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May 17, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-17

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TJ'E DAILY
0c
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

.rirrfr rw irrir ir rw : w

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRIAPH SERVICE BY '
NEW YORK SUN

- --~--~----- - - _______________________________

VOL. XXVI. No. 159.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 17, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

-- -----M

TO GET STUDENT S
VIES ON FERRY
FIELD _QUESTION
WILL POST PETITION BLANKS
yT VARIOUS PLACES
NEAR CAMPUS
TO BE PRESENTED TO REGENTS
Letters from Various Seniors to State
Ideas on Use of
Grounds
Petition blanks advocating the open-
ing of Ferry field on Sunday after-
nons for the purpose of exercise have
been posted at various places about*
the campus, with the aim of securing
lists of students favoring the cause.
At a meeting of the board of Re-
gents these petitions will be presented,
together with a letter from members
of the senior classes of the various
departments. This letter will tell in
specific terms that the field would be
used for tennis, basebal], and any
other corm of exercise in which the
students might see fit to indulge.
The blanks read as follows:
"We, the undersigned, respectfully
petition that the board of regents per-
mit students of the university the use
of Ferry field on gunday afternoons
for the purpose of exercise."
These blanks, which are approved
by influential men on the campus,
have been posted with the aim of dis-
covering just how many students who
have been taking part in the debate
upon the question are in favor of hav-
ing the field opened. They expect in
this way to get an adequate estimate
of the proportion of the student body
which approves of the recent sug-
gestion.
"What will our alumni say about
such a move?" is the question many
students are asking. The feeling that
the graduate body would heartily dis-
approve of any act on the part of the
undergraduates which might draw dis-
approval from the citizens of the
state, has caused a great number to
reserve judgment upon the present
question.
PRESIDENT FELLS EXPERIENCES
Longed to Disassociate Himself from
Office at Times
Washington, May 16.--In a speech
before the National Press club tonight
President Wilson told how he felt
during the crises through which he has
recently been called to pilot this gov-
ernment. His entire speech was de-
voted to an intimate recital of the
President's mental experiences and
observations since he entered the
White House.
Three years ago he made a similar
speech, the only difference being that
he was then on the threshold of his
admihistration, whereas tonight he
was looking backward and giving the
newspaper correspondents the bene-
fit of three years of reflection. The
President told how he sometimes long-
ed to disassociate himself from the
office and even to rent a set of false
whiskers so that he imight be freed
from the attention that his official
character attracted.
DISCOVER BODIES OF TWO
MEN UNDERNEATH SALOON
Dublin, May 16.-A coroner's jury
today found that two men whose bod-
ies had been discovered under the de-
bris of a saloon had died from gunshot
wounds inflicted by soldiers. The jury
expressed the opinion that the mili-
tary evidence was unsatisfactory. The
owner of the saloon testified that the
men had no connection with the re-
volt.

Mai Shoots Family After Repentance
South Bend, Ind., May 16.-Sunday
night during a' revival sermon at
Macey, Ind., William E. Dollar was
among the repentants.
Monday night Dollar murdered his
mother and daughter, drowned his
son and 17-months-old daughter, and
then rushed to a nearby cemetery and
shot himself,, falling dead over the
newly made grave of his young wife.
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* NEED 50 MORE MEN FOR*
* OBSTACLE RELAY RACES *
* __ _*
* Not half of the required num- *
* ber of men have turned out at "
* Ferry field. Tryouts will be *
* held again today from 3:30 to *
* 6:00 o'clock. Get the under- *
* classmen to come out! *
* The full quota for the tug-of- *
* war teams has been secured. *
* Let's fill up the relay teams to- *
* day! *
* *
* ~* * * * * * * * * * *

SENIORS 14010 ANNUAL
SWiIJG-0UTON CAMPUS
Classes Cather on Walks; Presi-
dent Hutchins Delivers Address
hi University Hall
Under lowering skies, with just
enough spatters of rain to make the
weather a- matter of comment, 1300
seniors, garbed in academic robes,
marched in solemn procession along
the legs of the campus block "M" yes-
terday afternoon, thus fulfillingMMichi-
gan tradition another year.
The classes gathered in groups on
the campus walks shortly after 4:00
o'clock. At 4:15 o'clock the senior
lits filed into University hall, followed
by the other senior classes. An or-
chestra placed in the balcony played
a march until all had reached their
places and President Hutchins, accom-
panied by Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, had
come upon the stage, when at a given
signal all were seated.
Rev. Douglas offered the invocation.
Chase B. Sikes, '16, then rendered a
solo, which was followed by an ad-
dress 1iy President Hutchins to the
seniors assembled.
After a brief discussion of the sig-
nificance of the event and the day,
the president proceeded to remind his
audience that their days of usefulness
had just begun and that the problems
which they would now confront were
entirely new ones. "Hitherto," he
said, "you have had a daily task set
by your instructors, and you have en-
deavored, with more or less success, to
meet their requirements. As univer-
sity graduates, a great portion of your
lifework will consist in the handling
of men. You must be able to meet
folks, to understand folks. Above all,
(Continued on 'age Six)

