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October 21, 1915 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-10-21

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THE DAILY
$2.50
NEWS OF THE WORLD ANI
THE CAMPUS

The

1 lgo""ari

Daily

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 15.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1915.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

t

PROSPECT BRIGHT
TFOR CLIAX WEEK
IN UNION CANVASS
2 6 COMMITTEES TO iDECEIVE
Ni l14TLY INFORMATION OF
PROGRESS
CANVASS GETS WDE PUBLICITY
Simultance at oss Meetings on Octo-
ber : 1 Will Bring UniuertAking
to Official Close
Final plans for Concentration Week
have been completed by the national
campaign committee of the Michigan
Union, and instructions are now be-
ing sent to: all local committees con-
cerning the meetings of the final week
of the canvass.
The first meetings will be held in
the 206 cities on Tuesday, October 26,
when the total signed subscriptions
secured by the local committee up to
that time will be wired to the central
offices in Ann Arbor. Night letters
are to be sent out each night during
the final week to all local organiza-
tions announcing the total subscrip-
tions received.
Total subscriptions for the month
will be wired to Ann Arbor at 1:00
o'clock on Saturday of Concentration
Week, and the grand total will be
wired out to all committees in time'
to be read at the simultaneous mass1
meetings on Saturday evening, which
will officially close the $1,000,000 cam-
paign.
This final meeting will be similar
to the one which opened the campaign,
and it is confidently expected byi
everyone connected with the work
that at this time the grand total an-<
nounced will be slightly in excess of
the $1,000,000 needed. In some citiesi
the gatherings will take the form of
-banquets and smokers, while in oth-c
ers yells, moving pictures and
speeches will form the body of the{

Grenades in Load STUDENT COUNCIL TO
Explode; 52 Dead TK CINTWR

--I-

GERMANS SEE HOPE OF VICTORY IN RUPTURE OF ALLIES;
NEW CA PAION PLANS LIFT TEUTONIC, ENTHUSIASM HIGH;
SIR EDWARD CARSON EXPLAINS REASONS FOR RESIGNATION,

French Laborer )rops One While
Loading Auto at factory; Presi-
dent Called Out
Paris, Oct. 20.-Fifty-two persons,
a majority of whom were women, were
killed here this afternoon in an explo-
sion' of a munitions factory on the
Rue de Tolbriac, and 100 or more
were injured.
An auto truck was- being loaded
with the bombs when a workman
dropped one of the grenades, which
immediately exploded and was fol-
lowed by a series of other explosions.
The explosion destroyed all of the
main factory and practically all prop-
erty within a radius of 100 yards,
while damage was done to buildings
within a radius of 500 yards. Of the
41 bodies recovered, 31 are women.
The explosion was followed by fire.
President Poincare, who was in-
formed of the accident, appeared in
person and directed the efforts of the
rescuers. The accident was believed
not to have been the work of spies.
240 SIGN UP IN TWO DAYS OF
UNION MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN
Total of 2,347 Students Now Possess
Membership In Campus
Institution
Great success for the second day of
the Union membership house-to-house
campaign was reported last night by'
the committeemen, with 152 new mem-
bers for yesterday's total. This, to-
gether with Tuesday's number, makes'
240, which is nearly twice as many
as last year's campaign netted. '
The total number of students now
in possession of membership receipts
is 2,347, over 40 per cent of the stu-
dent body. A large number of the
students who were unable to pay the
membership fee promised to do so as
soon as their money came at the first
of next month.
The quality of work done by the
committeemen inP the campaign will
be recognized in making committee9
appointments later in the year. The
men that came through with the best
work yesterday are: J. B. Langs, D.
G. Smith, Dudley McClure, C. K. Pat-
terson and F. M. Sutter.,
On account of the boost in Union
feeling caused by the million-dollar
building campaign a larger member-
ship is expected this year than ever
before. During the house-to-house
campaign nearly every non-member
of the Union has been approached and
as yet there have been no refusals
to join on other grounds than finan-
cial disability.

