dance until the banquet hall has been
moved. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Butler
will be the chaperons for tonight's oc-
casion. Dancing will last from 8:20
o'clock to 11:30 o'clock.
Because of the unsettled conditions
at the clubhouse, the Cotton Ball,
which was advertised for May 29, has
been indefinitely postponed.

TO' GIVE CREDIT
FOR ATTENDANCE
ATMILITARY CAMP
REGENTS GRANT ENGINEERING
FACULTY'S PETITION FOR
THIS SUMMER
ADOPT $1,900,000 BUDGET
Name June 2S Date of Angelllemori-
al Service; Accept $15,000 in
Gifts
National preparedness was fitfully
recognized at the regents' meeting held
here yesterday, when the board, by
a unanimous vote, agreed to give two
and three hours' credit to those stu-
dents enrolled in the engineering col-
lege who attended any of the govern-
ment military camps for a period of
five weeks this summer and present-
ed a certificate to that effect to the fac-
ulty of the engineering college.
Michigan 'is the second university
in the country to have taken this1
step, Dartmouth having decided to
give her students three hours' credit
for summer military work several
months ago.
A resolution making the books and
pamphlets of the university library
available for use throughout the state
by high school students and other
civic organizations interested in de-
bating and kindred subjects, was re-
ferred to the library committee for
action, and it is considered likely that
favorable action in the matter will be
taken in the near future.
The annualsbudget, approximating
$1,900,000, was apportioned by the
board, this sum being an increase of1
approximately $100,000 over the bud-l
get of the university last year.
The board ratified the action of the;
university senate in naming June 281
as the date forthe Angell memorial
services, at the same time extending
a vote of thanks to the heir of the
late president-emeritus for a gift ofE
500 books on international law andI
kindred subjects which were present-1
ed. to the university.t
A resolution was passed by the board1
to the effect that the president's house1
on the campus "shall be maintained
for the purpose for which it was built."
It is not considered likely that Pres.I
Harry B. Hutchins will move into the'
building and it is expected that it will
remain vacant until a successor tot
President Hutchins shall have beenf
appointed at some time in the future.e
A gift of $10,000. from the late Mrs.
Elia Walker, of Chicago, was accept-
ed by the regents for the purpose of
founding two scholarships in memory1
of John Pitt Marsh and Fannie Ran-E
som Marsh. An anonymous gift of
$5,006 was also accepted for the pur-
pose of establishing a loan fund to be1
administered under the direction of'
the president of the university.
. By a special resolution, C. A. Lud-
wig was appointed to the Emma J.
Cole fellowship in botany for the year
1916-1917.
The board voted to accept the of-
fer of the Liberty Motor Car company,
of Detroit, for the maintenance of two
University 6f Michigan students at

the Plattsburg military camp this
summer, and the president was ap-
pointed to fill the two positions from
the student body.
A request for the use of Hill audi-+
torium for a lecture on prohibition by
ex Governor Sulzer, of New York, was
denied by the board because of the
policy of the university that no lec-
(Continued on Page Six)

