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May 14, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-14

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-.

I

TPE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

I 437A

rnes :-Editorial 2414
Businens 960
Y lTLLW APlI SERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

VOL XXVI. No. 157.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 14, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CE'E'

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ITHANSDEFEAT
ARSITY TEAM BY
TALLYIN FIFTH
MILLER PITCHES SPECTACULAR
BALL DURING ENTIRE
GAME
RUSSEL ALLOWS LONE HIT
Wild 'Throw by Walterhouse Against
Tifrd Base Bleachers Allows
Ludwig to Score
Pitcher Russell of Cornell all but
inscribed. his name upon the sacred
scroll of baseball immortals yester-
day afternoon, when he let the Wol-
verines down gently with one lone
solitary hit, and that the contribu-
tion of a pinch hitter in the last half
of the ninth.
Cornell won.the game 1 to 0, but in
all justice to "Shorty" Miller one
should take full cognizance of the
fact that "Shorty" was in no way re-
sponsible for the run. He pitched
magnificent ball all afternoon, but one
4f his supporting cast erred griev-
ousiy at just the wrong moment, and
a red-egged visitor flashed acrss
the plate when he should have been
thrown out by a city block at third
base.
Cornell's run came in the fifth. With
one jown, Miller passed Ludwig. This
was te first base on balls that the
lanky boy had issued in 19 consecu-
tive innings and it was the only one
all afternoon, Eckley drove one
straight back at Miller which the
pitcher deflected, but Eckley sprinted
safely to first. Ludwig meanwhile
conceived the brilliant idea of offering
an impersonation of Tyrus Raymond
Cobb and he tried to go all the way
to third. Walterhouse pounced on the
ball, and with Ludwig still 25 feet
away from third, tlhe Michgan short-
stop arched the bal oer' against the
third base bleachers and Ludwig scam-
pered home.
In the ninth Coach Lundgren sent
Reen in to hit for Miller. It was his
first kppearance at the plate, and after
fouling a coule over the stands, he
slapped one straigit back through the
box. Eckley cut over from short like
a flash, but the ball bunced against
lhe base and Reem reaehed frst in
safety. !
Russell grew annoyed at this
unexpected break, and he fanne
(Continued on Page Five)
INLANDER OUT THIS WEEK
Contains Play by E. P. Wright,'16, and
Contributions from Faculty Writers
Besides the story of Quaker life,
,vritten by Grace Boynton,. graduate,
anc' another of a lighter nature en-
titled "Her French Blood," by Miriam
Hubbard, '16, a play, "Recrucified,"
by Edward P. Wright, '16, has alsoj
been selected for publication in thef
May number of !Ile Inlander, which is
to appear about the middle of thist
week.
The play follows closely the style
of the old miracle plays and its cene-
is laid before' a wayside shrine. Ther
moral is said to be fraught with deep
significance, and the dialogue through-7
out exceptionally well handled.
One of the four poems selected dealst
with Cap Night, one of the oldest tra-

itional events on Michigan's campus.1
Another and longer contribution in
verse is entitled "Brooks and Springs"1
tand is said to possess the joyful spirit
Hof the great outdoors. A third is a
translation from the Greek by Mr.
Martin Feinstein of the Rhetoric de-
partment. This is more of a traduc-'
tion than a literal translation and
contains passages of remarkable beau-
ty. Mr. M. C. Wier, also of the Rhe-
toric department, has furnislwd thet
,magazine with a bit of verse-a frgg-r
;ment on the reading of Homer.E
PROF. G. W. PATTERSON ELECTED
VIVERSITY CLUB PRESIDENT'
Professor G. W. Patterson was elect-
ed president of the University club at'
the' annual meeting of that organiza-'
tion held last night. Professor Evans
Holbrook was re-elected treasurer, andl
Mr. W. B. Shaw will again act as
secretary. Professor H. A. Kenyonc
was elected to the board of directors.1