BOLSTERING UP SPIRIT

Organized
soI

Singing in Addition to Uni-
Cheering at Al. A. C.
GIamne Saturday

WILI, APPEAL TO STUDENTS FOR
DISPLAY OF SPORTSMANSHIP
LETTER TO BE SUBMITTED TO-
NIGHT MAY BE SENT TO STU-
DENT ORGANIZATIONS
J. C. B. Parker
Feeling that it is the duty of the
student council to take the initiative
in building up a more unified Michi-
gan spirit, members of that organiza-
tion will take action at their meeting
tonight. It is their aim to organize
Wolverine rooters to give their team
all the moral support and fighting
spirit that a display of good sports-
manship can produce. In addition to
organized cheering, there will be or-
ganized singing at the M. A. C. game
Saturday. Kenneth Westerman, grad,
has been secured to lead the stands
in songs.
According to T. P. Soddy, '16E, pres-
ident of the student council, a defi-
nite plan of action has been mapped
out. "I understand that a letter has
been drawn up by one of the council-
men to be submitted for approval at
the meeting tomorrow night," said
Soddy yesterday. "This letter will be
worded in the form of an appeal to
the student body, and will point out
the need of showing a proper spirit
during the football games. If passed
on by the council, this letter will
probably be sent out to the fraterni-
ties, societies and house clubs, where
it will be brought before the eyes of
a large percentage of the student
body."
The plan of laying the matter be-
fore the different classes at their
meetings has been followed out,and
many prominent upperclassmen have
been secured to speak upon the elim-
ination of all unsportsnanlike con-
duct from the games.
CLOSE MAJOHiTIES
MARHK ELECTIONS

Gives Up Post Because of Inability
to Agree With Cabinet on
Balkan Question
ILLNESS OF PREMIER ASQUITII
MAY PRODUCE POLITICAL CALM

program.
Daily telegrams containing
subscriptions to date have been
(Continued on Page Six)

total
espe-

MASS METING
PLANS COMPLETE
Prof. R. W. Aigler, W. A. P. John and
"Jim" Watkins to Represent Fac-
silty, Students and Alumni
'hAL" 81ITH TO LEAD CHEERS
Final arranements have been made
for the M. A. C. mass meeting which
will be held at Hill auditorium to-
morrow night. F. F. McKinney, '16L,
will be in charge of the meeting, and
will introduce four speakers to the
crowd.
Prof. R. W. Aigler will represent
the facult- while the student body
will be rcjwesented by W. A. P. John,
'16. "Jim" Watkins, fullback on the
1907 eleven, and a Rhodes scholar, will
come outfrom Detroit to represent
the alumni. The fourth speaker of
the evening will be a prominent man
whose name is being kept under cover
in order that the surprise of hearing
him may add to the meeting.
Captain "Hal" Smith, of the track
team, will be the chief factor in
the production of noise, being the
cheer-leader. The band will also
be present to aid Smith in waking
the spirit of the Michigan followers.
Lyndon will be on deck with some
slides to lend pictorial interest. W.
C. Achi at the piano, atcompanied by
the band, will introduce a new Ha-
waiian-Michigan song which he has
composed.
Neither one of the teams will be at
the meeting, since the M. A. C. team
does not arrive hAre until 10:30
o'clock Saturday morning, coming on
a special train. Coach Yost has de-
cided that he will need his men to-
morrow night for a rule and play
quiz, which will be of more practical
value than the mass meeting.
The tickets for the .seats will be
distributed tomorrow, the men's from
the Union from 10:00 o'clock on, and
the women's from University hall be-
tween 10:00 and 12:00 o'clock and
1:30 and 3:30 o'clock. In the distri-
bution every effort will be made to
(Continued on Page Six)