ENI, FUNSTON SAYS HE
CAN HANDLE SITUATION

RAIDS BY NEW BANDIT LEADERS
COMPLICATEIEXICgN SITUATION;
AMERICAN EXPEOITION HALTED

ExprI0ee
ifigtt

Apprehension That Clash
Result, But Has Ade-
quate Forlce

Washington, May 19.-Declaring
that he was able to handle the situa-
tion should it grow serious, General
Frederick Funston mrormed the war
department today that ill feeling has
developed between the Americans and
Mexicans at Douglas, Arizona, result-
ing from the action local authorities
have taken regarding cattle illegally
imported across the line from the
Mexican side.-
General Funston expressed appre-
hension that a clash might result but
said that the force of regulars was
adjusted to cope with any further
trouble. No confirmation had been
received at the war department at a
late hour tonight of press reports
from El Paso that the special board
which has been investigating the
death of Sergeant Harry Furman of
the machine gun company of the 23rd
Infantry has found that the soldier
had been killed on the American side
and his body dragged across the
border.
(Continued on Page Six)
EXHIBIT ENDSFTER
DRAWING 20000 PEOPLE
Engineering Dsplay Closes After
a Successful Final .
Day
-W [
With a total estimated attendance oft
more than 20000 visitors, the third
Engineering Exhibit came to a closet
last night after scoring a complete
success in every department. The at-t
tendtance exceeds that of year before'
last by about 3,000.
From all the visitors, from lits, laws,
medics and pharmics, faculty and
visitors at large the engineers receiv-
ed enthusiastic expressions of com-
mendation. The student exhibitors
have well succeeded in accomplishing
the purpose of the exhibit, which is
best stated by quoting from the first
page of the souvenir program, a copy
of which was given to each visitor.
Many requests were received by the
men in charge of the exhibit to have1
it open on Saturday. This request
could not be granted, however, since
the exhibitors will have to put thet
exhibit rooms into condition for class-
es on Monday morning.,
The feature of the exhibit yesterday
was the personally conducted tour1
which Dean Cooley took about the ex-
hibit. A freshman guide was detailed1
especially for the purpose. He found
upon questioning that the dean was
willing to be informed upon most of
the points of the exhibit, and that he
was an eager seeker after information
upon technical matters.
With such an opportunity the guide
grew so elated that he needed but the
slightest suggestion to explain the
most mysterious exhibit. For instance,
it needed but the slightest questioning
attitude on the dean's part as to why
a water-turbine wheel goes around to
have the enthusiastic guide enter upon
an explanation of the phenomena.
Juniors Elect Student Councilmen
Verne E. Burnett was elected stu-
dent councilman at a meeting of the
junior lit class yesterday. Ralph M.
Carson will continue to serve until
next February. Junior medics chose
H. L. Keim as their representative to

I the council. I

* ** ** * * * * * * * *
* *
* Nei icRules in Pusiball Contest *
* ___ _*
* Rule 4. The ball shall start *
* and remain off the ground dur- *
* ing the entire period of active *
* contest. *
Rule 5. The two classes shall *
* form on opposite sides of the
* ball, the foremost men of each *
* side upholding it. *
* Rule 7. No person shall get
* upon the shoulders of any other *
* contestant.
* Rule 8. There shall be no *
* rushing of any description from *
* outside the main body. *
.11.
* * * * * * * * * * * *
GAR N ETSD EEAT
W OLVERINES -3
Swarthimore Vitorious in Loose Game
Largely Through Errors by
Michigan.
TO PLAY PENNSYLVANIA TODAY
Swarthmore, Pa., May 19.-Michigan
lost to Swarthmore today in a slow
and loosely played game of ball by the
score of eight to three. While the
Garnets played faultless ball, the Wol-
verines made eight errors, many of
them being responsible for runs.
Michigan drew first blood in thesec-
ond inning, when Thomas doubled and
was brought in by a single fom
Dunne's bat. Swarthmore came right'
back in their half of the frame and
(Continued on rage Six)
IWHAT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Flair and slightly warmer.
TOD)AY
51:30 o'clock-Relay races and push-
ball contests.
2:00 o'clock-Band meets in front of
University hall for Deland Stanford
track meet.
2:00 o'clock-Senior lits vs. fresh
Tits, baseball, Ferry field.
2:30 o'clock-Fifth cocert of May
Festival, Hill auditorium.
3:30 o'clock-i-lits vs. J-medics,
baseball, Ferry field.
3:30 o'clock-Al-Fresh vs. Polish
Seminary, baseball, Ferry field.
7:00 o'clock-Upper Room. Bible class
meets, 444 South State street.
8:00 o'clock-Sixth concert of May
Festival, Hill auditorium.
8:30 o'clock-Union weekly dance,
Barbour gymnasium.

