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May 09, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-09

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TJ.'E DAILY
<)Oc
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS
VOL. XXVI. No. 152.

J i . OP.
i
y J-23erg
AN

I'llones :--Editorial 1241
Blusines 1) 6
NEW YORK SUN

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 9, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CE

OBREGON FALS d Open Opera FCI
Seenario Contest
RACH GREEMENT I :Uu Bht 1'So Submitted ilast Night
IAIITIr er ijieedyUTTno

-- -

I ____ _ . __

NCY MEN
CONFERENCE
3-A iIIoilnes '. 11'4?- )I
ain Starling on
Thursday
I) TABLE SESSIONS

I

Kaiser to Confer
with Von Buelolv

Tr3Ien-e Reasons Advanced for Trip
Prince to Consultation
Withi Emperor

GERMANY'S REPLYI ACCEPTABLE[
TO WILSON; NEW NOTE REJECTS
BRITISH BLOCKADE PROPOSITI[
--

of

VNFIRIENCE BETWEEN MEXICAN
AND AMERICAN GENERALS
WITHOUT RESULT
ANOTHER MEETING TUESDAY
The Latest Dlevelopments in the "Big
11omtd" Raid Have Entered
Into Negotiations
El Paso, May 8.-General Scott and
General Obregon failed to reach an
agreement at their conference tonight,
according to Juan T. Amador, sub-
secretary of foreign affairs, who went
with General Obregon to General
Scott's car and participated in the con-
ference.
The conference lasted more than an
hour, during which time copies of the
agreement were read by the American
and Mexican generas, but, so far as
could be seen through the windows of
the private car, no signatures were
affixed to the agreement.
At times General Obregon would
stand up and pound the table, as if em-
phasizing his point, and this led to
the belief that a disagreement ha"
arisen over the points that he made,
but this was not confirmed by any-
thing said by the conferees. At the
conclusion of the conference, General
Scott sent word to newspaper men that
he had no statement to make at this
time. After the conference, General
Obregon, in Juarez, said the negotia-
tions were just beginning. Later Gen-
eral Obregon issued the following
statement:
"The conference tonight was very
satisfactory. Another meeting will
probably occur tomorrow."
It is known that the latest develop-
ments in the situation in the "Big
Bend" raid have entered into the ne-
gotiations, which, except for this,
would havebeen concluded'yesterday.
General Scott admitted yesterday that
this incident would have weight in
the conference and Mexican officials
tonight admitted that it complicated
affairs- and expressed the belief that
the raid was engineered by enemies
of the Carranza -government at this
particular time, because of the effect
it would have on the conference.
General Funston said tonight that
he had no intention of sending re-en-
forcements to the American cavary
troops already in the Big Bend country
to hunt down the bandits who raided
that section Friday night and Satur-
day, for the reason that he had
not any more troops to send.
This means that, if the chase in
Coahuila should become as extended
as the chase under General Pershing
in Chihuahua has been, General Fun-
ston would have to call for the militia
of the various states to act as a bor-
der guard before he could summon
any more troops to his assistance. Five
troops of American cavalry is all he
now has on the chase, two of the
Eighth cavalry from El Paso. and
three of the Fourteenth.
DR, HEWLETT ACCEPTS OFFER
Director of Clinic Laboratory Goes to
Leland Stanford Next Fall
Dr. A. A. hewlett, professor of in-
ternal medicine and director of the
clinic laboratory in the department of
medicine and surgery, has accepted
an offer from Leland Stanford uni-
versity as professor of internal medi-
cine and neurology, to take effect next
fall. Dr. Hewlett has been in charge1
of the clinic laboratory for seven years
and his absence will be keenly felt.
Dr. Neil Foster, of Cornell, has been

secured to take his place.
SHOW RELATION OF LIGHT TO
EXPRESSION IN PIOTOGRAPRY
An experiment, showing the rela-
tion of lighting to facial expression in
photography, has just been completed
in the department of electrical en-
gineering. According to the printed
photographs, about 20 of which have
been made with the statue of an old
man as the subject, it is possible to
give the face the appearance of almost
any age or any expression with the1
use of lights in certain positions andl