Seniors to March
In '16 Swing-out
__ 1
(lasses Wiil Assemble on Campus
Lawn ('fe~day Afternoon
at 4:05 o'Clock
Approximately 1300 seniors, repre-
senting all ,the schools and colleges
of the university, will assemble on the
campus lawn Tuesday afternoon at
4:05 o'clock preparatory to the annual
Swing-out parade.
From their assigned stations on the
campus the senior classes from the
various departments will march to
University hall, where short exercises
will be held, beginning promptly at
4:30 o'clock. Following the invoca-
tion by Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, of the
Congregational church, president Har-
ry B. Hutchins will deliver a short ad-
dress to the seniors. Several vocal
numbers will be rendered by Chase B.
Sikes, '16.
The promenade about the campus
will begin at 5:00 o'clock. The class-
es will march in the following order
lits, engineers, architects, medics,
laws, pharmics, homeops, and dents.
The line of march, together with the
positions assigned to the various
classes will be published later.
VARSITY TENNIS TEAM
WINS FROM RENSSALER
Michigan Outclasses Easterners in
First Match of
Trip
Albany ,N. Y., May 13.-Michigan's
Varsity tennis team defeated Renssal-
aer Polytechnic Institute in the first
match on the eastern trip yesterday
by a 42 score. The Varsity complete-
ly outqfrssed the easterners and had
things entirely its way all during the
match.
Michigan won three out of the four
singles and broke even in the doubles.
Captain Crawford's match with Mc-
Donald of Renssalaer was unusually
long, the score in one set being 16-14,
in favor of the lter.
Summaries follow: Singles-McDn-
ald (R) d. Crawford (M), 6-3, 16-14;
Mack (M) d. Haight (R), 6-0, 6-1;
Switzer (M) d. Courtney (R), 6-3, 6-3;
and Sherwood (M) d. Reeves (R), 6-1,
6-0. Doubles-McDonald and Haight
(R) d. Crawford and Mack (M), 6-4,
446, 6-3; Switzer and Sherwood (M)
d. Breese and Morris (R), 6-1, 6-1.
The team will stop over in New
York today. The net match will
be with Brown University at rvi-
dence, R. I., tomorrow.
TALKS ON "JEW AND THE WA"
Samuel Strauss of New Yor Adres-
es Menorah Society Tonight
"The Jew and the War" is the sub-
ject of an address to be delivered be-
fore the Menorah society by Samuel
Strauss, of New York, at 8:00 o'clock:
this evening in Newberry hall. Mr.
Strauss, who at various times has been
associated with the New York Times
and the New York Globe, is known to
most of the eastern Menorah societies
as an excellent speaker. He is a
member of the Menorah Graduate Ad-
visory committee and the Menorah
College of Lecturers.
The next meeting of the society will
be held on June 4, at which time the
semi-annual election of oficers will

be held.
ELECT FIFTEEN TO MASQUES
Women's Honorary Dramatle SocIety
Takes in New Members
Fifteen new members were elected
to Masques, the women's honorary drw
matic society, Friday evening. Those
elected followv -
Eva Shgrrow, '17, Helen G. Davis,
'17, Mary M. V '.8, Jnez M. Gose,
'17, Helen M, Rickey, '17, Ruth H.
Lenzner, '17, Dorothy W. Gruss, '19,
Florence 13, Paddock, '17, Lois F. May,
'18, Eva M. Bowen, '18, Pearl Smith,
'17, Harriet K. Walker, '17, Portia
Walker, '18, Gladys L. Whelan, '17,
Elaine H. Tappan, '19.
Proficiency in some form of campus
drama is prerequisite to membership
in this society.

