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May 11, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-11

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NI (111,'lTHEWORLID AiND
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''ClUtRAltISERVICE Y Sf IHE
NI,44 STORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 154.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 11, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

_ _._. __ f _ _

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___. ____ f ---- ----------- ._.,_._.____.__

K(ALAM AZOO HODSl
VARSITY I TO IIN
PITCHERS BATTL
MILLER AND 0) COOIINGiAM FAIL
TO rYvE BASE ON BALLS
I)URING %A ME
GAME GOES FOR 14 INNINGS
Promising ichigan I lly in Last of
Fourteenth Nipped
in Bud
With Miller and Cookingham pitch-
ing air-tight baseball every step of
the way, Michigan and Kalamazoo
battled to a 14-inning draw yesterday
afternoon. Each team scored once.
The contest was essentially a battle
between the two flingers and both
moundsmen were toiling in faultless
fashion. Miller struck out 14, and his
opponent disposed of a like number
in like fashion. Neither man issued a
single base on balls all afternoon-a
remarkable record in itself-and Mil-
ler held the Kalamazoo aggregation
to six hits. He had a slight edge on
the visiting southpaw in this phase of
the controversy, for Michigan secured
seven safeties during the course of the
fray.
Michigan had an excellent chance
to win in the last half of the four-
'teenth, but Walterhouse apparently
changed his mind at the wrong time
or did something of a like nature,
for he was a ridiculously easy victim
at the plate and Michigan's chances of
a victory were tossed to the winds.
With one out in that inning, Walter-
ouse rolled one down the third base
line which the guardian of that sta-
tion threw badly to first, and the
Michigan shortstop romped to secnd.
Labadie's out failed to advance the
runner but he reached third when the
first blaseman dropped a throw on
Brandell. With two gone, and Caswell
up, Walterhouse dashed for the plate,
but slipped some ten feet from home
and while he was deciding just what
the next move would .be, "Red" Mullin
slapped the ball on him and every-
one startdtl home to a dinner which
was already 45 minutes late.
The high wind troubled the fielders
several times during the game, but it
did not materially affect the result.
Michigan's tally came in the seventh
on Labadie's single, Brandell's sac-
rifice and Thomas' safe poke to left.
The visitor's run was unearned. Ol-
sen's hit to right went for a double
when "Bill" Niemann made a futile pass
at the ball with one hand as it rolled
by on the ground. The runner reached
third when a strike eluded "Morrie"
Dunne, and he scored on Caswell's
(Continued on Page Six)
VOTE ON CONSTITUTION OF
ORATORICl. ASSOCIATION,
"Prov~ides for Broaider-IlRepresetation
on 13ort; Power Vested in
Execiti'e Committee
According to the proposed consti-
tution of the Oratorical Association,
which will be voted upon at a gen-
eral meeting of the association at
4:00 o'clock this afternoon in room>

302, N. W., women delegates from theI
literary classes and delegates from
the engineering classes will be ad-
mitted to the Oratorical board.
The division of the legislative and
executive functions of the association
is also provided. The legislative pow-
er will be vested in the Oratorical
board. The board will be composed
of one man and one woman from each
literary class, one delegate from each
engineering class, from each law class,
the four debating society delegates,
the professors and instructors of ora-
tory, and the four student oflicers of
the association, who are elected by
the student body at large.
The executive committee will con-
sist of the president and secretary of
the association, two student members
elected by the Oratorical board, and a
new faculty officer, called the financial
manager, who will have charge of all
expenditures authorized by the board.
Another new officer will be the contestI

I

Tr:angle to Get
Good Scrubbing
Ne' hye ill k1(. niOveralls to Appeair ht
Archi, Itasy at the Task of
Io I it... hing' 'I-hit igles
As the sooty denizens of the north-
east corner of the campus, the jaun-
ty and slothful lits and the begoggled
laws pass through the cave of the
winds under the engineering building
tomorrow afternoon they will notice,
if they have keen eyes, several per-
sons laboring away at a task that
equals the works of the great Hercules.
Whence come these workers of dark
hue, and why is it that they perform
these deeds of cleanliness? They are
the new initiates to Triangles, junior
engineering honorary society, and
what they are doing is polishing the
triangles on the floor of the Engineer-
ing arch.
Then they stand through weary hours,
clustered, never moving, within the
bounds of the disciplinary triangle.
TAYLOR MEN BEGIN
MEEITINGS TODAY

MAY ESTABLISH
NEW DEPARTMENT

Riitored That Course in
gineering ill
iven

Military En-
Be

henry P. Kendall Gives'

First LectureI

on Scientific Management
tonight
HUTCHINS WELCOMES SOCIETY
For the second time in four year
the Taylor society will hold a con-
ference on scientific management,
when it opens its sessions here at
3:30 o'clock this afternoon. It will be
officially opened by President Harry B.
Hutchins with an address of welcome,
in room 348 of the Engineering build-
ing.
The response for the Taylor society
will be given by Harlow S. Person,
president, after which an informal re-
ception will be held. At 8:00 o'clock
this evening, Henry P. Kendall, treas-
urer of the Plimpton Press, of Nor-
wood, Mass., will deliver a lecture on
"Scientific Management: Its Nature
and Significance." This lecture will
take place in room 348 of the Engi-
neering building. After the evening
address, the members of the society
and the faculty will be entertained at
an informal reception at the Univer-
sity club.
Three lectures will be given tomor-
row. Six discussion sections, which
will occur simultaneously at 10:00
o'clock, will be held in the Engineer-
ing building.
SMITH OUTLINES PRESS WORK
Michigan Manager of U. P. Tells Jour-
nalist Students About Organization
The modern press association, with
special reference to the United Press,
its organization, means of gathering
news and distributing it, formed the
subsince of the talk given by S. D. R.
Smith, Michigan manager of the United
lress, to the classes in journalism in
N (st_ hall Wednesday afternoon.
Mr. Smith outlined the organization
of the association and told of the
nmany and various means of obtaining
nevws from its numerous correspon-
dents throughout the United States and
Europe. He explained that in its strue-
tare the association was similar to
that of a daily newspa'per, operated
on a larger scale.
TO WEIGH IN FOR TUG-OF-WAR
Student Council Chairmen to Meet at
l'nion at :I:00 o'Clock Today
"Weighing in" for the three different
class tug-of-war teams who will meet
on the Huron Friday afternoon, May
19, will start ,tomorrow. Just where
the weighing will take place will be
settled at a meeting of the Spring
Games chairmen of the Student Coun-
cil at the Union at 5:00 o'clock today.-
Civic Association Elects Officers
At a meeting of the board of di-
rectors of the Civic association held
recently the following. officers for the
ensuing year were elected: President,
Harry B .Douglas; vice-president,a
Theron S. Langford; treasurer, Ed-,

,E1G E NTS MAY CONSIDER PLAN
he:msfor the establishment of a
department of military engineering
in connection with the College of E-
ginering and Architecture are }being
comlemplated, according to a rumor
in the Engineering school.
It is believed that this matter will
come up for consideration at the next
meeting of the Regents, to be held on
May 19.
Sch a department would be put on
the same basis as the present depart-
ments of the college, civil, mechani-
cal, electrical, chemical and marine.
The men of any one of these depart-
ments would probably be at liberty
to take the 16 hours of special work
which such a department would un-
doubtedly require. The degree con-
ferred for this course would be that
of Bachelor of Military Engineering.
According to a report from Detroit,
Regent Harry Bulkley is attempting
to interest capitalists in that city in
the raising of a fund of $100,000 to
be used in the erection of an armory
in Cat Hole, near the university shops
and storehouse. If this amount is
raised, the $125,000 equipment fund
which the government has promised
the university becomes available.
If the new department in the En-
gineering college is formed, and the
armory built, an effort will probably
be made to co-ordinate and co-operate.
the military engineering department,
the armory, \the recently established
chair of military science, and the drill
battalions.
INLANDER TRY-OUTS TO MENT
Fifteen Mien and Women to 'Take Trialsi
Today at Press Building
Fifteen men and women appeared
yesterday to try out for positions on
the staff of the Inlander for the year
1916-17. It is expected that several
more will be added to the number.
All tryouts are asked to meet Waldo'
R. Hunt at 1:00 o'clock this afternoon'
in the Press building, in order that
work might be given them with which
to estimate their qualifications for the
positions. Each will be required to
submit an editorial on some topic of'
importance to the campus, as well as
one or more specimens of their work.
They will be asked to criticise certain
compositions to test their ability to
serve on either the board of associate
or literary editors.
E, DENBY TO ADDRSS ,
COSMOPOLITAN BNQUT
Pres. HIutchins and Prof. Hildner Also
to Speak at Annual Affair 'in
Barbour Gym Friday
Ex-Congressman Edwin Denby, '96L,
president of the Detroit Board of Com-
merce, will be the principal speaker
at the 10th annual banquet of the
local chapter of the Cosmopolitan club
to be held at 8:00 o'clock tomorrow
evening in Barbour gymnasium. Pres.
Harry B. Hutchins, Prof. J. A. C. Hild-
ner, and Frank Olmstead, '16, the
newly elected president of the club,
will also appear on the program. Wil-
liam Robertson, '16D, the retiring
president, will act as toastmaster for
the evening.

Aloree! Appears
Mystic Caravan
Sphinxes Will Mmmify Members of
Sopb Lit Class at Initiation
To-ay
Trusty worshipers of Sphinx will
descend today from their hpme far up
the river Nile and for one day will
remain among the inhabitants of Ann
Arbor. On their return they will take
with them those members of the pres-
ent sophomore lit class, chosen as
most fit to guard the serets of the
pyramids for"one year. The neophytes
will be taken back over the burning
sands, through the pillars of Rameses
TI and finally permitted to bow before
the sun-kissed side of the great pyra-
mid of Cheops. On reaching the home
of the Sphinxes, the neophytes will
be mummified and will then be ad-
mitted to the secrets and lore of the
mien from Egypt. Oh mortal man,
await the coming of the caravan!
Aloree!"
GAYLE SPEAKS TO
PHI BETA KAPPA
Author of "Yellow and Blue" Educat-
ed in England and at Michigan;
Prominent Author
OVER 125 MEMBERS EXPECTED
Charles Mills Gayley, author of the
"Yellow and the Blue,".and professor
at the University of California, will
be the main speaker at the Phi Beta
Kappa initiation banquet to be held
this evening at 6:30 o'clock in Bar-'
bour gymnasium.
More than 125 members, including
the 36 initiates, are expected to at-
tend. Professor W. W. Beman, of
mathematics department, will be the
official faculty representative.
Professor Gayley was born in Shang-
hai, China, in 1858, received his early
education in England, and later came
to Michigan, where he received his de-
gree of A. B. in 1878. From 1880 to
1889 he was a member of the faculty
here, teaching Latin and English. In
1889 he went to the University of Cali-
fornia as a professor of English.
Professor Gayley has attained prom-
inence as an author, writing numer-
ous literary criticisms and text-books
on rhetoric. In many of his works he
has collaborated with Professor F. N.
Scott.
SOPH PROM PLANS COMPLETED
Programs to 'Take Form of Leather
Card Cases Stamped with "1918"
Everything is in readiness for the
Soph Prom to be held tomorrow night
from 9:00 till 1:00 o'clock in the Ar-
mory. Music will be furnished by the
Wright orchestra of Columbus, Ohio,
which played at the J-Hop. The pro-
grams, which come from the Wright
company. of Philadelphia, will be in
the form of leather card cases with
"1918" on the outside.
Decorations are to be of lattice-
work with vines and flowers to typify
Spring, and the class colors,, red and
white, will constitute the color scheme
The chaperones will be Dean J. R-.
Effinger and Mrs. Effinger, Prof. C. H.
Cooley and Mrs. Cooley, and Assistant
Dean W. H. Butts and Mrs. Butts.

BANKING MEN 6O TO DETROIT
National City Bank of New York Train-
ing School Candidates to Be Picked
Professor Geo. W. Dowrie stated yes-
terday that the five men who were
picked by the university to compete
for the fellowships given by the Na-
tional City Bank of New York, are
to go to Detroit on Friday of this
week to confer with Vice-President
Kies of the bank.
No names have been given out up to
the present of the men, but after the
conference on Friday, the names of
the man or men who are chosen by Mr.
Kies will be published.
According to the terms of agree-
ment with the bank, only one man
is sure of being chosen, but indica-
tions are that two or three of the men
may be. picked to enter the training

Jttichigamua Adds
9 Nelv JMembers
All-Campus Honorary Society Held
Second Spring Initiation and
Banquet Last Night
Michigamua, all-campus honorary
society, held its second spring initia-
tion and banquet last night. The men
who were taken in are: Elmer Bran-
dell, '16, Verne E. Burnett, '17, Grant
L. Cook, '17L, Howard A. Donnelly,
'17, Glenn A. Howland, '17L, Robert
L. McNamee, '17E, Walter A. Niemann,
'17, Harold E. O'Brien, '17, and James
L. Whalen, '17E'
Change .in Itour of Union Dance
H. Kirk White, '17, Jos. Palma, '18,
and Stanley Smith, '17, have been
placed on the committee in charge of
this week's Union dance to be held
Saturday night in Barbour gymnas-
ium. Attention is called to the
change in the hours, dancing being
from 8:30 to 11 :30 o'clock. Tickets
will go on sale at the Union desk at
5:00 o'clock this afternoon. Mr. J. J.
Goodyear and Mrs. Goodyear will act
as chaperones.
Final Cup Debate Comes May 13
Saturday night, May 13, has been
set as the date of the final Cup Debate
between the teams of the Webster and
Adelphi House of Representatives de-
bating societies. The date has been
changed several times. The contest
will take place in University hall.
WHAT'S GOING N -
Weather forecast for A a rbor and
vicinity: Fair and cooler.
TO_)AY
3:30 o'clock-President Harry B.
Hutchins opens the conference of the
Taylor society on scientific manage-
ment, room 348, Engineering building.
4:00 o'clock-Fi'esh lit vs. senior lit,
baseball.
4:15 o'clock-Election of officers,
Equal Suffrage association, Newberry
residence.
6:30 o'clock--Phi Beta Kappa ban-
quet, Barbour gym.
6:30 o'coc-Jewish Student Con-
gregation holds important business
meeting, Newberry hal.
7:00 o'clock-Meeting of Wrestlers'
club, Alpha Nu rooms.
7:00 o'clock--Meeting of Glee and
Mandolin clubs, room 151, Chemistry
building.
7:30 o'clock-Poetry club meets, Cer-
cle Francais room, 202 South Wing.
7:30 o'clock-International Polity
club meets, Michigan Union.
7:30 o'clock--Girls' Lower Section of
the Deutscher Verein meets, Verein
rooms.
8:00 o'cock-Men's section of the
Deutscher Verein meets, Verein rooms.
TlOMORRO W
Continuation of conference of Tay-
lor society on scientific management.
6:45 o'clock-Campus concert at
campus band stand.
8:00 o'clock - John C. Kennedy
speaks on "Socialism, the Fulfillment
of Democracy," under the auspices of
the Intercollegiate Socialist society,;
Newberry hall.
U-NOTICES
All freshmen who expect to work
on the business staff of The Daily
next year are requested to call at the
Daily office, Press building, Maynard
street, between 1:00 and 3:00 P. M.
Friday or Saturday of this week.