At a meeting of the Union opera
committee held at. the Union last
night all but two of the scenarios
submitted were eliminated. Compe-
tition, however, will still be open this
week, since the final selection will
be made at another meeting of the
committee to be held at the Union
Saturday, May 13, at 10:00 o'clock.
Those who have scenarios that have
not been submitted to the committee
are urged to do so. The committee
is also willing to give ten minutes to
scenario writers who want to discuss
their plots at the meeting Saturday.
This includes those who have entered.
in either of the competitions.
Smith to Lecture
on United Press
.ltchi an Representati-e of U. P. to
'Calk to Journalism
(lasses Wednesday
S. D. R. Smith, Michigan manager
of the United Press, will address the
classes in journalism Wednesday. Mr.
Smith has not announced his subject,
but it will deal with some of the l1rob-
les presented to the organization in
gathering and dispensing its news to
the various papers of the country. The
lecture will be given at 4:00 o'clock
in room 202 West hall, and will be
open to all persons interested in the
subject.
4 Typhoid Cases
Reported in City
Three High School Students Contract
Disease from Well
Water
Three high school students, Paul
Kempf, Edith Stoebler, and Mary Per-'
kins, and one other person, have been
stricken with typhoid fever, as a result
of the bad condition of a number of
wells in the city from which drinking'
water has, until very recently, beenI
drawn. Dr. John Wessinger, city
health officer, gave out the statement
that the water from these wells is
directly responsible for the several
cases of typhoid which have recently1
been reported. The wells thus far
investigated and condemned are lo-
cated at 619 Detroit street, 525 Lib-
erty street, 558 S. Fifth street, and
one in the rural district.
Pharmics Susp end
School on Friday

P0CJ&'t

11

r
PLAN ROUNI

Final arrangements for the confer-
cuce of the Taylor society on scientific
nanauL ein e3t to be held Thursday, 1ri-
day and Saturday, have been com-
pletd, and the program given cut.
The development of the science of
nmanagement from its infancy to the
present cay will be illustrated in lec-
tures and round table discussions in
which prominent business men and
manufacturers will take part.
The complete program follows:
TIlURSDAY, 3IAY h
3:00 e 'clock, afternoon : Addresses
of welcome, President"larr" B. Hutch-
ins. Response for the Taylor society.
Parlow S. Person, president. Infora-
al reception.
8:00 o'clock. evening: "Scientific
Managempnt; Its Nature and, Signifi-
cance," by Henry P. Kendall, treasur-
er of the Plimpton Press, of Norwood,
Mass.
FRIDAY, MAY 12
.:00 'o'clock, afternoon: Address
Prof. H. C. Adams, of the economics
department. Lecture on "Scientific
Methods of Management Applied to
Various Types of Industry," by San-
ford E. Thompson, consulting engi-
neer, Boston, Mass.
10:00 o'clock Round table discus-
sions of scientific methods of manage-
ment applied to various types of in-
dustry.
Discussion A. ' ype 1. Continuous
processes; ufiform product with uni-
form specifications; single purpose
machines; uniform operations; sim-
ple routing. Chairman, D. L. Quirk,
president of the Peninsular Paper
company, of Ypsilanti. Paper and pulp:
Leaders, Keppele Hall, Eastern Mfg.
Co., Bangor, Me., and Robert B. Wolf,
manager of manufacturing, Burgess
Sulphite Fibre Co., Berlin, N. H.'
Textiles: Leader, 81. V. R. Scheel,
Brighton Mills, Passaic, N. J.
DiscussionI B. Type 2. Non-con-
tinuous processes; uniform product
with varying specifications; single
purpose machines; varying operations;
complex routing. Chairman, Earl D.
Howard, of Hart, Schaffner & Marx
(Continued on Page Five)
MISS LEONORA ALLEN ENGAGED
Ann Arbor Soprano to -arry Al-
bert Lindquestf
Miss Leonora Allen, the popular
young soprano, of Ann Arbor, will be-
come the bride next month of Albert
Lindquest, the well known Chicago
tenor.
Miss Allen, who formerly was a
member of the School of Music fac-
ulty, has sung in this city upon sev-

London, May 8.-Prince Bernhard
von Buelow, the former imperial Ger-
man chancellor, tonight looms large
on the political horizon of Europe.
The only man living who has ever
dared to extort from his imperial mas-
ter a pledge of greater discretion in
the discussion and conduct of the Ger-
man empire affairs, is now speeding in
a special train toward the great gen-
eral army headquarters in the field, in
response to a hurry call from the
Kaiser, who has bidden him, it is re-
ported, to a personal interview of "ex-
treme importance." The prince has
been spending the greater part of the
last year in Switzerland.
Three theories are advanced in well
informed circles here tonight with
reference to the possible purpose of
the conference between the Kaiser and
tine hero of the famous crises of 1908.
T1 are:
That Prince von Buelow is to take
over the governmental reins of the
ei;rc by reassuming his former of-
(Continued on Page Six)
Faculty Cited in
Philippine Break
Congressman Beakes Blames Michigan
Professors for Split With
Democratie Caucus
Opinions as expressed by various
Michigan professors were cited by
Congressman Samuel W. Beakes, of
Michigan, as responsible tor his break
with the Democratic caucus agree-
ment, in the recent vote in the house
on the Clarke amendment to give the
Philippines their independence. Among
others, he referred to former Philip-
pine Commissioner Dean C. Worces-
ter, who spent a number of years in
the islands studying local conditions.
Congressman Beakes was one or 28
Wilson Democrats who jumped the
traces and voted with the Republican
minority on the Philippine question.
HURON DANGER POINTS
HAVE BEENCLEARED UP
Boat 'lub Anounces All Stumps,
logs and Obstructions Nbw
IRemoved
Beginning this week, the Huron riv-
er will be as safe as any ordinary pre-
cautionary measures can make it, ac-
cording to announcement made last
night by members of the University
Boat club. The process of removing
stumps, logs and other obstructions
which has been under way for some
time has been completed, and the

* * * * *
IRISH REVOLT EXECUTEI)
FONR MORE 1EADEIIS IN
London, May 8.-Four more
of the leaders in the Irish revolt
were executed, according to an
official statement issued to-
night. They were Cornelius Col-
bert, Edmund Kent, Michael Mal-
lon, and J. J. Hueston.
*~ * * *- * *~ * * * * *

*
x:
*:
*.
*
*
*

MOTHERS' DAY TO BE
OBSERVED__ON MAY 14
Gov. Ferris Sek Ths)isPate for Re-
membrance of the "Mothers
of our Country"
Mothers' Day will be observed in
the state of Michigan on Sunday, May
14, in accordance with a proclamation
just issued by _Governor Ferris.
The proclamation contains a fine
tribute to the modern mother and
urges the observance of this day as
an appreciation of the debt which the
country owes her.
"The mothers of every country are
more important than the armies and
the munitions of war," says the proc-
lamation, and the governor advises
"the boys and girls and 'grown-ups'"
to express their gratitude by writing
some "mother" a letter of appreciation.
In concluding the instrument, the
governor, in obedience to a resolution
passed by Congress, requests the peo-
ple of Michigan to display the United
States flag on "Mothers' Day" on all.
government and public buildings, at
their homes or other suitable places
"as a public expression of their love
and reverence f(r the mothers of our
country."-
Pink and white carnations will also
be worn next Sunday, the pink ones
by those whose mothers are living
and white .ones by those whose moth-
ers are dead.
Be"in 'aims New Gain at Verd""n
Berlin, by wireless, May 8.-In the
recent fighting on the Verdun front,
the Germans captured an entire sys-
tem of trenches on the northern slope
of Hill No. 304, the war office an-
nounced today.
Hobart Guild to Elect Officers ionliglit
Hobart Guild will hold its annual
election of officers in Harris hall at
7:30 o'clock this evening. The meet-
ing will be followed by an informal
dance.
WHAPS GOING ON