WOLVERINES LOSE
TO SYRACUSETEAM
IN SECOND GAME
ORANGEMEN SCORE 9 RUNS TO 4
FOR VARSITY; HURLERS
HIT FREELY
ANDRUS TWIRLS FOR MICHIGAN
Visitors('on tinueBatting Streak;
Secure Teni Safeties Off
Turnure
Syracuse, N. Y., May 16.-Michigan
lost to Syracuse today, 9 to 4, in a
game featured by a little dab of every
kind of ball playing. Both pitchers
were hit hard all the way through the
struggle.
Syracuse started the attack in the
second inning, when Wilbur walked
and Welch doubled to deep center.
Andrus then went through a peculiar
motion which the umpire called a
balk and both runners advanced a
base, scoring Wilbur. Rafter was hit
and both he and Welch scored on an
error by Caswell, who attempted to
put out a bunt to Andrus. Ahearn
stole second, took third on a wild
(Continued on Page Six)
NOTICE SERVIED ON
NEUTRAL IPOWERS

M ITARY TRAINING MAY
GIVE ENGINEERS CREDIT
Faculty Petitions Regents to Count
Summer Work at Camps To-
ivard Graduation
Another step in the development of
military training for the students of
the university was taken Monday when
the engineering faculty petitioned the
Board of Regents to allow students
of the College of Engineering to re-
ceive credit for work done in the gov-
ernment military instruction camps
during the summer.
The action was taken in response to
a Senate Council resolution of March'
14, expressing the desire of the coun-
cil that encouragement be given to
participation by students in the sum-
mer military camps conducted by the
federal government.
After the meeting of the senate
council, Dean M. E. Cooley appointed
a committee of five, consisting of Prof.
L. M. Gram, chairman, Prof. F. R.
Finch, Prof. H. J. Goulding, Prof. J.
H. Rowen, and Mr. C. E. Wilson, to
consider the matter. Monday the fol-
lowing resolution was adopted and
sent to the Board of Regents:
"That students of the University,
now regularly enrolled in the College
of Engineering, who shall present a
government certificate that they have
satisfactorily completed the prescribed
course of military training, requiring
a five weeks' period during the sum-
mer of 1916, shall receive two hours
of credit toward graduation, with an
additional hour to those who shall be
formally reported to have Qualified
on or before October 1, 1916, as ex-
pert riflemen."
The Plattsburg sumu,cr camp is a
model of the training camps at winch
the students will receive instruction
in military science. The Board of Re-
gents meets Friday, and will consider
the petition at that time. This action
is in the nature of an experiment and
will only relate to the coming summer.
What action will be taken in the fu-
ture should the regents fav(Ar the
movement, depends upon the results
of this summer's work.
FRESHMEN TO HOLD
PEP MEETTONIGHT
Will Gather In West Physics Lecture
Hall at 7:00 o'Clock to
Hear Talks

AMERICAN TROOPS RETIRING NORTH
WHILE CgARRANZA FORCES TAKE UP
REGION USED. FOR SCOUTING VILI

I

NITIAL FESTIVAL
CONCERT TONIGHTI

Germany Adds New Phase to
marine Warfare; Effect
Not Known

Sub-

Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frieda Hempel to Appear
This Evening

and

BOTH HAVE BEEN HERE BEFORE
It has always been the endeavor of
the management in the past to make
the opening concert of the May Festi-
val series one of unusual interest and
brilliance, and the concert which will
be given in Hill auditorium tonight by
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and
Frieda Hempel, soprano soloist, will
surely prove no exception.
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
needs no introduction to Ann Arbor
audiences, as it has appeared here
upon several occasions, and the satis-
factory work of this splendid organiza-
tion is well known and appreciated.
Miss Hempel is not altogether a
stranger here either, as she made her
first appearance in this city at the
festival last year, at which time she
received an enthusiastic reception.
This talented young singer was born
in Leipsic and made her debut as an
operatic singer at the Berlin Royal
Opera house, where she remained five
years. At the end of this time the
Kaiser was so much interested in her