PLACIDE VILLENEZA, EX-VILIA
OUTLAW, AN) JOSE CLAVEZ
JOIN FORCES
STEAL HORSES AND PROVISIONS
Rosalio Hernandez, Another Leader,
Now 165 Miles Below Border
'With 300 Armed Followers
El Paso, May 19.-Another raid over
the boundary line into Texas and the
possibility of sudden trouble of a simi-
lar nature in the future have halted
the expeditions of American forces in-
to Mexico south of the Big Bend coun-
try of Texas.
Placide Villeneza, a Villa bandit re-
ported killed in a fight with troops
of Dominguez near Ojinaga several
weeks ago, has joined forces with Jose
Clavez, another bandit leader; and they
are stealing the horses on both sides
of the river.
The first theft was made from the
ranch of Buck Poole, where they took
ten head of horses near Praesidio,
Texas. News reached here today that
they also raided the ranch of Felipe
Caldez, 60 miles from Praesidio, tak-
ing a number of horses and supplies.
It is generallythought they are get-
ting new mounts for the purpose of
committing raids into Texas towns.
This same band came from the vicin-
ity of Lajitas, and it is said some of
the members were in the band which
raided Glenn Springs. The total force
is about 300 to 500 men.
As a result of these new raids pur-
suit of Mexican bandits who raided
Glenn Springs two weeks ago -to-
night is to be given up and the Ameri-
can government for the present will
content itself with a thorough polic-
ing of the American country in the
Big Bend'
In additioi to the cavalry now pur-
suing the bandits in Mexico, whose
mission was declared ended when it
overtook the bandits and rescued
Jesse Deemer sand his two employees,
another regiment is to be sent there
from General Pershing's command
now in western Chihuahua.
The Sixth Cavalry came out of Mex-
ico today, arriving at Columbus and
going into camp there. As soon as
they rest up from their long march
from the vicinity of Namiquipa, the
troopers will be sent to Marathon for
distribution in the Big Bend. = In the
event that General Pershing needs any
more men with him in Mexico, the
regiments of the New Mexico nation-
al guard will be sent in.
It became known today that the
American forces in Mexico south of
the Big Bend country have been turn-
ed about and started on their way
back to Texas. They penetrated over
100 miles into Mexico and encountered
but one force of bandits, and these es-
caped after abandoning Deemer and
his men.
The fact that additional cavalry is
not available to extend the line of
communication and that motor trucks
are not, available in sufficient num-
bers to keep supplies going to the
troops is considered responsible for
the abandonment of the expedition.
Rosalio Hernandez with 300 armed
followers is at Rancho de Eucimillas,
near Laguna de Joco, 165 miles south
of the border and 40 miles south of
where the American expedition artil-

lery camped Thursday. According to
reports, Hernandez had 500 men al-
together under his command with
him.
Hernandez is said to be a political
freeman, not subjecting himself or
his followers to the dictums of either
Carranza or Villa. It is not known
for certain whether or not the Glenn

9:00 o'clock - University
Packard academy.

dance,l

TOMORROW
o'clock-J. M. Wells

10:30,
at First
sion for

speaksl

Baptist church on "The Pas-
the Perfect."

U-NOTICES
Tickets for the University dance
at the Packard academy on sale from
11:00 o'clock to 12:00 o'clock, U-hall.
Seniors desiring to enter the All-
Senior tennis tournament give their
names to H. C. Lange today. Schedule
will be arranged.
All juniors entered in class tennis
report to John Codd at Varsity courts
at 11:30 o'clock Saturday, or call him
at 131.
All sophomores desiring to make
the soph tennis team, call up J. D.
Watts, between 8:00 o'clock and 9:00
o'clock this morning, at 1855.
All members of the University golf

Presbyterian Church
Huronand Division Streets ;

Leonard A Barrett

Speaks- -
SUNDAY, 10:30 A. M.

4

association will meet at 2:30 o'clock Springs and Boquillas
on the first tee Sunday afternoon. Pur- I acting under his orders,
pose it to hold a blind bogey tour- he made no effort to ap:
nament at that time. from their retreat.

raiders were
but it is said

Theme: "Fundamental Motives."

I

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