SA N SiNG DECLARES GERMANY'S
ANS ER YJEL S REGA RD-
ING MERCHANT SHIPS
BRYAN POLIY KOW USELESS
Peace Trealies of Former Secretary
of State Would not Avail in
Present Conditions
washington, May 8.-President Wil-
so today sent a note to the German
government accepting its declaration
of abandonment of illegal submarine
warfare and rejecting thersuggestion
that the United States regard this
abandonment as conditional upon
Great Britain's action with respect to
the blockade.
The note is courteous in tone but
firm and definite. It is intended to
remove all doubt on the part of the
imperial government as to the posi-
tion the United States has taken.
Secretary Lansing tonight issued
the following statement explaining
why the United states cannot discuss
matters pertaining to the relations be-
tween this government and Great
Britain with the imperial govern-
ment.
"The greatef- part 'of the German
answer is devoted to matters which
this government cannot discuss with
the German government. The only
questions of right which can be dis-
cussed with that government, are
these questions which are the sub-
ject of diplomatic exchanges between
the United States and other coun-
tries.
"The -essence of the answer is that
Germany yields to our representations
with regard to the right of merchant
ships and non-combatants on the high
seas and engages to observe the rec-
ognized rule of international law gov-
erning naval warfare in-using her
submarines against merchant ships,
So long as she lives up to this altered
policy we have no reason to quarre
with her on that score, though the
losses resulting from the violation of
American rights by German subma-
rine commanders operating under the
former policy, will have to be settled.
"While our differences with Great
Britain cannot form a subject of dis-
cussion with Germany. it should be
stated that in our dealing with the
British government we are acting as
we are unquestionably bound to act
in view of the explicit treaty engage-
ments with that government. We
have treaty obligations as to the man-
ner in which matters in dispute be-
tween the tWo governments are to be
handled. We offered to assume mu-
tually similar obligations with Ger-
many, but the offer was declined.
"When, however, the subject in dis-
pute is continuing a menace to Amer-
ican lives, it is doubtful whether such
obligations apply unless the menace
is fremoved during the pendency of
the proceedings."
Refers to Bryan Treaties
Secretary Lansing's statement, re-
fers for the first time in the subma-
rine negotiations to' the Bryan peace
treaties and indicates that, even if
such a treaty were in force with Ger-
(Continued on Page Six)

Students
Visit

in This Department
lDeroit ianuacturing
Plants

to

eral occasions.,

She also appeared as channel is now entirely cleared of all

Classes will be suspended Friday,
May 12, in the College of Pharmacy in
order that the entire faculty and stu-
dent body may be able to make a trip
of inspection to two big Detroit man-
ifacturing plants on that day. -
Leaving on the Michigan Central
at 7:00 o'clock in the morning, the
party will first visit the Ford Motor
company. In the afternoon the firm
of Frederick Stearns & Co., manufac-
turing pharmacists, will be visited.
At the latter plant, the party will be
entertained with a luncheon and ban-
quet.
Every student in the College of
Pharmacy is extected to make the
trip, attendance at which is compul-
sory
PILES. HUTCHINS TO SPEAK AT
COSMOPOLITAN CLITB BANQUE'l
President Harry B. Hutchins will
deliver one of the main speeches at7
the annual banquet of the Cosmopoli-
tan club to be held in Barbour gym-
nasium on Friday evening. Ex-Con-
gressman Edwin Denby, of Detroit,
president of the board of trade of
that city, will also speak.
Senate Council Holds Meeting
Routine business was transacted at
the meeting of the Senate Council held
Monday afternoon in the office of Pres-

soloist at the 1915 May Festival. Dur- rubbish likely to endanger the lives of
ing the past season she has been canoeists. The old dam has been cut
traveling as soloist with the Minneapo- through, which releases a head of
lis Symphony Orchestra. water long recognized as a potential
Mr. Lindquest is also well known in menace.
Ann Arbor, having appeared here sev- To date eight safety stations have
eral times, the last time as soloist been installed. Donations are being
with the New York Philharmonic Or- received nearly every day, and as fast
chestra. He studied for about a year as the material arrives the shelters
at the University School of Music, aft- are being built and placed in position.
er which he toured as soloist with sev- The latest additions to the list of do-
eral large symphony orchestras. nors are the Senior society and the

MEDIC FACULTY AT CAPITAL
Eight Michigan Professors Attend
C'ongress of Physicians
The University of Michigan is being
well represented in Washington this
week, almost the entire medical facul-
ty attending the Congress of Ameri-
can Physicians, which is being held

Wesleyan guild.
Plans are now being worked out for
the regatta to be held June 10. The
work of clearing the river has de-
layed activities, but committees will
be appointed at once to map out the
courses and arrange the schedule of
contests.
CERCLE FR NCAIS SELECTS
NEW OFFICERS AT MEETING

Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity-Fair and cooler with fresh
west winds.
T'ODAY
7:00 o'clock-Adelphi society meets,
room 401 U-hall.
7:00 o'clock-Cosmopolitan Club
will hold its annual election of officers,
meeting, Newberry hall.
7:15 o'clock-Soph Prom committee
meets at Union.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of Hobart
Guild for election of officers, Harris
hall.
7:30- o'clock-Health Service lec-
ture by Dr. Marshall, amphitheatre of
the Medical building.
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock-Mr. S. D. R. Smith
speaks to classes in journalism, 202
West hall.
5:0)0 o'clock-Senior Architects
meet, rooi 312 New Engineering
building.
V-NOTICES
8:00 o'clock, senior lit baseball can-
didates meet, south Ferry field.,
3:00 o'clock, freshman baseball
practice, south Ferry field.
4:00 o'clock, J-engineers baseball

there. Drs. Vaughan, Peterson, War- Members of the Cercle Francais met
thin, Novy, Wile, Barrett, Weller and last night in the Cercle room in South
Huber, Michigan's representatives, will Wing for the purpose of electing of-
deliver talks before the several meet- ficers for 1917. Lloyd Curby, '17L,
ings. was elected president. Marie Corn-
Dr. Vaughan will speak Friday night well, '17, Was elected vice-president.
in Brooklyn as the representative from The office of treasurer went to L. S.
Michigan at the fiftieth anniversary Thompson, '18, and that of secretary
of Dr. Lewis S. Pilcher as a practic- to Mary Kerr, '18. The new officers.
ing physician. Dr. Pilcher received made speeches 'of acceptance in
his doctor's degree from Michigan in French immediately after being
1866. el'ected and a vote of thanks was ex-,
Dr. Cummings of the health service tended to Faculty Director Hari-y V.
will have charge of the class in hy- Wann for his co-operation in the ac-

PROF . J. R. ALLEN IMPROVES
Will Be Able to Conduct Classes With-
In Two Weeks
The condition of Prof. John R. Allen,
of the Engineering college, whose right
eyeball was removed by an operation
Saturday evening following an acci-
dent which occurred at his farm north-
west of the city, is reported to be ex-
cellent.
The patient was taken to his home
at 833 East University avenue Sunday,
and according to Dr. Dean W. Myers,
the physician in charge of the case,
no complications are to be feared. It
is thought that Professor Allen will be
able to return to his classes within
two weeks.
During his absenceNProfessor Allen's
classes are being conducted by Prof.
J. E. Emswiler, Prof. J. H. Rowen and
Prof. W. F. Verner, while his employ-
ment work among senior mechanicals
is being taken care of by Prof. Joseph

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