FEENCH STOP INFAN TRY ATTACK
Washington, May 16.-Germany has
served notice on neutral nations, in-
cluding the United States, that mer-
chantmen which turn their prows to-,
ward her submarines may be sunk
on sight. Whether this notice lessens
the scope of the assurances which the
Berlin government gave to the United
States some days ago will be deter-
mined after careful consideration by
the President and Secretary Lansing.
The instructions to German com-
manders which gave effect to the as-
surances provided that in accordance
with the general principles of visit
and search and the destruction of mer-
chant vessels recognized by interna-
tional law such vessels should not be
sunk without warning and without
saving the human lives unless they
attempted to escape or offered resist-
ance. There was no suggestion in the
instrucfions that the provision of the
ship at the time of being overhauled
would limit the obligation of the sub-
marine commander.
The German ambassador today told
Secretary Lansing that his govern-
ment desires to suggest to neutral gov-
ernments that the masters of their
merchant ships be given to understand
that in the event of their being stopped
by German warships the provisions of
international law must be observed
and that their special attention be
drawn to the danger of turning their
vessels toward submarines.
Paris, May 16.-After a protracted
bombardment of the French line, the
Germans made an infantry attack to-
day to the west of Hill 304. The at-
tack was stopped by, the French fire
curtain. The artillery combat in this
region continues.
An attempt by a German detachment
to deliver a surprise attack against the
French advanced positions in the re-
gion of Butte Buneiul in Champagne,
where .several small general attacks
were made yesterday, was checked by
the French with hand grenades.
Last night the Germans made a
small attack to the northwest of
Thiaumont Farm, southwest of Douau-
mont village. On the east bank of the
Meuse this was completely repulsed.
LAY CORNERSTONE FOR NEW 'Y'

* * * * * * * * *. * * * *
* *
* WHERE TO OBTAIN FERRY *
* FIELD PETITION BLANKS *
* __ _*
* Board of Regents petition *
* blanks for Sunday afternoon *
* exercise on Ferry field have '
*been posted at the following *
* places for the convenience of *
* those who wish to sign: *
Hustons', Michigan Union, *
* Busy Bee, Calkins' drug store, *
* South University Inn, the Delta *1
* Cafe, Cushing's drug store, and *<
* the East University pharmacy. *
* *
*.** * * * * * *
Casement Trial
Causes Interest,
Sir Rodger Shows Signs of Extreme
Nervousness During
Proceedings
London, May 16.-Dramatic inci-i
dents followed one another in rapid1
succession during the trial of Sir Rod-1
ger Casement and Daniell Bailey inI
the Bow Street police court on thef
charge of high treason. In point of}
pathos the second day of the trialI
even surpassed the first.-
Sir Rodger at one stage of the pro-e
ceedings was completely abandoned<
by his usual unconcerned air, and he
broke into convulsions and sobs.
Throughout the hearing he showedc
signs of extreme nervousness. Pub-
lic interest has increased rather than
diminished. Such notables as Sir Ar-
thur Wing Pinero, Lord Murfey, andT
others were prominent at the trial.
Step by step the prosecution today1
traced Casement's movements from
the time he landed until he was de-
livered at the Tower of London. Two
children figured prominently in theE
day's proceedings; one, a seven-year-
old girl into whose hands fate placed
three of the 7,000 weapons that had1
been destined to free Ireland; thet
other a 12-year-old boy who, on thec
witness stand, identified Casement<
and whose childlike manner added a
touch of humor to the hearing and1
elicited a cheerful laugh from the
prisoner.
-The father of the girl, a farmer
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity-Fair and warm.
TODA
11:00 o'clock-Meeting of fresh en-
gineers to elect spring contests cap-
tains, 348 Engineering building.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of soph lits
to nominate a student councilman, and
to elect spring contests captains, 101
Economics building.
4:00oclock-Meeting of soph en-
gineers to elect spring contests cap-
tains, 348 Engineering building.
4:00 o'clock-Junior architect class
meeting, 312 Eng.
4:00 o'clock-Soph engineer special
class meeting, 348 Eng.
4:00 o'oock-The combined fresh
homeop, dent, pharmic, and architect
classes meet to elect captain- of first
relay team, room 303, Chemistry build-
ing.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of fresh lit
class to elect three captains for spring
events, room 203, Tappan hall. ,
4:30 o'clock-The combined soph
homeop, dent, pharmic and architect
classes meet to elect captain of the
first relay teams, room 303, Chemistry
building.
7:15 o'clock-Meeting of Soph Prom
committee, Union.
8:00 o'clock-Frieda Hempel in
first concert of the May Festival, Hill
auditorium.