SECURE SPEKERS
FOR PEP MEETINGS
OF TWO CLASSES
ABRAMS, SCHROEDER, JOHN AND
MULLENDORE CHOSEN BY
CHAIRMAN MACK
WILL EXPLAIN NEW RULES
Pushball Contest Will Be Less Dan-
gerous; "Flying Squadrons"
Prohibited
* *
* "WEIGHING IN" CONTINUES *
NEED1 40 EN FOR RELAYS
* "Weighing in" for the three *
* tug-of-war teams of the fresh- *
men and sophomores will be *
continued in Waterman gym, *
* main floor, Monday and Tues- *
day afternoon, from 2:00 to 3:30 *
o'clock. More men must turn *
* out as but few were weighed in *
* Friday, sophomores especially. *
* Twenty men from each class *
* are needed for the relay races. *
* Try-outs for these events will *
be held at Ferry field Monday *
* and Tuesday, from 3:30 o'clock *
to 6:00 o'clock. *
** * * * * * * * * * * *
Speakers for the two "Pep" meet-
ings of the underclasses in prepara-
tion for the spring contests were an-
nounced last night by Francis T.
Mack, '16E, general chairman of the
spring contests The meeting of the
freshmen on Wednesday night will be
addressed by Staatz M. Abrams, '17E,
and Werner W. Schroeder, '16L, while
"Wap" John, '16, and "Bill" Mullen-
dore, '16L, will attempt to instill pep
into the second year men at the meet
ing on Thursday. The new rules for
the different events will also be ex-
plained at these meetings and the
student council urgently requests
every male student in the two under-
classes to attend the meetings,
Safety First Measures Taken
The four new rules for the pushball
contest will materially lessen the ele-
ment of danger to participants, ac-
cording to A. S. Hart, '17, and Grant
L. Cook, '17L, members of the student
council committee which drafted the
new safety provisions.
In the past with the ball starting
from the ground the danger of injury
was much greater. This year the ball
will starp and remain off the ground
during the entire period of the con-
test. This will be accomplished at
the start by the two classes forming
on ppposite sides of the ball, with the
foremost men on each side upholding
it. At a signal from the student
councilman in charge the contest will
start.
"FIying Squdrogs" Tabooed
In providing that students shall not
get upon the shoulders of other con-
testants, the committee also elimin-
ated much danger of personal in-
jury, because it was this practice in
the past that was responsible for a
great many of the hurts
"Flying squadrons" will not be tol-
erated, this year, either, nor will any
rushing of any description from the
outside. The affair will be divided
into four quarters of five minutes
each, with a five minute intermission
intervening between each quarter.

Outsiders Can't Help ope-Pullers
The Tug-of-war will begin at 4:00
o'clock Friday afternoon, May 19. Sev-
eral new rules Will be in effect dur-
ing this contest also. The contest-
ants for the two sides will both prqb-
ably he wired in from the spectators,
and every effort will he made to pre-
vent any foputside help. ' trict
precautions will e taken to prevent
(Cogtiued on Page Six)

German Attacks
Fail at Verdun,

LATllINlEBICAN NATIONS ASSURE
UNITED STATES OF il ORAL SUPPORT
IN CASE OF IVNTION INMEXICC

Teutons Repulsed, Paris Claims Whi
French Gain Near
f 11111 27
Paris, May 13.-After bombardig
the French lines in the sector between
Bois de Avocourt and Hill 304 all last
night the Germans made two attacks
on the left bank of the Meuse today,
one to the west of Hill 304, and the
other in the nature of a surprise at-
tack on the northeast slope of Le
Mort Homme. Both attacks failed
completely.
After these assaults the German
guns lessened the severity of their fire
on the hither bank of the river. On
the west bank and in the Woevre there
was comparative calm all day.
Last night the French made further
progress in the vicinity of Hill 287,
while the Germans gave their atten-
tion to the east bank of the river
renewing their attack on the Fort
Douaumont-Vaux line and the region
of the Bois de la Caillette. These at-
tacks were preceded by a violent ar-
tillery fire, but the French lines were
held at every point and the Germans
were repulsed with serious losses.
After the failure of these attempts
the Germans shifted their attacks
slightly to the west to the north of
Thiaumont Farm. The French fire
blocked all progress.
DOYOFISHER SPEAKS T
LAST TAYLOR MEETING
enry ° P. Kendal Rpeats Port io of
Talk on Scientiti
Managment
WitU H. S. Person, president of the
society, in the chair, the final session
of the Taylor Society for the Promo-
I Wan of Scientific Management was
he'd yeisterday mocrning.
The princnnl speaker of the morn-
ing was Boyd lkisher, vice-president
of the xectives' club, Detroit Bqard
of Commerce, who made a long plea
for the injection of the human inter-
est element into the handling of em-
ployees.
Henry P. Kendall, of the Plimpton
Press, Norwood, Mass., repeated a
portion of a former talk on "Scienti-
fic Management, Its Nature and Sig-
nificance," giving special attention to
the influence exerted by labor unions.
At the close of the session the dele-
gates adjourned to the Michigan
Union, where luncheon was served.
In the afternoon the members of the
society attended the Michigan-Cornell
baseball game on Ferry field as guests
of the university.
Webster Society
Wins Cup D ebate
Award Victory to Negative Team in
Eighteenth Annual Discussion
of Series
The Webster Debating society last
night received the big end of a two
to one decision in this year's final cup
debate between it and the Adelphi
House of Representatives. The team
of the Webster society, Dorothy V.
McCormick, '181L, S. F. Cohn, 118,
and A. P. Bogue, '181, debated the
negative side of the discussion. The
affirmative was upheld by J. R. Simp-
son, '18M, H. D. Hopkins, '16, and W
A. Pearl, '16.
Last night's debate was the eight-
eenth contest of a series of 20 annual
debates for the final possession of the
cup.
Choral Union to Hold Rehearsal Today
The Choral Union will hold its first
rehearsal in Hill auditorium this aft-

ernoon at 3:00 o'clock and will enter
the building by the rear doors. The
members are requested to come- a
little early as the stage seats will be
assigned and tickets admitting to the
concerts given out at this time.

*

*
*
*
'-

* * -* * * * *~ * **
The mothers of America t
today receive the tribute of ihe
wholenation i""na blic expres-
tion of lobe a-d reverence. The
boys, girlh and grownups will
all wear car ations as a token
of remiembrance. red for those
whose mothers are living and
white for those who are dead.
All public buil'ings will dis-
play the American ag in ac-
cordince viih a resolution pas-
c,7° by the lhted S tes Con-
gre ss.

*:
*
*
*
*
*
*
*z
*
*
*
*o
:w
*:
: :

: >i:i * * * * * 4*

--
Qisum Ir hu s Much 1)1cusiom;
7a ny Are Non- Cent it tal
Wi n Q es tieaed
Shall Ferry field he thrown open
on Sundays?
A canvass of proinent faculty
members yse lyrv aled(iver-
gence of opinion as to whether Michi-
gan students shall follow th>eir in-
divida <1 inclinations with regard to
athletic exercise on Sunday, or wheth-
er the university authorities shall of-
ficially recognize suhproclivities by
throwing ope e to Ferry field
oil the Sabbath.
Owing to the relative recency of the
l scussion, by far the greater number
of men inerrogated refused to com-
mit themselves to either side of the
d(liscUrSsOnt .111nioTi1g th'cze ,tlPiesi-
dent iarry B. utlhins, Den Mor-
tinmer E,. Cooley and Registrar Arthur
Gi Hall. A nmber were inclined to
support half way measures, while the
remainder were either heartily in fa-
vor of the plan or strenuously opposed
to it.
"I have given the matter no serious
thought, but oni first con-sidleration it
seems that, under proper restrictions,
the plan would be bzneficial."-Dean
Henry M. Bates.
"I should not object to seeing Ferry
field open on Sunday afternoons. A
great number of boys go tramping and
canoeing anyway, and I do not see
why they should not be permitted to
exercise their limbs on the university
athletic groundis.:"-Dean J. 0. Schlot-
terbeck.
"I should have no objections to see-
ing Ferry field open on Sunday after-
noons. In fact, I think it E uld be
a good thing for the boys." --Prof. J.
A. C. Ihildner.
"If 'erry field is to be opened at all
(Continued on Page Six)
I - --, - I
Wecatlhe re for Ami Arbor and
I- I.I
8:00 o'cloc--.amuel Strauss speaks.
on "The Jew a d the War," Newberry
hall.
10:30 -l-c -John Mason Wells
speaks on "Circe's Palace or Michi-
gan's Saloon," Bptist Church.
10:3q o'cleck--other's Day in the
Presbyterian church, addresses by
Louis C. .1eimaun, N. U. PinLey and
Leonard A. Barrett.
TOMORR W
7:30 o'cc--Meeting of the Admin-
istrative board, U-hall.

PROMIS E F 1BACKING IEGAUDEI:
A SPOWERFUL IP LOMATIC
L EVER
AGREE T KEEP HANDS OF
Ofiia lHopeful of Avoiding Extreunm
Step; President Wilson
Deterumned
BULLETIN
1ield Headquarters, American Ex.
1eition near Namiquipa, Mexico, b
radio it Columbus, New Mexico, May
1i.- ancho Villa with 1,100 follow-
ers was reported today at a rac
near (arrizo, 40 miles northwest of
La Asceension. The band was report-
ed scatered alonmg the Rio Corralitos,
iuadle t. of recruits fron Sonora state
and a sprinkibig of the men who es
coitedt Vila through the Sierra Madres.
Washington, May 13.-The Ameri-
can government has -received unoffi-
cial assurances from the governments
of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Bolivia,
Crugnay and Guatemala, that they will
interpose no objections if the United
Ststes finds it necessary to intervene
in M~exico.
Altiou gliPresident Wilson is deter-
inined to avoid such a step if possible,
the assurances of moral support re-
('ceived from these governmentstare re-
garded as a powerful lever in the dp-
l atic negotiations with Carranza.
This is especially true, inasmuch as
three of these powers joined with the
United States last fall in deciding to
recognize the Carranza government
after a vain appeal for union of the
tvao factions in Mexico.
Inforu ation Anoritative
Although the source of the informa-
Hion cannot be disclosed, it may be
hate d authoritatively that not only
have these six Latin-Anerican powers
signified their willingness to keep
hands of, but also they have gone so
far as to indicate their willingness
to back up the United States with all
the moral support they could muster.
Latiin-mericans Change Attitude
.Throughout the tortuous progress of
Mlexican developments, one of the seri-
ous features to which the administra-
tion attaches faith has been the atti-
tide o the rest of the Latin-Ameri-
ca. republics. Suspicious of the at-'
tcntiois of the United States, Latin-
Aaiuica has looked askance at any-
thin; like the use of coercion on the
part of this country toward any of
the Latin-American republics..
These same six powers during the
Pan--American conference last fall
made it plain in assurances to Gener-
al Carranza that they would not sub-
scribe to any step by the United States
looking to armed intervention in
Mexico. According to the informa-
tion which has been .brought to the
President, there has recently been a
decided change of heart on the part
of the countries in question.
Symnpathze With Americans
Convinced now that the United
States has no ulterior purpose, the
Preident has been advised that 4e
had strained the limits of patience,
and that the American republic had
stood for more from the Mexican* out-
laws than any other country would
have.
Cheered by Obregon Report
Officials of the administration, how-
ever, are still hopeful that interven-
tion can be avoided. They were
greatly encouraged this afternoon by
a report received from Major-General
Scott following the adjournment of
his conference with General Obregon.
The report confirmed the impression
here that while the conference did not

rsult in ny formal agreement, a
tadk understanding was reached
which, unless an untoward incideni
should occur with the naval or mili-
tary forces of the two governments
Wil e acted upon in harmony.
Oe War department received fron
Brigadier-General Pershing today a
report stating that he was carrying
out the orders given him to move his
base further south and shorten his line

. ..
. _.
. _.
_ _ _.

phI Ecatiiosuis for lusio

to thel

II

First Methodist Church

State Street, Corner of'Washington
A. W. STALKER, D. D., MINISTER
.. . . /
PROF. M. SIMPSON
OF LANSING
WILL BE IN CHARGE OF THE
MORNING SERVICE, 10:30 - EVENING SERVICE, Musical, 7:30

combined courses must be filed on or
before May 115,Blanks may be obti-ned
from the Reitrar.
Prof.J. II, ltmi. wil adress the
lducational club at 7:00 o'clock Mon-
day, All men interested in teaching
are invited to attend.
J-lt clas meeting Tuesday after-

noon at 4:00 o'clock, 101 Economics of co nnication from the
building, fcr the purpose of electing stated that he had seen no s
two representatives on the Student Carranza troops during tl
Council for next tear. hution of his forces.

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