J-Engineers Pick Patterson,
Seabury and Robertson to
(lass During Year

Walker,
Lead

REPORTED THAT F. E. SMITH
WILL SUCCEED SIR
EDWARD
London, Oct. 20.-Sir Edward Car-
son explaied the reason for his res-
ignation from the cabinet in a state-
ment today before the house of com-
mons. le states as his reason for
giving up the post his failure to agree
with the sentiment of the cabinet on
the Balkan situation. It is reported
in parliamentary circles that F. E.
Smith, the former head of the press
bureau, will succeed Sir Edward Car-
son.
The illness of Premier Asquith will
delay his appearance in the cabinet
for nine or ten days, and this enforced
absence is expected to give time for
the reconciliation of differences. The
premier's illness has had the effect
of producing a greater air of calm
in political circles than would other-
wise have attended the resignation of
Sir Edward Carson from the attor-
ney-generalship.
CVlbinet Unrest May Result Seriously
The resignation of Carson was not
followed by the cabinet shake-up as
was anticipated. The collapse of the
coalition government has been pre-
dicted, however, and it is believed
that Asquith has practically resigned.
It is thought that the unrest in the
cabinet will either be followed by rev-
olution or a rigid national council.
Two facts were brought out by
questions arising in the cabinet today.
One was that the officers in charge
of the forces at Soplab do not hold
command any longer and will be re-
placed. Second, that the Zeppelin
raid will not interfere with Britain's
plans for a siege on Germany by her
aircraft.
ORATORS OF UNIVERSITY
PREPARINGFOB CONTEST
Speakers to Report by December 4;
Initial Competition Starts Two
Weeks Later
"Several of the best orators in the
university are preparing for the uni-
versity peace contest, December 17,"
says a member of the oratory faculty.
"In the past four years Michigan has
carried off the first national honors
twice, and nearly repeated the feat
last year."
All contestants in the local contest
will report on or before December 4,
and appear in the initial competition
dated for December 17. The Wolver-
ine winner will battle men from other
state colleges at Albion several weeks
later. The victor in the state meet
will then compete in the central
northern division of the United States,
which is divided into six parts for the
national contest. The winner in this
section of the country will appear
next spring at Lake Mohonk, the ren-
dezvous of American peace advocates,
to court the national honors.
No prizes are given, as a rule, at
the local match, but awards of $75
and $50 are delivered to the first and
second winners at the state meet.
Prizes of about the same value are
apportioned at the interstate meet,
and at the Mohonk affair larger prizes
are given out, and here each partici-
pant receives one.
Competition is open to all students
excepting freshmen. Percival Blan-
shard, ex-'15, and his brother, Paul
Blanshard, '15, both won first in the

national meet, and last year N. E.
Pinney, '16, placed in the finals. Com-
petitors can speak for or against any
phase of peace, as preparedness, ar-
bitration, and the like-questions
which are of vital interest because of
the European crisis.

WILSON TO ASSIST C'ARRANZA
AANST ARMED OPPOSITION
Villa's Forces Dwindling Fast; Em-
barge on Arms to be Reinforced
by Proclamation
Washington, Oct. 20.-President
Wilson stated today that he will take
active steps to assist Carranza in op-
posing all armed opposition he may
encounter. The first step 'will be a
proclamation reinforcing the embargo
of arms. It is thought that the forces
of Villa will soon dwindle to nothing.
As a result of the recognition of Car-
ranza many of the former's forces
have already disbanded.
GEORGEHAEN PUTNAM
TO MAKE DEBUT HERE
AS SPEAKER TONIGHT
Veteran of Civil War to Tell About
uis Personal Experiences
in That Conflict
NOTED LECTURER TO TALK ON
"THE MEN BEHIND THE GOUNS"
WILL ALSO GIVE OBSRVATIONS
MADE IN EUROPEAN
TRAVELS
George Haven Putnam, publisher
and writer, will make his debut as a
speaker in Ann Arbor when he speaks
on the subject, "The Men Behind the
Guns," at 7:45 o'clock tonight in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. The lec-
ture will be given under the auspices
of the historical association and is
open to the students and public in
general.
In recent years Mr. Putnam has
gained a reputation as a writer, and
is perhaps better known than any
other American publisher. His latest
book, entitled, "Memories of a Pub-
lisher," gives one a glimpse of the
wide circle of friends that he possesses
both here and in other countries.
His friendliness and appreciation
for the works of others are manifest-
ed in all his works, and his peaceful
terms with England have often
brought him the name, "Ambassador
of the American Public to England."
His close observations abroad should
furnish him material for the subject
he has chosen.
Mr. Putnam is a veteran of the Civil
war, and spent part of his career as a
soldier, in Libby and Danville prisons.
His lecture tonight will undoubtedly
include a recital of his experiences
there. Inasmuch as the lecturer proved
quite popular in his recent addresses
at Harvard, Princeton and Yale uni-
versities, it is expected that a large
delegation of students will turn out.
The speaker will be introduced by
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the history
department.
36i,00 VOTES CAST ON NEW
JERSEY SUFFRAGE AMENDMENT
New York, Oct. 20.-Returns from
New Jersey show that the total vote
cast on the suffrage amendment was
about 365,000. This is 84 per cent of
the total registration in the last pres-
idential election.
Undaunted by the results, the wom-
en of New Jersey have already started
a fresh campaign for suffrage.
Forestry Lab, Receives Spruce Trees
Several special spruce trees have
been received by the forestry depart-