RRS. JESSE DEEMER ON WAY T4
BIU BEND TO AVENGE CAP-
TURE OF HER HUSBAND
ARIZONA ASKS PROTECTIO
x500 Defenseless Men and Women o
the Border; Create Motor.-
eye' eCorps
El Paso, May 16.-American troops
were succeeded at San Antonio toda:
by forces of the Carranza army, ac
cording to official announcements o
General Gaviera, commander of the
Carranzista garrison at Juarez. Gen
eral Gaviera announced that the
American troops were retiring nortl
and that his forces were replacing
them throughout the region ove
which the Americans have been scout
after the band of Villistas
Trevino in Command in Chihuahua
"General Trevino is moving nort
from Torreon," said General Gaviera
"with the last force of men to be use
in establishing protection of you:
border in order that there will no
be further raids. General Trevin
will, be in command of the military
forces of the entire state of Chihua-
hua. Our forces have already occu-
pied San Antonio, recently evacuate
by the American troops, and we wil
extend our lines to Namiquipa. I under
stand General Pershing will fall bacl
to Colonia Dublan as soon as sufficien
Carranza troops arrive to occupy thi
city."
Kidnapped Men Unheard of
Traveling by automobile, Mrs. Jess
Deemer arrived in El Paso today fron
Los Angeles, on her way to the Big
Bend country to find and avenge the
capture of her husband, the Boquilla:
merchant, who was robbed and kid
naped by Mexican bandits. Mrs. Deem
er is accompanied by her son, Dick
son Deemer, aged 26. She says she
will directly to the scene of her hus
band's capture and will employ scout:
to trail the movements of the Mexi
can bandits from that point into Mexi
co. The fate of Deemer and Monro
Payne is still unknown, nor has ther
been any word of John Woodson and
F. Valiworth since their disappear
ance from the vicinity of Boquillas
day or two before the raid.
ARIZONA WANTS PROTECTION
Washington, D. C., May 16-A tele
gram was received today by Senator HI
F. Ashurst of Arizona, appealing fo
troops to guard the 200-mile stretc
from Nogales to Yuma. The messag
insisted that the calling out of th
Arizona national guard for . servic
with the federal forces has left 2,50
defenseless men and women livin
along the Arizona border at the merc
of the Mexican outlaws. A copy c
the telegram was sent by Senato
Ashurst to Secretary of War Bake
who directed that it be forwarded t
Major-General Funston for whateve
action the latter could take.
Personal Appeal to Funston Ignore
The telegram, which was from th
chamber of commerce of Tuscon, Ar;
zona, complained that General Fur
ston himself had ignored a similar ai
peal made direct to him. Precedin
the difficulty of attempting to patr
the entire border effectively. with thi
limited number of troops at his di
posal, General Funston has recon
mended to the war department th
creation of a corps of forty-eight m
torcycle scouts who, with the facilit
for covering the ground. quickly, as t
general points out in his recommend:
tion, will enable the officers along th
border to keep in more constant touc
with isolated sections along the i
ternational boundary. Secretry Ba
er has approved the recommendatic
and the macllines will be assembled
once.
GRIFFINS TAKE IN THIRTEE

FINISH

TUG-OF-WAR WEIGHINGI

FREIDA HEMPEL
Soloist in the First Con-
cert of the May Festival
a Hill Auditorium To-
night
beautiful voice and splendid art that
he personally requested that she be
released from her contract and return
to Berlin. It was by special per-
mission of the German emperor that
she came to America. She made her
debut at the Metropolitan Opera house,
New York, in January, 1913, and in
an incredibly short time had firmly
established herself in the high regard
of metropolitan opera goers. Since,
that time she has taken the leading so-
prano roles in numerous operas in
which her work has shown that she
is an artist of the first rank.
This evening Miss Hempel will sing
three well known arias, "Il Re Pas-
tore," by Mozart; "Caro Nome," (Rigo-
letto), by Verdi, and the Mad Scene
from "Lucia di Lammermoqr," by
Donizetti.
Expect W. H. Tinker to Return Today
Mr. W. H. Tinker, secretary of the
S. C. A., is expected to return to Ann
Arbor today. He has been attending
a .Y. M. C. A. conference at Cleveland,-
Ohio.,

