100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 16, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICRI.GAN DAILY

To Seniors
From New York Alumni

MICHIGAN'S MAY '
FESTIVAL STARTSj
TOMORROW NIGHT1

r.

We can help you socially, to
find a suitable home, and in
/business, if you will make
' yourself known to us prompt-
ly on arrival in New York.
If you will seek a position,
bring a University reference.
Q~~io f MClubot UY
Pres.: C. A. Riegelman,'99
44 Cedar St., Tel. John 972
Sec'y: E. E. A. Stone, '12
81 Fulton St., Tel. Beekman, 4252

SCIENCE COURSES
PLAN FOR EXHiBIT
Zoology, Geology and Botany Depart-
ments Unite in Displaying Features
in New Science Building
FACULTY MEMBERS TO LECTURE
Not among the least attractive of
the departmental exhibits to be given
in connection with the Engineering ex-
hibit May 18 and 19 will be those
given by the zoology, geology and bot-
any departments. Through enthusias-
tie and conscientious effort by the
faculty and student body of these de-
partments, excellent results have
been obtained.
In room Z-154 of the New Science
building, the department of zoology
will install its aquarium. Large ce-
ment tanks and smaller aquaria will
be used to show methods of keeping
alive fish, crayfish, turtles, salaman-
ders, frogs, toads, muskrats, etc. In
the zoological shop in room Z-159 will
be electrically driven lathes, drill
presses, and other apparatus used by
students and investigators.
A representative collection of ani-
mal parasites will be demonstrated un-
der microscopes in room 231. Typi-
cal Michigan vertebrates will be on
display in room 346, while the ento-
mological exhibit will occupy room 348.
Three rooms of the New Science
building will be used by the geology
department. The preparation room,
where the skeletons of prehistoric ani-
mals will be shown, is to be on the
first floor. Room 332 will show some
interesting specimens of the geology
collection.
A collection of views illustrative of
geological features and particularly
two large panoramic views of the
Grand Canyon of the Colorado and the
Baltoro Glacier in the Himalaya moun-
tains, will be on view in the corridor
of the second floor.
A number of lectures will be given
by members of the faculty in the au-
ditorium of the building. The list of
speakers and their subjects will be
announced later.
Prof. H. A. Gleason will have charge
og the botany exhibit. Room B-100
will house the exhibit of the physio-
logical laboratory. Here a number of
experiments will be set up for inspec-
tion by the visitors. The new green
house is also to be in readiness for
inspection.
The microscopic study of the vas-
cular plants and the microtechnique
of woods will be featured by Prof. W.
W. Tupper on the third floor. Many
modern instruments, such as micro-
tomes, air pumps, electric baths, and
photomicographs will be shown. In
room 313 will be the plant ecology
and morphology exhibits.
A collection illustrating the eco-
nomic fungus diseases of field and
forest plants will be shown in room
B-400. Owing to the difficulty of ob-
taining laboratory equipment, the de-
partment will be unable to show some
of its most valuable museum material.
'TED' MEREDITH BREAKS RECORD
Penn Runner Runs Half-Mile in
1:52 14 Saturday
Philadelphia, May 15.-J. E. "Ted"
Meredith, the marvelous Pennsylvania
middle distance runner, smashed the
world's half-mile record in the dual
meet between Cornell and Pennsyl-
vania on Franklin field Saturday after-

noon in one of the most sensational
races seen on the Quaker track in
some time.
The Red and. Blue flyer stepped the
distance in 1 minute 52 1-5 seconds,
displacing the old record of 1 minute
52 1-2 seconds, which Meredith himself
made at the Olympic games in Stock-
holm in 1912.
Routine Business Conducted by Board
Nothing but routine business was
carried on at the meeting of the ad-

