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May 12, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-12

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b

TPE DAILY
500
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS I

CIUGAN

Phones :-Editi
Busi
TELEGUnAPH SERi

ness
VICE~ I:

E I YORK S Gvr

VOL. XXVI. No. 155.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 12, 1916.

PRICE Fl

NEW RULINGS FOR
SPRING CONTESTS
TO INSURE SAFETY

STUDENT
SEEKS
OF

COUNCIL COMMITTEE
TO LESSEN DANGEB
FORMER GAMES

I,

"PEP" MEETINGS TO BE HELD
Pushball 3Iiist Be Kept Off Ground;
Float in River to Award Deci-
sions in Tug-of-War .
New rules will prevail during the
spring contests next week end, accord-
ing to a statement given out yester-
day by Francis T. Mack, '16E, general
chairman of the Student Council com-
mittee in charge of the annual battles
between the two lower classes. Prob-
ably the most important of the dhanges
which make for safety will be that
in the pushball contest a new ruling
this year provides that the big ball
must start and remain off the ground.
This will greatly lessen the dangers
incident to the struggle, and will make
it easier to move the ball about. In
addition, poles marking the boundaries
of the two sides will be used for the
first time.
"Pep" meetings for the two classes
will be held next week, the freshmen:
meeting next Wednesday night, and
the second year men holding their ses-
sion on Thursday night. Both meet-
ings will be addressed by men prom-
inent on the campus and will be held
in the auditorium of the Natural Sci-
ence building.
At the tug-of-war this year -a float
will be placed in mid-stream for the
first time to aid in awarding the de-
cision, which will be given at the
end of 20 minutes to the side which
has pulled the flag on the middle of
the big rope nearest to its own side
of the river. The battle will be staged
either at the gas plant or at Wall!
street, the choice depending on thel
height of the water in the river at
the time of the affair.
Pharnmacy Students Visit Detroit
Two big Detroit plants, those of the
Ford Motor company and Frederick
Stearns and company, willbe visited
by the students and faculty of the
College of Pharmacy on their inspec-
tion trip to that city today. The party
will leave on the Michigan Central at
7:00 o'clock this morning.
Musical CLUBS DISCUSS
EORGAIZATION PLANS
Pass Motion Calling for Committee
of Five to Look Up
Data

ANNOUNCE EAMINATIONS1
TESTS TO START JUNE 12
Literary, Engineering, and Pharmacy
College Schedules Made
Pblick
The second semester examinations
in the college of literature, science,
and the arts, the colleges of engineer-
ing and architecture, and the college
of pharmacy begin Monday, June 12.
and will be held in accordance with
the following schedule: Monday or
Wednesday classes at 8:00 o'clock
(and C. E. 2), first Monday morning;
at 9:00 o'clock, second Monday morn-
ing; at 10:00 o'clock, first Saturday
morning; at 11:00 o'clock. first Tues-
day morning; at .1:00 o'clock, second
Wednesday morning; at 2:00 o'clock
(and M. E. 2), first Wednesday after-
noon; at 3:00 o'clock, second Tuesday
morning. Tuesday or Thursday
classes at 8:00 o'clock, first Tuesday
afternoon; at 9:00 o'clock, second
Monday afternoon; at 10:00 o'clock,
first Wednesday morning; at 11:00
o'clock, first Friday morning; at 1:00
o'clock (and Shop 3), second Tuesday
afternoon; at 2:00 o'clock, first Fri-
day afternoon; at 3:00 o'clock (and
E. M. 1 and 2), first Thursday afternoon.
Friday classes any hour, (and E. M.
3), second Wednesday afternoon; Sat-
urday classes any hour, second Thurs-
day afternoon; classes 4:00 to 6:00
o'clock and day, second Thursday
morning; drawing 4, 5, 4a, and 5a, first
Thursday morning; shop 2 and
4 and C. E. 3, first Monday af-
ternoon; shop 1 o'clock and E. M.
4, first Saturday afternoon. Examina-
tions for irregular classes will be held
the first Monday afternoon, first Thurs-
day morning, first Saturday afternoon,
second Wednesday afternoon, or sec-
ond Thursday afternoon.
In the college of literature, science,
and the arts and the college of phar-
macy morning examination begin at
9:00 o'clock, in the colleges of engi-
neering and architecture at 8:00
o'clock. All afternoon examinations
begin at 2:00 o'clock .
Varsity 'and to
Play on Campus
Will Give First of Open-Air Concerts
Tlls Evening in Band Stand;
to Be Weekly Affair
The initial open-air concert of the
season will be given by the Varsity
band at 6:45 o'clock this evening in
the campus band stand. Captain
Wilson has an especially fine program
to offer.
This concert is the first of a series
of open air entertainments to be given
on the campus each Friday evening
until commencement. In addition, the
band men will be kept busy with a
long list of special concerts in con-
nection with different campus events.
The numbers to be rendered this eve-
ning are as follows:
1. March, "Under the Double Eagle"
Wagner
2. Selection,......."Blue Paradise"
Eycler and Romberg
3. WaltZ, .."Wedding of the Winds"
Hall
4. March, "Gate City"......Monaco
5. Selection, "Chin-Chin".....Caryll
6. (a) March, "Same Old Sweethearts"
Monaco
(b) March, . ."Ragging the Scale"
Claypoole,
7. "Star Spangled Banner."

Prof. Trueblood Goes to Delaware
Prof. T. C. Trueblood, of the oratory
department, was called to the bedside
of Professor Fulton at Ohio Wesleyan
university, at Delaware, Ohio, yester-
day. Professor Fulton is expected to
live only a short time, and Professor
Trueblood has been closely associated
with him for many years, having writ-
ten textbooks and studied oratory with
him at Ohio Wesleyan and at Jack-
son, Illinois.

TAYLOR SOCIETY
METS FOR FIRST
PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHINS
ADDRESSES OPENING
ASSEMBLY
PURPOSE CALLED EDUCATIONAL
More Than 150 Business Men astd
?Manufacturers Attending
Conference
"I would give a great deal for the
secret of scientific management as
applied to a university," said Presi-
dent Harry B. Hutchins, in opening
the Taylor conference on scientific
management yesterday afternoon in
the Engineering building. "We waste
space and energy and also suffer a
less by duplication."<
In his response for the Tayhkr so-
ciety, Harlow S. Person, '99, president,
stated that the purpose of the society
was educational. A business meeting
and a session of the board of govern-
ors concluded the afternoon's program.
"Scientific Management: Its Nature
and Significance," was the subject of
the evening's address, delivered by
Henry P. Kendall, treasurer of the
Plimpton Press, Norwood, Mas. A
smoker at the Union followed the ad-
dress.
Today is the biggest day of the con-
ference. Three lectures will be given
as follows:
9:00 o'clock. Chairman, Prof. H. C.
Adams, of the economics department.
Lecture on "Scientific Methods of
Management Applied to Various Types
of Industry," by Sanford E. Thonp-
son, Boston, Mass.
2:30 o'clock. Chairman, Dean M. E.
Cooley, of the engineering college.
Lecture on "Scientific Management in
the Operation of a Pub c Servie' .
poration" (illustrated), by Charles
Day, Philadelphia, Pa.
8:00 o'clock, evening Chairman:
Boyd Fisher, vice-president of the Ex-
ecutive club, Detroit Board of Com-
merce. Lecture on "An Illustrated
Trip Through Scientifically Managed
Factories," by H. K. Hathaway, Phila-
delphia, Pa. 1
These lectures will all be held in
room 348 of the Engineering building.
At 10:00 o'clock in the morning, the
six discussion sections will be held
as follows: A, paper, pulp, textiles,
room 411; B, clothing, boxes, envel-
opes, handkerchiefs, printing, room
445; C, machine shops, room 311; D,
automobiles, room 348; E, construc-
tion work, room 229; F, sales man-
agement, room 246. All rooms are
in the Engineering building.
These sessions of the Taylor society
are open to the public. More than 150
business men and manufacturers were
on hand to attend the opening of the
conference, which is the society's first
in the west.
SPHINX HOLDS INITIATIONS
Nine Sophomores Taken Into Honor-
ary Society Yesterday
Sphinx, junior lit honorary society,
held its spring initiation yesterday
afternoon. The following members
of the sophomore class were taken

into the society: Walter R. Atlas, J.
William Edwards, Harold C. L. Jack-
son, Frank K. Miller, Carl W. Neu-
mann, Leland N. Scofield, Victor H.
Simmons, Cedric C. Smith and Leland
S. Thompson. Prof. C. B. Vibbert, of
the philosophy department, was ad-
mitted as an honorary member.
At the initiation banquet short talks
were given by H. G. Muzzy, '17, W. T.
Adams, '17, W. R. Atlas, '18, L. S.
Roehm, '16, and Prof. C. B. Vibbert.

