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May 16, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-16

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Y'T1E DAILY
0Qc
NINEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS
VOL XXVLT. 1o. 158.

IGAN n

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY T
NEW YORK SUN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 16, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

SENIORS APPEAR
TODAYf IN ANuA
VARIOUS CLASSES ASSEMBLE ON
CAMPUS AT 4:05 O'CLOCK T1!
FORM ORDER OF MARCH
HOLD EXERCISES IN U HALL
Swing-out Parade to Start at 5:04)
o'Clock; Wear Caps and Gowns
Each Wednesday and Friday
Promptly at 5:00 o'clock this after-
noon, the senior classes of the com-
bined schools and colleges of the uni-
versity will begin their annual Swing-
out about the campus. Approximately
1300 seniors will be in line.
Previous to the parade, Swing-out
exercises will be held in University
hall. According to arrangements
completed by the committee last
night the senior classes will assemble
on the campus walks at 4:05 o'clock
in the following stations: Literary
seniors on the walk between the mu-
seum and University hall; engineers
and architects on the diagonal walk
(Continued on Page Four)
STU DENTS A9GAI NST
AROUSING STATE
Favor Opening of Ferry Field as Ad-
vantageous to Campus, but Fear It
Would Arouse Disfavor
WOULD REPLACE RIVER TRIPS
"Don't do anything that would arouse
the people of the state"
Such was the universal statement;
of prominent students when inter-
viewed concerning the proposed open-
ing of Ferry field on Sundays.
From the point of view of the effect
on the student body at large, the
leaders in campus thought expressed
the belief that the, contemplated action
would do "a world of good." The one
objection expressed by all was the
fear that the people of the state would
be up in arms if the athletic grounds
should be thrown, open on Sunday.
"The only objection I can see is
that it would probably keep some stu-
dents from attending church. How-
ever, I don't believe that this objec-
.tion should be considered seriously, for
the men who attend services wouldn't
Ise the grounds anyway, and those
who feel like indulging in athletics on
Sunday don't go to church. I believe
that the majority of the students would
be in favor of. the action. In my opin-
ion it would highly beneficial. The
people of the state would no doubt ob-
ject strenuously." - Werner W.
Schroeder, '1Ia
"I am very much in favor of open-
ing Ferry field on Sunday. I believe
it would be much better for the stu-
dents to exercise on Ferry field than
to take trips up the river, The grounds
are far enough away to eliminate any
disturbing element, The only real
objection I see is that a great number
of people throughout the state would
not relish the idea."-henry C, Rum-
mell, '16L.
"I like the idea of throwing open
(Continued on Page Six)

)Ixle-Kentucky Club Tickets on Sale
All members of the Dixie club, Ken-
tucky club and The Cabinet, are urg-
ed to get their tickets immediately for
the Spring Dance to be held next Sat-
urday evening at the 'Country club.
Non-members may obtain a limited
number of tickets that 'are not sold
after next Wednesday. The music will
be one of the features, four of the best
campus entertainers having been ob-
tained.

show Working of
Miniature Plant
Engineering Exhibit Will Show Pow-
er House Illustrating Method in
Use in Western United States
A mountain stream which is held in
cheek by a darn, and a power house
which develops power from the pond-
ed water, will be shown in connection
with the hydraulic exhibition of the
engineering exhibit which is to be
hold Thursday and Friday of this week.
The model, which measures 15 feet
by four feet and three feet deep, is built
to show a mountain stream rushing
down the precipitous slopes of the
hilly country. As the stream approach-
es the lowlands of the model it is held
in check by a high masonry dam. Part
of the water is drawn off through typi-
cal structures to supply power to a
model power house. The water flows
through a miniature turbine, designed
by Prof. S. J. Zowslk, and then returns
to the stream. ,
The small amount of power which
is developed is used for a number of
purposes. Part of it is conveyed by
means of a high tension transmission
line back into the hills where coal
mining operations are going on. Part
of it is used to illuminate the plant
with miniature lights, and part of it
is used to electrify a miniature rail-
road which runs around the entire
model and tunnels through one of the
higher mountains.
The entire model is a duplicate of
such a power development project as
is seen in the western part of the
United States and is a striking illus-
tration of nmodern power.
Negro Lynched for Murder in Waco
Waco, Texas, May 15.-Jesse Wash-
ington, eighteen-year-old negro on
trial for murder, was taken from the
officers and publicly burned in front
of the city hall here this morning be-
fore a crowd of 10,000 men, women
and children.
HOMEOP SOCIETY OPENS
THREE DAY CONVENTION

WOLERINES LOSE
TO SYRACUSE IN
HHRDGAME, 7-5
SLATER OF THE ORANGEMEN WINS
OWN GAME WITH DOUBLE
IN EIGHTh
MICHIGAN OUTHITS OPPONENTS
Robins has Trouble Caused by Wild-
ness, but Wolverines Play Snap-
l)y Game Throughout
Syracuse, N. Y., May 15.-Syracuse
defeated Michigan today after a hard
fought battle by a 7-5 score. Slater,
the Orange pitcher, won his own game
in the last of the eighth inning when
he clouted the ball for two sacks,
driving in two runs.
Robins, for Michigan, started off by
walking two men and making an er-
ror, thus placing three men on bases.
Morgan then proceeded to slash out
a triple, clearing the bases and net-
ting three runs for his team.
Slater held the Wolverines down un-
til the fourth inning when Brandell
slammed out a triple to deep center,
(Continued on Page Four)
NEED MANY MEN
FOR RELAY RACES
Classes Will Elect Captains According
to Rotation of Office Plan
Tomorrow
PEP MEETINGS IN PHYSICS HALL
"We need 87 men for the obstacle
relay races."
Such was the warning given out
yesterday by Chairman Francis T.
Mack, '16E, who has charge of the
spring contests this week-end. "But
nine men have turned out for the re-
lays," said Mack yesterday at the con-
clusion of the tryouts, "and with 96
places to fill on the three teams.
"I fear that we are going to have
as much trouble as the Student Coun-
cil did last year in getting the men out
for the event. Today will be the last
day for the try-outs if the men need-
ed show up. I urge every loyal under-
classman to come down to Ferry field
this afternoon between 3:30 o'clock
and 6:00 o'clock and do his duty to
his class."
"Weighing In" at Gym Today
More men are needed for the three
tug-of-war teams, and for this pur-
pose "weighing in" will be continued
at Waterman gym this afternoon from
2:00 o'clock to 3:30 o'clock.
Because the new Natural Science au-
ditorium will not be available, the two
big "pep" sessions, that of the fresh
tomorrow night and of the sophs on
Thursday, will be held in West Physics
hall, where they have been held in
the past. Every man in the two un-
(Continued on Page Six)
ELEVEN KILLED AT AKRON WHEN
CROWD)ED BUILDING COLLAPSES
Akron. Ohio, May 15.-Eight identi-
fied dead, three unidentified, three
missing, and. at least a score of in-
jured was the toll when the victims
were caught in a death trap here to-
night under the crumbling walls of the

,Crystal restaurant as the building col-
lapsed. Rescuers are making desper-
ate efforts to uncover all of the de-
bris in the belief that others are still
buried in the ruins. The crash came
at 6:10 o'clock tonight when the res-
taurant was crowded. So suddenly
did the building cave in and the walls
crumble that those who were not in-
stantly killed were rendered uncon-
scious.

Second' Issue of
Inlander Appears
Number Is Increased to 40 Pages;
300 Additional Copies to
le Put Out
On account of a large printing con-
tract, the May number of the Inlander
has suffered a slight delay, but will
appear upon the campus for sale at
3:00 o'clock today.
Stories, poems, editorials -and ar-
ties by members of the faculty are,
said to make this one of the most in-
teresting magazines ever published
upon the Michigan campus. Not only
have the best literary products avail-
able been selected for publication, but
the articles of a more serious nature
are said to possess vitag interest,
treating topics of the greatest import-
ance to the student body. The num-
ber has been increased to 40 pages,
300 more copies of which will be
printed than was printed for the April
number.
An announcement was made last
night to the effect that Philip P. Weis-
berg, '17, has been appointed to the
position of assistant to the business
manager.
* ,* * * * * * * * * * * *
UNIIEJICLASSMEN *
Don't forget the big mass *
* meetings: Freshmenmeet to- *
* morrow, sophs Thursday, in *
West Physics hall. Four of the *
*best campus speakers will be *
*there to instill lots of that Michi-*
*gan "pep"
* In the meanwhile, wear your *
' fresh caps-there are only a *
* few more days before soph- *
* hood. *
* TRADITIONS COMMITTEE, *
* Student Council. *
* *
DAILY BESTS CARGOYLE
IN DIAMORD CONTEST

BRIDGES ALONG SO
RAILROAD PUT UNI
TO MEX11IN ATTI
A I '! .i. * * * * * * * *
**
LAST CHANCE TO ENTER *
TUG-OF-WAR AND RELAYS *
Many men are needed for the h
obstacle relay races. Tryouts *
at Ferry field from 3:30 to 6:00 *
* o'clock today. *
* Freshmen and sophomores,
* many of them, are needed for *
* the three tug-of-war teams. Re- *
* Dort at Waterman gym from *
* :00 to 3:30 o'clock today. *
THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE, *
UNDERCLASSMEN! *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
German and Russian Red Cross Break'
Stockholm, May 15.-According to
the Tagensnyheter, the international
Red Cross conference resulted in a
complete rupture between the German
and Russian Red Cross.

UTHERN PAGIFIG
EJER 'GUARDO'WING
A9CKS ON FORT BLISS
AMEllICANS IN BIG BEND REGION
FRilGHTENED 1,01L1VINI
. REC?NT MASSACRE

IWHAT'S GOING' ON

Weather forecast for Ann Arbor
vichnlty-Probable showers.

and

Scribes T'rounce Fun-Makers by
Score of 18 to 7; McKinney
Stars

a

Business Sessions

lDisecnssions,

Banquets on Program of
Meetings

The State Homeopathic society op-
ened its annual three-day convention
in this city yesterday with an all-day
clinic session led by Dr. Harlan Wells
of Philadelphia, one of the country's"
heart specialists. A smoker was ten-
dered the alumni by Dr. W. B. Hins-
dale in his private offices last night.
The first meeting will be an open
session this morning at which Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins will welcome
the members. In the afternoon there
will be a short business meeting fol-
lowed by papers by Dr. George P.
Meyers of Detroit, Dr. Theron G. Yeo-
mans of St. Joseph, and Dr. J. M. Lee
of Rochester, N. Y. At 6:00 o'clock
a banquet will be held in Barbour
gymnasium by the Homeopathic fac-
ulty, followed by an informal recep-
tion and dancing.
On Wednesday morning at 8:00
o'clock Dr. J. M. Lee will have charge
of the Gynecological clinic. A busi-
ness session will follow at which re-
ports of the various committees will
be read. The general session will in-
clude papers by Dr. H. G. Grover of
Jackson, Dr. Harlan Wells of Phila-
delphia, and Dr. G. Carl Voigt of Ann
Arbor. At the afternoon session, on
"Obstetrics" and "Eye and Ear" Dr.
A. B. Armsbury of Marine City, Dr.
Dean W. Myers of Ann Arbor, and Dr.
C. E. Beeman of Grand Rapids will
speak.
All the general sessions will be held
in the lower lecture room of the Ho-
meopathic hospital. Special attention
is called to the clinic to be held this
morning and tomorrow morning at
8:00 o'clock.

The annual battle between the staff
of The Michigan Daily and the Gar-
goyle, which was staged on Ferry
field at 3:30 o'clock yesterday after-
noon, resulted in an overwhelming
victory for The Daily by the score of
18 to 7.
The batteries for The Daily were
McKinney and Leonard; for the Gar-
goyle, John and McGuire. Not until
the end of the ninth inning, however,
were The Daily men confident of vic-
tory, every point being hotly contested
by the fun-makers. The traditional
umpire, the president of the Michigan
Union, Harry G. Gault, '17L, took his
position in centerfield acting on the
rumor- that the members of the teams
were expected to be rather "wild" in
their performances. Even there he
experienced difficulty in dodging the
bullets from two revolvers possessed
by two rival rooters, who thus under-
took to reverse his decisions.
McKinney, Leonard, Schermerhorn,
McDonald, Carey, Parker, Stadeker
and Rash contributed to the victory
secured by The Daily, while John,
McGuire, Fitzgerald, Heist and John-
son performed well for the Gargoyle.
"Our men played like veterans," re-
marked the perspiring editor of The
Daily immediately after the contest.
The Gargoyle men asserted that only
the neglect of their chief to provide
himself with tortoise-rimmed spec-
tacles and a green vest was the cause
of their defeat. This statement was
entirely unofficial. The score by in-
nings:

* TODA
3:00 o'clock-May number of the
Inlander out.
4:00 o'clock--Meeting of junior lits
for election of student councilman
room 101 Economids building.
4:05 o'clock-Assembly of classes
for the Swing-Out.
4:30 'clock-"-President Hutchins
addresses the seniors, U-hall. -
5:00 o'clock-Swing-Out.
7:15 o'clock--Meeting or the Zoolo-
gical Journal Club, room Z, 231, Na-
tural Science building.
7:30 o'clock-All men in Company A,
officers' corps, who have had one or
more years of military training meet
548 South State street.
TOMORROW
11:00 o'clock-Meeting of fresh en-
gineers to elect spring contests cap-
tains, 348 Engineering building.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of soph lits
to nominate a student councilman, and
to elect spring contests captains, 101
Economics building.
4:00 o'clock-Meeting of soph en-
gineers to elect spring contests cap-
tains, 348 Engineering building.
8:00 o'clock-Frieda Hempel. in
first concert of the May Festival, Hill
auditorium.
U-NOTICES
Choral tnion ushers see Mr. Hollands
at the library today if they wish to
usher for the May Festival.'
Meeting of the Russian Literary so-
ciety, in room 317 Engineering build-
ing, at 7:00 o'clock, May 23.
Fresh engineers baseball practice,
3:30 o'clock, south Ferry field.
Special meeting of Quadrangle to-
night; elections.
Fresh lit baseball practice today at
3:00 o'clock. South Ferry field.
Class dues of the senior engineers
are to be collected today and tomor-
row on the second floor of the Engi-
neering building. The money for in-
vitations will be collected at this time.
Classes in the colleges of Engineer-
ing and Architecture will be held as
usual on Thursday and'Friday of this1
week. Those students participating
in the engineering exhibit may be ex-
cused by their instructors, if previ-
ously arranged with those instructors
whose classes they must miss.
LOUIS A. HOPKINS,
Secretary of the Colleges of ,
Engineering and Architecture.

AMERICANS KILL 3 BANDITS
Unfriendly 1emonstrations at Tampico
I
Cause Order for Readiness
of Gun Boats
El Paso, May 15.-Every bridge
along the Southern Pacific railroad
from San Antonio to El Paso was or-
dered tonight to be ,placed under
guard. The order came from General
Funston, commanding the southern
military department and means the
sending of troops from here to San
Antonio.* The Southern Pacific paral-
lels the Mexican border between here
and San Antonio and is used for troop
movements. The precautions were
deemed necessary following incen-
diary attacks on Fort Bliss Saturday
night and the report last night and
today that Mexicans were planning a
raid on the road at Sierra Blanca, a
small town in the east end of El Paso
county. It is possible that the order
for troop protection will be extended
to the El Paso & Southwestern rail-
road west of here as it runs near the
Mexican border.
It is considered possible that some
of the militia will be sent into the
Big Bend region as the people there
are badly. frightened following the
Glenn Springs massacre and the loot-
ing of Boquillas and Deemers. All
ranches of the lower Boquillas and
Glenn Springs districts are deserted.
The ran chmen and their families are
concentrated at McKinney Springs
standing guard. Refugees have been
gathering there hourly u-ntil now th
ranchmen believe they are capable of
(Continued on Page Six)
RUSSIANS WIN FROM TURKS
French Continue Repulse (tf Ger mans
in the Verdun
Trenches
Petrograd, May 15.-Russian troops
drove the Turks from Rivanduza on
the Caucasus front and seized ammu-
nition depots, says a report. The
czar's cavalry is in close pursuit of
the fleeing forces.
French Troops Battle at Verdun
Paris, May 15.-French troops drove
the enemy from a first line trench
near Vermanudevilliers south of
Somme, acording to an official'istate-
ment issued here today. Around Ver-
dun heavy bombardments in the re-
gion of Avancourt Wood constituted
practically the only activity. . In the
Champagne region the French cleaned
out a German work west of Mont Tent
taking several prisoners.
MABEL GARRISON IN FESTIVAL
Replaces Florence Hinkle Who Ilas
Severe Throat Affection
Miss Mabel Garrison, prima donna
soprano of the Metropolitan Opera
company, has been secured to take the
place in the May Festival program of
Florence Hinkle, who has been for-
bidden by her physician to sing for
three or four weeks on account of a
severe affection of the throat.
Miss Garrison has been associated
with the Metropolitan Opera com-
pany for two years during which time
she has firmly established herself in
the admirtion and esteem of the
Metropolitan opera goers. She will
sing at the Thursday evening and Fri-
day afternoon concerts.

Gargoyle.
Daily....

1 2 3
3 0 1
2 4 0

4 5 6 7 8 9 R.
0 0 2 0 1 0- 7
3 1 1 0 7 x-18

H.
5
10

E.
12
0

,_--_

Fiction

"Master David," Grace Vi
Boynton, Gradm
"Her French B otd" Mirian
Hubbard, '16.
"Recrucled P. rc
Play," Ed. P. Wright.~

Have a Dime Ready
The Inlander

Articles
Discussion of the Michigan
Union, W.W. Schroder,'16
Law.
Student Life at Platlsburg,
Dr. Rufus Tucker, Ph. D.
A Remedy for ichigan over
Organization, T. Hawley
Tappina, '16 Law.4

Out Today-3 o'clock--Get Yours Early

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