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October 22, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

Ce

1 l~I Ya

D~il-y

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY TI
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVII. No. 16.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1915.

PRICE FIVE

PROMISE YELLFEST
AT TONIGHT'S BIGI
ROOTING SESSION~t
PROF. .l W. AIGLER AND W. A. P.
JOhN, '1-6, WILL TALK AT
"PEP" MEETING
WATK REPRESENTS ALUMNI
Hen Will Exclhange Athletic Coupons
for Tickets at Union; Woimen
at U hall

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M3 A. C. Mass Meeting

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When--Tonight, 7:30 sharp;
doors open 7:10.
Wlh-re-Hill auditorium.
Music--Michigan band.
Noise--Yells led by "Hal"
Smith.
Speakers--Prof. R. W. Aigler,
W. A. P. John, "Jim" Watkins.
Tickets given, out today as
follows:
Men-Michigan Union, from,
10:00 on.
Women-University hall, 10
to 12; 1:30 to.3:30.
Alumni and M. A. C. Support-
ers-Offices of athletic associa-
tion.

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Pillory Holds 12
of 'i6 Lalv Hen
No, the pillory is not obsolete as a
means of public punishment-at least
not on the Michigan campus. Anyone
passing in front of the law building
late yesterday afternoon could not
1:: seeing 1 s2rious-looking senior
x:,: bo rd ast, and apparently wait-
ing , t 2worst. These men were
about to be initiated into Barristers,
senior law honorary society.
The initiation banquet was held at
Mack's tea room last night at 5:00
o'clock, after. which a brief program
was given, Eugene R. McCall acting
as toastmaster. The other speakers
were Dean Henry M. Bates, Dean Al-
fred H. Lloyd, Maxwell Pitkin, '16L,
and John S. Leonard, '16L.
The men taken into the society
were: H. Donald Brown, Gerald S.
Frary, David Kennedy, Frank M. Mc-
Hale, Chester Morse, William C. Mul-
lendore, Maxwell Pitkin, Clyde Row-
an, Werner W. Schroeder, H. Blair
Sutter, I. Lash Thomas and Paul
Thompson.
Americans Battle With Mexicans
San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 21.-A re-
port from Mission, Texas, states that
three dead and eight wounded in the
cavalry and signal corps of the Unit-
ed States forces in Texas and five
Mexican dead is the result of an at-
tack on the United States troops at
Ojodeadua at 1:30 o'clock Thursday
morning.
COUNCIL SENDS LETTER
MAING A PLEA FOR
6OOD SPORTSMANSHIP
Followjing Aetiloi at Last Night's
3Meeting, Circular Letters Will
he Sent to Organizations
WANT COU'ESY TO BE SHOWN
RIAL ROOTERS AND TEAMS

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SCALON HEAK SENIOR
LAWS1 OTHER CLASSES
CHOOSE THEIR OFFICERS
Holton 11. Lowe Elected President of
Senior Medics; Senior Architects
Pick R. S. Westbrook

ERN EST It. TRYSELL
JIDENT OF JUNIOR

MADE PRES-
ARCHITECTS

Genuine, unharnessed "pep" is to
rule tonight's mass meeting in Hill
auditorium, and it is even expected
that Coach Macklin's crew in East
Lansing will hear and heed. Michi-
gan's cheering section is not to be
outdone in Saturday's contest at Ferry
field, and a program has been ar-
ranged for this evening's yell-fest
that will loosen up every loyal chard
in the university.
Promptly at 7:10 the doors of the
auditorium will be thrown open, and
the first of the crowd to enter will
be greeted by the Varsity band, which
will render selections of a nature in-
tended to put the crowd into a recep-
tive mood for the program to follow.
F. F. McKinney, '16L, who will pre-
side, will introduce as faculty repre-
sentative, Prof. R. W. Aigler. W. A.
P. John, '16, managing editor of the'
Gargoyle, will follow with a talk
voicing the spirit with which the stu-
dent body will back the Wolverines
i their clash with the Aggies tomor-
row, and "Jim" Watkins, of 1907 full-
back fame, will present the attitude of
the alumni and Michigan teams of the
past.
W. C. Achi, '17L, will introduce his
new Michigan march, accompanied by
the band. "Hal" Smith will be on
hand to lead the cheering, and will
rehearse the crowd in' some of the
good old Michigan yells which have
not been tried yet this year. Lyn-
don's = will complete the pro-
gram.
No person will be admitted to the
mass meeting who does not hold a
ticket. Men will exchange their cou-
pon No. 35, properly signed, -at the
Michigan Union from 10:00 o'clock
this morning until all are gone.
The 900 tickets covering seats in
the first balcony, which have been
set aside for the women of the uni-
versity, will be distributed in Uni-
versity hall between the hours of
10:00 and 12:00 this morning and from
1:30 to 3:30 this afternoon. The com-
mittee has promis6d to give the wom-
en an opportunity to show their loy-
alty to the team by giving several
yells, and they will no doubt occupy
the entire section reserved for them.
Alumni and M. A. C. supporters who
wish to attend the meeting should
procure tickets at the athletic asso-
ciation in the Ann Arbor Press build-
ing..