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA1
TO ( ARRIVE WEDNESDAY t
MORNINGI
FRIEDA HEMPLE SINGS FIRSTt
Vocnl Numbers by Metropolitan Opera
Star Aided by Music
of Artists
Tomorrow evening will mark the
beginning of the twenty-th ird annualr
May Festival which is not only the
culmination of the musical activities
of the year in Ann Arbor, but is one
of the largest and finest festivals in
this part of the country.
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra,
many members of which have become
citizens of Ann Arbor, will arrive
from Oberlin, Ohio, tomorrow morn-
ing. At the same time several of the
soloists will put in an appearance,
while musicians and music lovers
from all parts of the state will begin
to descend upon the University City.
Great interest is centered in the
opening concert, which will consist of
several orchestral numbers inter-
spersed by vocal numbers sung by
Frieda Hempel, the coloratura so-
prano of the Metropolitan Opera com-
pany, who during her four-years' re-
gime with that august body has at-
tained a foremost position, and whose
art is so superior, and whose person-
ality so pleasing that her appearances
there are always features of the Met-
ropolitan Opera season. Unlike many
operatic stars whose success is made
possible largely through a scenic back-
ground and the support of associate
artists, she possesses the charm of a
successful festival singer.
Miss Hempel has been heard in sev-
eral of the leading festivals and al-
ways with the same enthusiasm. The
numbers which she will present at
Ann Arbor have been selected with
great care from her extensive reper-
toire.
The first festival concert promises to
eclipse any of the opening nights
which have taken place in the past
in variety, brilliance and solidity.
SENIORS APPEAR TODAY IN
ANNUAL CLASS SWING-OUT
(Continued from Page One)
between University hall and the An-
gell residence; medics on the walk
between University hall and the flag
pole; laws between the flag pole and
the chemistry building; pharmics on
the walk in front of the cannon; ho-
meops at the north entrance of th
economics building; and dents at tht
south entrance of the same building.
From the above positions the classes
will march into University hall, the
senior lits leading, followed by the
engineers, architects, medics, laws
pharmics, homeops, and dents, in the
order named. When the hall is
reached the members of the classe
will remain standing until all are as-
sembled and the signal is given.
The exercises will begin at 4:30
o'clock. After the invocation by Re
Lloyd C. Douglas, of the Congrega-
tional church, Chase B. Sikes, '16, will
sing a solo. President Harry B
Hutchins will then deliver a short ad
dress to the seniors. The benedictio
will be given by Rev. Douglas.
At the close of the exercises, the
classes \vill rise and march out of
the hall in the order in which they
entered, the senior lits leading. Pro-
ceeding from the main entrance of
University hall to State street, thence
south to Memorial hall, the following
route will be taken, forming a block
"M": East on South University to
the engineering building, through the

engineering arch and along the di-
agonal walk to the flag pole, turn
and march along walk to gymnasiums,
west on North University to the law
building. At the law building th,
line will break up into classes and
occupy bleachers where pictures of
each group will be taken.
Owing to the fact that rehearsals
for the May Festival are occupyinm
the attention of all the musically in-
clined, the traditional senior sings
have been postponed until next week.
The complete programs will be an-
nounced later.
After today, until the end of the se-
meste;, seniors will wear their aca-
demic robes two lays each week, on
Wednesday and Friday.
The committee on arrangements an-
nounced last night that in case of rain
during the late afternoon the exer-
cises and the subsequent march will
be postponed.
Call Lyndon for a good flashlight.

ELECT TEEGARDEN PRESIDENT
Lisle, Adams and Bogue Also Win in
Oratorical Association Elections
The following officers of the Ora-
torical association for next year were
elected Saturday:
President, H. B. Teegarden, '17; vice
president, L. W. Lisle, '17L; secre-
tary, W. T. Adams, '17; treasurer, A.
P. Bogue, '18L.
The financial manager and contest
manager, the two new offices provided
for in the recently adopted constitu-
tion, will be appointed from the facul-
ty in the near future.