CONSTITUTION AOPTED
BY ORATORICL 'BODY
Women Admitted to Association Board
by New Instrumen-
At a meeting of the .Oratorical as-
sociation held yesterday afternoon a
new constitution was adopted pro-
viding for a change in the organiza-
tion of the association. The new con-
stitution differs from the old in that it
admits women to the board, one from
each literary class, and provides for
a separation of legislative and execu-
tive powers in the organization.
The oratorical board will consist
of one man and one woman from each
literary class, one delegate from each
law class, four debating society dele-
gates and four student officers of the
association, elected by the student
body at large. It will also include the
professors and Instructors of the ora-
tory department.
Detroit Defeats
varsity squad
Veterans Outclass Michigan Racquet
Wielders by Score of
Five to Two
Michigan's tennis squad suffered a
five to two defeat yesterday afternoon
at the hands of the Detroit Tennis club
in that city. The rival team was com-
posed of veterans, and the Varsity
squad, although outclassed, met with
a form of play which should prove of
much value to them on their eastern
trip, which starts this afternoon.
Following are the results of yes-
terday's matches. Singles: Doty (D) de-
feated Crawford (M), 6-0, 6-2; Emer-
son (D), defeated Mack (M), 14-16, 9-7,1
6-2 O*en(D) defeated Sherwood
(M), 6-2, 6-3; Switzer (M) defeated
Atkinson (D), 6-2, 3-6, 6-1; Codd (M)
defeated Donovan (D), 7-5, 4-6, 6-3.1
Doubles: Hibbard and Stone (D) de-
'Oated Crawford and Mack (M), -2,
6-1; Doty and Owen (D) . defeated '
Sherwood and Switzer (M), 10-8, 6-4.y
Final score, 5-2. .
Cosmop olites to
Dan quet Tonight,
Edwin Penby, . President Hutchins,
Prof. Hldner, and Frank Olnm-
stead to Be Speakers
Dishes strange, dishes new, dishes
savory and unsavory, dishes from ev-
ery quarter of the globe, whose praises
have been sung in a dozen tongues,
will be placed before the guests at the'
Cosmopolitan club banquet to be held
in Barbour gymnasium at 8:00 o'clock
this evening. From "shira," a Hindu
dainty, to plain, unromantic ice creams
characterizing the United States, the
menu will be replete with all manner
of appetizing delicacies.
The principal address of the even-
ing will be delivered by ex-Congress-
man Edwin Denby, of Detroit, after
which President Harry B. Hutchins,
M. Kiyohara, '16, and Frank Olmstead,t
'16, president-elect of the club, will1
give short talks.l
William Robertson, '16D, will act as
toastmaster for the evening. Music
will be furnished by the Wesleyan
guild orchestra. The banquet is open
to all students of the university, and
tickets may be secured at Wahr's, the1
Michigan Union, and the Y. M. C. A.

Tickets for University Dance on Sale
Tickets for this week's University1
dance at the Packard academy Sat-
urday night will go on sale in the co'r-
ridor of University hall between 11:00
and 12:00 o'clock and 2:00 and 3:00
o'clock today, and from 11:00 to 12:00
o'clock Saturday. The dance will last
from 9:00 to 12:00 o'clock. Mr. and
Mrs. G. D. Bradley will be the chap-
erons. -

'C' * * * * * * * * *

OBREIGON AND SCOTT, FAILING TO
RECONCILE DIFFRENCES5, DEC10
I TO ADJOURN CONFERENCE SESSI

TUG-OF-WAR WEIGHING'
AT GY- TODAY

x-IN

-:1

Freshmen and sophomores will
be weighed in for the three
tug-of-war teams on the main
floor of Waterman gym from
2:00 to 3:30 o'clock today. 4n-
ter by side door. Three teams
of 40 men each will be selected
for each class. The light-
weights must weigh under 135
pounds, the middleweights under
160, and the heavyweights un-
der 180 pounds,
* * * * * * * * * * *

*'
*_;.
*x
*:
*:
y,
*
*:
*

MEETINGS DECLARED FR
American Generals Go to Co
New Mexico, to Inspeci
Army Base
BULLETIN
Maratlion, Tex., May il.
raid by a band of Mexicans o
Texas line is reported south
The news was brought here
and the report said the Mexic
dits raided several ranches
'Texas side and drove off hor
stock, taking them back to
Several ranch houses were bur
report says.