SUBJECT
AT

WILL BE BROUGHT UP
TONIGHT'S MASS
MEETING

~ ~ ~ ~
By J. C. B. Parker
Student councilmen took action
last night. in the movement to further
good sportsmanship on the part of
student x ooters and thus to assist in
building up a better and finer Mich-
igan spirit.
Their a ction took the form of a cir-
cular letter which was drawn up and
passed 'and authorized to be sent to
the different fraternities, house clubs
and so(ieties. Vhe letter is couched
in terras not coercive or dictatorial.
It merely is a suggestion and a plea
to the student body.
The context of the letter follows:
To the Student Body of the University:
Michigan has always been known
among universities as being a college
with 'not only a great reputation in
athletics but also with a reputation
for fairness and good sportsmanship.
It is a great thing to be a fighter
'and yet remain courteous and chival-
rous at the same time. Michigan, with
one or two exceptions, has always
been able to do this in the past.
Let's make it traditional!
To do this, it is necessary to make
every student feel his individual re-
sponsibility in doing his share.
We, therefore, ask everyone to do
his part in showing courtesy to visit-
ing rooters and teams.
Let's show not only the best teams
but also the best sportsmanship.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL.
Tonig ht' Michigan students will
meet ini Hill auditorium to help each
other acquire fighting spirit for a
loyal. support of their team at the
gamte against the Aggies tomorrow. It
ha'3 been planned to have one of the
sp.eakers talk to them on the subject
o f good sportsmanship and how nec-
assary it is to the good name of the
unmversity.

SEVERAL SUBSTITUTIONS MADE
IN NOMINATIONS; ELECTIONS
TO FOLLOW SOON
Three senior classes, the laws,
medics and architects, completed their
class elections yesterday.
The successful senior law candi-
dates were as follows: President, Le-
roy Scanlon; vice-president, M. S.
Pitkin; secretary, T'. H. Westlake;
treasurer, Paul Thompson; football
manager, C. Rowen; basketball man-
ager, K. Ferguson; track manager, D.
F. Stiver; baseball manager, R. 0.
Brownell; oratorical delegate,, L. M.
Sprague; sergeant-at-arms, G. Frary.
Senior Medics Elect
The following senior medics were
chosen class officers: President, Hol-
ton M. Lowe; vice-president, Anna G.
Dumont; secretary, Helen A. Moore;
treasurer, W. M. Dugan; basketball
manager, -F. P. Currier; track man-
ager, H. R. John; baseball manager,
S. W. Donaldson.
Senior architects elected the follow-
ing: President, Roland S. Westbrook;
vice-president, Alexander McColl;
secretary, R. E. Lind; treasurer, H.
L. Corsett; athletic manager, George
B. Hammond;- sergeant-at-arms, Louis
Voorhees.
Nominations in the senior pharmic
class will be made at 1:00 o'clock to-
day in room 303, chemical building.
Arrangements have not yet been made
for a senior homeop caucus.
Junior Architect Officers
Junior architects yesterday chose
the following men as class officers:
President, E. H. Trysell; vice-presi-
dent, M. H. Ingall; secretary, R. L.
Shetty; treasurer, C. L. Rothrock;
athletic manager, F. G. Strauss; ser-
geant-at-arms, C. W. Attwood.
Junior laws will hold their election
from 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock this after-
noon in room C, law building. +
Elections in the sophomore class of
the medical school yesterday resulted
as follows: President, T. L. Tolan;
vice-president, Amelia T. Wood; sec-
(Continued on Page Six)
FIRST ISSUE OF GARGOYLE TO
GO ON SALE AT NOON TODAY
Michigan's Humorous Publication to
be Filled With Snappy Art
and Witty Quips
Noon today is the time set for the
appearance of the first issue of the,
Gargoyle, Michigan's humorous pub-
lication. Ten pages of snappy art-
work and more than the usual num-
ber of bright and witty quips and bits
of verse are said to go far toward
making this one of the best numbers
ever published.
A double-page drawing, entitled
"Traveling in the U. S. A.," is a clever
bit of work from the pens of Clark
Smith, ex-'17, and A. D. Conkey, '16.
The three-color cover design by C.
E. Yokubicek, '18A, is pleasing and
attractive to the eye.
Cornell Team Given Ronsing Send-Off
Itlhaca, N. Y., Oct. 21.-Three thou-
sand students gave the Cornell teamt
a rousing send-off for the Cambridge
trip tonight.
"It will take all that Johnnie Har-,
vard has got to beat us," was the
statement of Coach Sharpe. "I be-
lieve that in all my years of experi-
ence, I have never seen such material
as leaves Ithaca tonight. Every man
is prepared to do his best and we ex-
pect to bring back the football to add
to our collection of trophies."

HIT $425 OOMARK(
UNION CLUBHOUSE
CONFIDENCE IN S UTCESS OF IIL-
LiON-DOLLAR PROJECT
TAIKES BIG JUMP
CONCENTRATION WEEK COMING
Daily Reports Will be Sent in During
Next Week's Campaign; De-
trolt Shows Big 'Min
Confidence in the success of the
Michigan Unions million-dollar cam-
paign took another jump yesterday
with the announcement that the grand
total had reached the $425,000 mark,
with the big New York alumni din-
ner scheduled for last night yet to be
heard from.
The alumni total of $325,000 is mov-
ing steadily upward, while the stu-
dent total of $100,000 is expected to
be increased considerably before the
end of the week. The final effort of
the campaign will be made next week,
when the leaders in the work are con-
fident that the grand total will equal
or even exceed the million-dollar
mark set as the goal of the 30-day
canvass.
Detroit Shows Rig Gain
Detroit shows the biggest increase
since the last reports were published,
the committee in that city having se-
cured an even $10,000 in additional
subscriptions during the past week.
The Detroit total is now $129,000, and
the maen in charge of the work there
are confident that they 'ill be able
to raise the remainder of their share,
which has been set at $250,000.
Elaboriate plans have been made by
(Continued on Page Six)
FORMER PRESIDENT TAFT
HA9SWIRED ACCEPTlACE
WILL SPEAK ON PEACE
Oratorical A ssociation and Women's
League Iking -Arrangements
for the Day
WILL PROBABLY ALSO SPEAK
ON NATIONAL PREPARATION
WORLD CONGRESS TO BE DIS-
* CUSSED; POLITICS NOT TO
FIGURE IN LECTURE
Definite information contained in a
telegram from William Howard Taft,
ex-president of the United States, says
that he will speak in Hill auditorium
either November 13 or December 10.
The earlier dates is practically cer-
tain of being chosen.
The Oratorical association and the
Women's league, which are handling
the arrangements for the coming lec-
ture, will be represented by commit-
tees in a joint meeting to be held
within a day or two. The date No-
vember 13 is expected to be decided
upon at this meeting. Other prepara-
tions, as fixing of the admission price,
entertainment of the visitor and the
like, also will be taken into consid-
eration.
Some phase of the ex-president's
views on world peace, a world con-
gress and national preparation will
undoubtedly be touched upon in the

lecture. But according to the speak-
er's custom since his retirement from
ofl^e, no politics will be discussed.
Mr. Taft's presence at Youngstowi,
Ohio, on the night before the 13th of
November affords Michigan the op-
portunity of securing the engagement.
Every other possible date before
Christmas has been filled except the
two offered to the university organ-
izations.

COUNCIL PROVES
FOR RECEPTION TO'
BE, GIN TO AGGIErS
Bat ery of Motor C Irs to Meet Mack-
lin's Squad at Ann Arbor
Station
VIIT 14IVE VISITORS "KEY OF .
CA MPUS" AT MIWOIGAN UNION
PRESENT PENNANTS TO SOPHO-
MORES WHO TOOK THEM
IN FLA RUf H
Preparationj i'or th'e reception
which is to be given the M. A. C.
football team, band and rooters to-
morrow morning occupied a large
share of the attention of the student
council last night.
A battery of 12 pleasure au'tomo-
biles, according to Henry Rummel.
* MT WITH THE ROOTERS *
* Michigan rooters at Satur- *
* day's game will occupy sec- *
* tions AA to II inclusive, in the *
* north stand. *
* M. A. C. student supporters *
* will be located In the south *
* stand, section H, with their *
* alumni backers in sections F *
* and G. *
In order to have a concentrat- *
ed cheering body, the Wolverine *
rooters are urged to fill sections *
Fl', GG, IR and II in the *
* north stand compactly, before *
taking any of the other sec- *
* tions further east. Section II is *
* right on the 50-yard line and *
will be nearly directly opposite *
* the Aggie cheering sections. *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
'14-'16L, head of the special commit-
tee, is to be loaded with the members
of the Aggie squad at the Ann Arbor
station upon the arrival of the special;
train from Lansing, and is to proceed
to the Michigan Union clubhouse at
the head of a procession of musicans
and rooters. At the clubhouse one
(Continued on Page Six)

ALLIES DECIDE TO
SEND .4010 000 MEN
TO BAKAN THEATE
ODECISION REACHED AFTER CO'
FERENCE OF ENTENTE
MINISTERS
SERBIA ADMITS HER PLIG
GermansĀ° Believe That They Will A
tack England Within Two
Months

III

London, Oct. 21.-French and Brit-
ish troops numbering 400,000 will be
sent to the Balkans to-aid the Ser-
bians there and to start an invasion
of Turkey and Bulgaria. This decis-
ion was reached in this week's con-
ference between French War Minister
Millerand' and the cabinet military
committee. Serbia readily admits her
plight and the arrival of the allied
forces will be anxiously awaited.
On the east the Bulgarians have
taken a number of towns, and the
Austro-Germans have succeeded in
cutting off the communications with
Saloniki at two different places. Ser-
bia is in a desperate condition. The
Bulgars will make an effort to pre-
vent the entrance of the allied forces.
Report Capture of 2,000 Serbs
Sofia, Oct. 21.-King Ferdinand has
joined his forces in their artillery en-
gagement at Stacin on the way to Ku?
manavo. Two thousand Serbs are re-
ported to have been captured in the:
Trimok valley.
To Begin Active Work Against Brittin
Berlin, Oct. 21.-In two months Ger-
many will begin active work against
Britain. The successes in tha Bal-
kans and the opening of communica-
tions with Turkey will pave the way
to menacing England by attacking on
the Suez canal and Egypt.
The Germans think that they have
already captured enough of France
and Russia to enable them to leave
those countries alone for a while, but
the Teutons are desirous of striking
a blow at England. When they have
(Continued on Page Six)
EMBA'RGO DONARMS
TO BEREENFORCED
No Arrangement About U. S. Army
Establishing Recognition
of Carranza

i

I WHAT'S GOING ON
TODAY
Senior pharmic elections, room 303,
chemical building, 1:00 o'clock.
Junior law elections, room C, law
building, 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock.
Webster society meets, Webster
rooms, 7:00 o'clock.
Homeopathic banquet, Michigan
Union, 7:00 o'clock.
Alpha Nu meets, Alpha Nu rooms, U

hall, 7:30 o'clock.
Tickets for mass
10:00 o'clock.
Lyceum club meets,
hall, 5:00 o'clock.

meeting, Union,
Oratory room, U-

Mass meeting, Hill auditorium, 7:30
o'clock.
Gargoyle out, noon.
Senior pharmics nominate class offi-
cers, 1:00 o'clock, room 303, chem-
ical building.
Junior laws elect class officers, 4:00
to 6:00 o'clock, room C, law build-
ing.
Soph lits elect class officers, 1:00 to
4:00 o'clock, corridor, University
hall.
Fresh lits elect class officers, 3:00 to
5:30 o'clock, room 101, economics
building.
Fresh dents elect class officers, 11:00
o'clock, amphitheater, dental build-
ing.
TOMORROW
Cross country, race, Waterman gym,
9:45 o'clock.
M. A. C. vs. Michigan, Ferry Field,
2:30 o'clock.
Michigan Union dance, 9:00 o'clock.

Washington, Oct. 1.-The reenforce-
ment of the embargo on arms to Car-
ranza' s foes has been made known
to customs officials, all along the
Mexican border. No arrangement has
been made as to the extent to which
the army will be called upon to es-
tablish the recognition of Carranza,
but it is definitely stated that United
States troops will have charge of the
strict enforcement of the embargo.
Arms will be allowed to pass into
Carranza's territory.
It is reported that Villa is contem-
plating the confiscation of goods its
Mexico and the selling of them in the
United States. This report has, not
been confirmed but all steps are be-
ing taken to prevent the sale of goods
obtained by illegal means.
Villa 'Will Not Quit
El Paso, Texas, Oct. 1.-"Villa will
not quit fighting in Mexico. He is4
determined to free his country from
the ravages of the American moneyed
interests, and will continue to fight
harder than ever to do so," was the
statement made today by the. gen-
eral's brother.
Mining men and Americans arriv-
ing here today from Jurez say that
there are indications of Villa's pre-
paring to evacuate that city.

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015y

The First Issue of-

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will be sod at noon today, on the Campus and on the
IF YOU SEE IT YOU'LL BUY IT---"A LAUGH IN EVERY LINE"
15c -15c

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