ment from the Adirondack mountains..
These trees, which are an important
species of the spruce family, will be
added to the nearly complete ap-
paratus of the forestry labratory.
Graduate of Medical School :Dies
Dr. Leon Parker, of Carson City,
Iowa, a graduate of the medical
school, died suddenly at his home yes-
terday. The end was entirely unex-
pected, the doctor being stricken while
examining patients in his office.

ENGLAND OR FRANCE TO BEAR
BRUNT OF NEXT BLOW
AT ALLIES
FRENCH ASK JAPS TO ASSIST
Claini is Now Made TIrat Entente
Trouble Has Long Ex-
isted
London, Oct. 20.-Signs of rupture
now apparent between France and
England are hailed in Germany as the
forerunners of the downfall of ,the al-
lied forces, and victory for the Ger-
mans seems in sight. Germany ex-
pects to deal a' death blow to France
and England while they fight among
themselves.
The Teutons are still undecided
which of these two allies will be the
first to stand the brunt of the new
attack. The Germans are bending
every effort to make the new cam-
paign a success, and nothing in the
way of preparation has been omitted
by them. The soldiers necessary for
the new attack have been mustered,
and enthusiasm runs high. Germany
now practically holds the fate of Ser-
via in her hands. The feeling of dis-
content between the English and
French allies is one of long standing,
and dates back almost to the opening
of hostilities against the Teutons last
year.
The French state that the sentiment
between the membersho the quad-
ruple allies is so bad. that they 40o not
hesitate to call for help. Japan has
been asked for aid, but she is not in
a position to involve herself any more
than necessary at the present time.
German Attack Repulsed
London, Oct. 20.-The German at-
tack upon the British front has been
repulsed with heavy losses.
An official bulletin today stated that
an attempt by the Turks to explode
a mine under hill No. 60 at Gallipoli
was ill-timed, and the mine exploded
under their own lines, causing exten-
sive damages to their own positions
but no damage to the allies.
Italians in Retreat
Berlin, Oct. 21, 12:30 a. m.-The
Taggesblatt correpondent has wired
that a third battle at Iwanga has been
started and that the Italians are
forcedto flee.
Austrians Evacuate Czernovitz
London, Oct. 20.-A report from
Bucharest states that the Austrians
have been forced to evauate Czerno-
vitz, the capital of Buckowina.
Road from Lille Bombarded
Paris, Oct. 20.-The artillery duel is
very violent north of Arras. The
road from Lille has been heavily bom-
barded and several munition trains
were exploded.
TORPEDO DESTROYERS PROVED
USELESS AS SCOUT CRUISERS
Washington, Oct. 20.--One lesson
learned from the recent maneuvers of
the navy is that torpedo destroyers
are of no use as substitutes for scout
cruisers. Admiral Fletcher had no
scout cruisers in his defending fleet,
and so used torpedo destroyers in
their. place. The conclusion was
reached that such a move was Imprac-
tical and futile.
WOMEN TO BE EMPLOYED 4
LONI)ON TRAMWAY CONDUCTORS
London, Oct. 20.-Women will soon
be employed as tramway conductors,
according to a statement given out by

the authorities here today. The abil-
ity of the women to take care of this
position has been thoroughly proven.
The strong unions are decidedly in
favor of the movement.
Woolsack Selects New Members Today
Woolsack, junior law honorary so-
ciety, will meet at 2 o'clock this aft-
ernoon for its fall election of new
members. Eleven men will. be chosen,
selections to be made on a basis of
scholarship.