Phi Beta Kappa keys will be distrib-
uted today in room 109, Tappan hall,
between the hours of 11:30 and 12:15
o'clock.;
J-llt baseball practice today, 3:30
o'clock, Ferry field.
Senior hits and fresh lits will play
the game today that was postponed
from last Tuesaay.
Fresh lit baseball practice, south
Ferry field, at 3:30 o'clock. ,
There will be an important meeting
of the Student Council at its rooms in

SPECILATION RIFE AS TO WIIAT
()I''OME OF MOVE
?1A BE
NO SCOTT-OREGON MEETING
V. S. General Remains In El Paso for
3lexican Leader, Who Fails
to Appear
El Paso, May 10.-All Americans in
Mexico have once more been warned
out. With the army backing up -to
the border in Mexico, all Americans
ordered to leave the country, and with
10,000 new troops coming to re-enforce
those in, Mexico or on the border,
there was considerable speculation to-
day over what the outcome would be.
Many were inclined to look upon the
matter in the light that the United
States had reached a definite decision
not to come out of Mexico with its
forces, until it is good and ready and
all these are but preliminary steps
to meet and checkmate any move the
de facto government of that country
may attempt.
Consul P. D. Edwards at Juarez re-
ceived a message this afternoon from
the state department at Washington
to order all Americans in his district
to leave Mexico at once. He gave the
information to the newspapers and
correspondents as official. It came
simultaneously with knowledge of the
fact that General Pershing has been
told to fall back toward the border
with his forces now in Mexico, in o-
der to shorten up his line of communi-
cation and put him closer to the Amer-
ican border and the re-enforcements
of regulars and militia called out yes-
terday.
Today was another holiday in
Juarez. It was the fifth anniversary
of the capture of the town from Diaz
forces by the rebel army of Orozco
and Madero, and General Obregon,
minister of war remained on his side'
of the river all day with the celebrat-
ing people.
General Scott stuck close to his car
in El Paso expecting a conference with
Obregon, but as the day wore on
none came and General Obregon an-
nounced that he was awaiting advices
from Mexico City. When 5 o'clock
came and the advices 'had not arrived
it was stated at Obregon's car that
there would be no meeting today.
Earlier in the day General Scott had
said there would be another confer-
ence today regardless of whether he
and Obregon received advices from
their respective governments. Gen-
eral Funston remained here during
the day to be with General Scott, al-
though he thought he might depart
for San Antonio at any time. Neither
(Continued on Page Six)
0ANOMEN TO GIVE FIRST
CAMPUS CONCERT FIDAY
Will Render Several New Seleclions;
To Appear Often Before
Close of School
Another Michigan tradition will be
rehabilitated tomorrow evening when
the Varsity band gives the first open
air concert of the season in the cam-
pus band stand.
Captain Wilson promises a real
treat in this initial appearance, the
band having a number of selections
which will be rendered for the first
time. The entire program has not
been chosen as yet but will .be pub-
lished tomorrow.-
In addition to these weekly con-

certs the musicians will appear' many
more times before the end of the year.
Following are the scheduled turnouts:
Friday, May 19, Campus concert;
Saturday, May -20, baseball game and
track meet; Friday, June 2, baseball
game; Friday, June 2, Cap Night cere-
monies; Saturday, June 3, interscho-
lastic meet and baseball game; Fri-
day, June 9, baseball game; Friday,
June 9, campus ' concert; Saturday,
June 10, baseball game; friday, June
23, campus concert; Wednesday, June

ALL AMERICAN~S ONCE MORE WARNED
OUT OF MEXICO; PERSHING OfiDERED
TO SHORTEN COMMUNICATION LINE

TO HOLD ANNUAL STRAW
DAY CELEBRATION ON

H.,:vr
MAY 1s

Straw -at Day will be celebrated
on Wednesday, May 17, the strength
and universalism of the said celebra-
tion depending to some extent upon the
dictates of General Weather.
The straws this season are to be
most unique. While the high crown
and decorative ribbons will predomi-
nate as of yore, something new is
promised in the "Torpedo" hat and

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