Lots of dormant class spirit threat-
ens to break forth when the freshmen
meet for their "pep" session in West
Physics hall at 7:00 o'clock tonight.
The enthusiasm which has been
pent up all winter will be let loose
at the hands of Staatz M. Abrams,
'17E, and Werner W. Schroeder, '16L,
who will be the pep-instillers for the
meeting of the first year men. Every
man in the 1919 classes is expected
to be on hand when the doors are
thrown open shortly before 7:00
o'clock.
An extension or time for the relay
ebstacle race tryouts was granted last
night by Chairman Francis T. Mack,
' 6E, when it was found that but 30
freshmen and 16 sophomores had
turned out. Forty-eight men from
each class are needed and tryouts for
the event will be continued at Ferry
field today from 3:30 to 6:00 o'clock.
It is hoped that the lists will be com-
plete after today's tryouts.
Weighing-in for the tug-of-war was
concluded at the gym yesterday, the
full quota being secured for each team.
The complete list of men who will pull
on the big rope Friday afternoon will
be published in Thursday's issue of
The Daily.
Class meetings for the election of a
captain for the first relay team will
be _:ild by the fresh dents, pharmics,
architects, and homeops in room 03.
Chemistry building, tt 4 00 o'clock to-
day. Sophomores of the same depart-
ments will meet to elect their captain
for the same event at 4:30 o'clock
in the same room.
Meetings for the other classes to
elect captains for the spring contests
will be held today, as announced in
yesterday's Daily. Notice of the time
and place of the meetings is to. be
found in the Events of Today column
on this page.
Runners in the tug-of-war obstacle
race will each run an eighth of a
mile, during which they will climb
over fences and jump through bar-
rels, carrying at the same time the
pennant of their class on a pole.
Austrians Capture Italian Positions
- Berlin, May 16.-Italian first line
positions in several sectors have been
captured by the Austrians after con-
centrated artillery preparation, it was
announced in today's Austro-Hunga-
rian headquarters' report issued in
Vienna. The Austrians took more
than, 2,500 prisoners, seven cannon,
and 11 machine guns in these opera-
tions.

Expect Building to Be Finished
Opening .of Fall Term

by

The cornerstone of the new Univer-
sity Y. M. C. A. building was formally
laid yesterday afternoon. There was'
no ceremony, although Judge V. H.
Lane, president of the board of trus-
tees of the S. C. A., and several other
members of the board were present
at the sealing of the corner tablet.
In a cavity inside the large stone
was placed an air-tight lead box, con-
taining a quantity of contemporary in-
formation relating to the affairs of the
Y. M. C. A. and the university. In the
box is a list containing about ,3500
names of persons who donated money
to the building, and current copies of
campus lublications.
The completion of the building is
set by the contract for November 1,
but it is expected that it will be fin-
ished by October 1, in time for the
opening of the fall term.

All-Campus Honorary Society Ho
TOMORROW Spring Initiation
Morning, afternoon and evening, en-
gineering exhibit. Thirteen new members were tal
8:00 o'clock-May Festival ocncert, into Griffins, all-campus honorary u
Hill auditorium. perclass soci'ty, yesterday. After
campus initiation at the flagpole,
U-NOTICES initiates were tendered a banquet
Fresh and sophomore foresters are the Renellen Hospice. G. C. Car
requested to see Easterbrook, room F- '17L, acted as toastmaster, and spee
317, Natural Science building, 2:30 es were made by G. M. Coldter, '1
to 5:30 o'clock today. L. C. Reimann, '16, Dr. H. S. Hulbe
Senior lit baseball practice, Thurs- R. W. Collins, '17E, and W. C. MV,
day. 3:30 o'clock, south Ferry 'field. lendore, '16L.
First round of campus golf tourna- The initiates are: R W . Collins, '1
ment, played off today and tomorrow. R. E. 'Fol, '17, A. J. Gornetzky, '
Results must be in by Saturday night. A. S. Hart, '17; R. L. MeNomee, '1
Band rehearsal at. 7:00 o'clock in. J. F. Meade, '17E, T. C. Reid, '17, J
University hall. Robbins, '17E, A. A. Schupp, '1
Today is the last day that senior en- H. A. Taylor, '17E, J. W. Thomas,
gineers will be able to buy their se- L. S. Thompson, '18, and H.
nior canes. White, '17.

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