MEXICAN MINISTER OF
LEAVE AT ONCE FOR
WCO CITY

General Goethals to Resign June 1
Panama, May 11.-General Goethals
announced today that he would re-
sign June 1. It is understood here
that he will not resign if "fere is
trouble with Germany.
PROF GAYLEYOELIYERS
,'PHI BETA KAPPA SPEECH
Talks on "Shakespeare's Humanity"
at Ninth Annual Initiation
Banquet
"Shakespeare's Humanity" was the
subject of Prof. Charles Mills Gayley,
who gave the principal address at
the Phi Beta Kappa initiation banquet
held last evening in ,Barbouir gym.
Professor Gayley is the author of the
"Yellow and the Blue." He comes from
the University of California, where
he is professor of English. The ini-
tiation banquet held las evening was
tJhe ninth 'annual dinrier given by
the Alpha of Michigan of the Phi
Beta Kappa society, .nd was held in
honor of the new members from the
class of 1916.
Prof. Wooster W. Beman, of the
mathematics department, who is presi-
dent of the local chapter, responded
to a toast on the part of the society,
in giving the new members an official
welcome.

i.--

I

L

WHAT'S GOING ON~

El Paso, May 11.-General 01
Mexican minister of war, and C
Hugh L. Scott, chief of staff
United States army, decided t
that it was useless to continue
efforts to reconcile the differen
the two countries over the An
expedition into Mexico and adj
the sessions of the conferenc
have, been holding.
General Obregon will leave a
for Mexico City, and General Sc
companied by General Funston,
first to Columbus, New Mexico,
spect the American army base
and then to San Antonio, Texas
eral Funston's headquarters. G
Scott will then return to Wash
In adjourning their conference
Generals Scott, Obregon and F
issued a joint statement in whi:
declared that their meetings ha
peaceful and friendly and thw
friendly relations of the two cou
we uld continue.
John C. Kenned
Speaks Toni,
Chicago Alderman Will Speak
ciahisni in Newberry Hal
at 7:30 o'Clock
Join C. Kennedy, Chicago ak
and prominent socialist, will
on "Socialism, the Fulfillment o
ocracy," at 7:30 o'clock this e
in Newberry hall. The lectux
be held under the auspices
Michigan branch of the Intercol
Socialist society.
Mr. Kennedy is a graduate of (
university and for some time
position in the economics faci
the University of Chicago. A
mate connection with the socia
vey work recently completed
industrial centers of Chicago r
the speaker unusually fitted t
cuss social and economic proble
Tickets for the lecture may
tained from members of the co
tee or at the door, at 15 cents
U-NOTICES
All freshmen who expect to
on the business staff of The
call at The Daily offices, betwee
and 3:00 o'clock today.
Installation of the newly eiec
ficers of the Classical club wi
place at the home of Dr. F. W.
from 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock this
noon. All members of the cl
invited to -attend.
Senior enigineers baseball pi
south Ferry field, 4:00 o'cloc
afternoon.
Band members meet at campu
stand, 6:45 o'clock.
11:00 to 12:00 and 2:00 to
o'clock today, tickets on sale fo
versity dance at Packard ac

At a meeting of the combined Glee
and Mandolin clubs held in room 151
of the Chemistry building last night,
plans were discussed for the reorgan-
ization of the club. A motion was pas-
sed. calling for the appointment of a
committee of five, including the pres-
ent president of the clubs ,and for
two representatives from each club,
the duties of the committee to consist
in looking un data and in formulat-
ing plans and perhaps a constitution
to be submitted for the approval or
ratification of the clubs at the next
meeting. The members of the com-
mittee have not yet been appointed.
Just what form the recommendation
of the committee will take is a mat-
ter of conjecture. It is certain thatr
the clubs will be under the general
supervision of a faculty manager next
year.
Suggestions were also heard con-
cerning the basis of membership in
the permanent club. It is probable
that the committee will take action
regarding this matter by returning
its report to the club sitting at a.
whole.

Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Fair, with variable winds.
TODAY
11:00 o'clock-Senior engineer class
assembly, West Physics Lecture hall.
4:30 o'clock-R. B. Wolf speaks on
"The Development of Individuality in
Industry," room. 348, Eng.
6:45 clock-Campus concert at
campus band stand.
8:00 o'clock - John C. Kennedy
speaks on "Socialism, the Fulfillment
of Democracy," under the auspices of
the Intercollegiate Socialist society,
Newberry hall.
9:00 o'clock-Soph Prom, Armory.
TOMORROW
10:00 o'clock-University of Detroit
vs. All-Fresh, baseball game, Ferry
field.
1:45 o'clock-Varsity trock meet,
Ferry field.
3:00 o'clock--Cornell vs. Michigan,
baseball game, Ferry field.
7:00 o'clock-Ferris Institute club
meets, parlors of the Unitarian church.
8:00 o'clock-Cup Debate, Webster
vs. Adelphi House of Representatives,
U-hall.
8:30 o'clock-Union weekly dance,
Barbour gym.
Last day of Taylor Conference on
Scientific Management.

in .corridor of University hal]

.

Newberry

Hear

JOHN

C. KENNEDY

TONIGHT

Hall

on

Admi

.M

Socialism,

"The Fulfillment of Democracy"

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