OTHER CLASSES ALSO SELECT

WHAT'S GOIN
TODAY
Senior engineer assembly
engineering building, 10:

Junior
348,

engineering asse
engineering bui

o'clock.
Sophomore engineer ass
348, engineering bui
o'clock.
Colorado club smoker,1
o'clock.
Glee club rehearsal, Ade
U hall, 7:10 o'clock.
Hon. G. H. Putnam spea
Caswell Angell hall, 7:
Warthin Sex lecture, W
amphitheater, 7:30 o'clo
Catholic Students' club,
hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Senior laws election, r
building, 4:00 to 5:00C
Forestry club trip to Ca
new science building, 6
Senior architects electi
draughting room, 12:00
Commerce club meets, 10
building, 7:15 o'clock.
Student council meeting,
U hall, 7:15 o'clock.
Mandolin club tryouts,z
room 205, 7:00 o'clock.
Senior engineering asse
348, engineering building
ThMORROW
Senior pharmic elections
chemical building, 1:00
Junior law elections, ro
building, 4:00 to 6:000
Webster - society meets
rooms, 7:00 o'clock.
Homeopathic banquet,
Union, 7:00 o'clock.
Alpha Nu meets, Alpha N
hall, 7:30 o'clock.

Close majorities marked the results
G N of the junior engineer class election
yesterday afternoon. M. W. Patterson
won the presidency over H. L. Car-
roll by a majority of nine; K. F. Wal-
y, room 348, ker defeated A. E. Hecker for vice-
:00 o'clock. president by two votes; N. G. Robert-
mbly, room son had a majority of one vote over.
lding, 9:00 Willis Broadhead for the office of
treasurer, and W. B. Gernt won the
embly, room basketball managership over R. Bird-
ilding, 8:00 sell by two votes. The complete list
of officers is as follows: President,
Union, 7:45 M. W. Patterson; vice-president, K. F.
Walker; secretary, Warner Seabury;
elphi rooms, treasurer, N. G. Robertson; basket-
ball manager, W. B. Gernt; track
ks in Sarah manager, J. V. Kuivenen; baseball
45 o'clock. manager, E. A. Thomas.
est medical Although the balloting had been
ck. postponed a number of times, due to
St. Thomas the withdrawal of several candidates,
the fresh law class yesterday elected
oom C, law all of its class officers from the ballot
o'clock. which was completed Tuesday and
scade Glen, announced yesterday morning. Wil-
6:00 o'clock. liam E. Mathews was chosen presi-
ion, senior dent, and the remainder of the list
D o'clock. was as follows: Vice-president, L. H.
4 economics Smith; secretary, David Hubar; treas-
urer, R. A. Hall; football manager,
north wing, Gerald Hagar; basketball manager, A.
F. Paley; track manager, George Hur-
north wing, ley; baseball manager, Felix Baer;
oratorical delegate, J. E. Ryan.
nmbly, room Soph medics will hold their elec-
g, 10 o'clock. tion from 8:45 to 10:15 o'clock in the
east physiology lecture room, medical
room 303, building. The list of nominees is as
o'clock. follows: President, H. G. Lundgren
aom C, law and T. L. Tolan; vice-president, AmQ-
o'clock. lia T. Wood; secretary, D. K. Bacon
s, Webster and A. H. Watt; treasurer, J. R. Dar-
nall and C. H. Marshall; football man-
Michigan ager, C. H. Marshall and J. H. Smith;
baseball manager, B. Fellows and A.
u rooms, U H. Watt; track manager, E. C. Baum-
(Continued on Page Six)

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