:I

*

AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Majestic -'Tyrone Power in
"John Needham's Double."
Arcade-Adele Brood in "The
D)evil's Toy."
Orpheum - Lillian Gish in
"Daphne and the Pirate."
*** * * * * * * * *

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
E*
*
*"

Glenn Coulter, '16, Says Copies Over
Subscription List Will Go

WOLVERINES LOSE TO SYRA-
CTSE IN HIARR) GAME,

7,-51

(Continued from Page One)
scoring Captain Labadie from first.
He himself came home a minute later
on a single by Caswell.
In the fifth, Dunne beat out a per-
fect bunt along the first base line.
Newell sacrificed him to second, from
where he scored on Robins' drive to
center, tying the score. Immediately
the Orangemen started a slugging fest.
A single, a double and a triple con-
secutively, netted them two more runs
in the last half of the fifth.
Brandell got a walk in the sixth,
stole second, and scored on Caswell's
double to left. In the seventh Michi-
gan tied the score again when Dunne
doubled, took third on the relay from
the outfield to that sack, and scored
on Morgan's wild heave to hold him
there, making one complete and con-
tinuous circuit.
In the last of the eighth Robins
walked two men and then hit a man,
filling the bases. Slater, the Syracuse
twirler, slammed the ball to center
field for a double, scoring two runs
ahead of him. Thomas threw the
next man out at the plate.
The Wolverines played a fast, dash-
ing game, and appeared to have re-
turned to old time hitting strength.
They touched Slater hardest in the
fourth, driving several directly at the
fielders. Turnure and Miller will
probably be the opposing pitchers in

tomorrow's game.
Box score:
Michigan- AB
Niemann, rf........ 4
Walterhouse, ss .... 4
Labadie, if ......... 4
Brandell, cf........ 3
Caswell, 2b.........4
Thomas, 3b .........4

. R. H. P0. A. E.

0
0
1
2
0
0
2
0
0
0

0
1
1
1
2
0
2
0
1
0

0
2
0
0
2
3
1
0
2
0

Dunne, c ...........4
Newell, lb.......... 2
Robins, p .......... 3
Roehnm.............1

E

Totals .........33 5
Syracuse- AB. R.

8 24 10
H. PO. A.

0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
2
E.
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1

Rafter, cf ..........
Ahearn, ss .........
Meehan, 2b.......
Hamilton, lb .... . .
Travis, rf ..........
Morgan, c........
Wilbur, 3b .........
Welch, If ..........
Slater, p ...........
Totals .. ... ...
Summaries:
Michigan.... ...0
Syracuse.......3 C

1 0
2 1
2 1
0 1
0 1
1 '1
1 0
0 0
0 1

2
2
5
7
2
6.
2
0
1

0
3
1
1
1
1
2
0
2

31 7 6 27 11 4
1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0-5
) 0 0 2 0 0 2 x-7

Two base hits-Ahearn, Caswell,
Dunn, Slater. Three base hits-Mor-
gan, Brandell, Hamilton. Sacrifice hit
-Newell. Hits-Off Robins, 6; off
Slater, 8. Stolen bases-Meehan, Mor-
gan, Brandell, Caswell. Struck out-
By Robins, 4; by Slater, 7. Bases on
balls-Off Robins, 5; off Slater, 1. Hit
by pitched ball-By Robins, Hamilton
and Welch. Time of game-Two hours.
Umpire-Dr. Flynn.
FOURTEEN DIE IN EXPLOSION
AT DUPONT POWDER CO. PLANT
Gibbstown, N. J., May 15.-Fourteen
men were believed to have been killed
and about 30 injured today in a ter-
rific explosion at the Repanuo plant
at the DuPont Powder company near
hare. The blast occurred in the build-
ing in which trinitrololuol is manufac-
tured and wrecked that structure and
three others. Among the identified
dead are W. F. Lawley, of Woodbury,
N. J., assistant superintendent of the
plant, and George Marsh of Pauls-
boro, N. J., foreman.

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan