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May 06, 1916 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-06

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THE DAILY
NEWS OF THE WORLD AN 1)
THE CAMPUS

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ITLEGRAPI SERVICE I THE
NEW YORK SUN

VOL. XXVI. No. 150.

.s. .,

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 6, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

WOMEN'S LEAGUE
PAGEANT ENJOYED
BY LARGE CROW

QUAINT WITCHERY OF
TION PROVES TO
EFFECTIVE

PROAI)uc.
BE

COSTUMES TYPIFY CENTURY
Prof. Kenyon Expresses Possibility of
Second Performance, Fol-
lowing Request
Before a large and appreciative au-
dience, the Shakespearean pageant,
"The Queen's Progress," given under
the auspices of the Women's league,
was performed in Hill auditorium last
night. q
Almost from the entrance upon the
scene of the two scarlet-clad men-at-
arms to the last word of the epilogue,
the quaint old witchery of the ays of
"Merrie England" was enjoyed by the
audience. The book was written by
Professors Herbert Alden Kenyon and
Morris Palmer Tilley, the former also
acting in the capacity of director of
the pageant. The story, though sim-
pie in itself, possessed a subtle charm
that was sustained throughout, while
to the deft joining and piccing togeth-
er of the "full sum. of gentle Shake-
speare's power" was due the hearty
applause that was accorded.
Following the entrance of C. P. An-
derson as Master of the Revels, the
(Continued on Page Six)
}.TO RAISE S7;0O FOR
PROHIBITION CM IGN
Work to Be Done by Pole Book Meth-
od, Similar to One Used by
National Parties-
Plans to raise $7,000 in the county
for the support of the movement to-
ward prohibition are now under way.
Of this amount, $5,000 will be used in
Washtenaw 'county itself; the rest
will go to aid the work in other parts
of the state.
Committee work for the Washtenaw
county state-wide prohibition cam-
paign, which received an initial im-
pulse in Ann Arbor Thursday at a
meeting and banquet, when $1,000 was
raised to the support of the drys in
15 minutes, will be under way in
the near future.,
Several members of the university
faculty will have places on this com-
mittee. The work is to be done by
the pole book method, comparable to
the one already in vogue by the Re-
publican and Democratic parties.
A contribution of $100 was made
to the movement by S. S. Kresge, own-
er of a chain of five and ten cent
stores. He is giving $100 for each
store he owns.
Dean W. B. Hinsdale, of the homeo-
pathic school, was one of the speakers
at the banquet which followed the re-
cent meeting. Registrar A. G. Hall
acted as toastmaster. The chief speech
was made by the Hon. J. T. Botkin,
ex-congressman from Kansas, and ex-
warden of the Kansas state peniten-
tiary. He gave an account of the con-
ditions existing in Kansas under pro-
hibition.
LLOYD-GEORIE BACKS UP
ARMY'S DEMAND FOR MEN
London, May 5.-Speaking on a mo-
tion to reject the military service bill,
David Lloyd-George, minister of mu-
nitions, said in the house of commons
today that he would rather be driven
out of the Liberal party-even out of
political life altogether-than have
upon his conscience the responsibil-
Ity of refusing the demands of the
military authorities for men which
might make all the difference between
defeat and victory.

Those who asserted that if the war
lasted until 1917 the nation could not
"stay the course" were both inaccur-
ate and injudicious, he said.
Mr. Lloyd-George argued that until
Russia had completed her equipment,
so as to employ her immense reserves
of men, it was essential that France
and Great Britain put every available

Alchemists Take
In Eight New lien
Initiation Followed by Banquet at Ca-
talpa Inn; R. M. McCormick
Alchemists, honorary chemical so-
ciety, held its semi-annual initiation
yesterday afternoon on the campus in
front of the chemistry building. The
men who were taken in are: T. F.
Paisley, '17E, W. C. Hansen, '17E, C.
W. Reade, '17E, C. E. Hart, '17E, F.
J. Thieme, '18E, C H.Stump, '18E,
and G. J. Fischer, '18P. Prof. E. E.
Ware of the chemical engineering de-
partment was also initiated at this
time
After the initiation a banquet was
held at the Catalpa Inn in honor of
the new men. R. M. McCormick acted
as toastmaster and short talks were
given by A. J. Gans, '16, W. C. Hansen.
'17E, Prof. E. E. Ware and Prof. A.
H. White of the chemical engineering
department.
Germans Jielieve
War Impossible
Publication of German Reply Is Fa-
vorably Received by
People
Berlin, via Amsterdam, May 5.-The
publication of the Germa reply to
President Wilson's demands with ref-
erence to submarine warfare was re-
ceived with general satisfaction.
Consensus of opinion in Germany
today was that the German note, un-
ualifiedly yielding as it does to the
American demands to conform its U-
boat campaign to the interests of neu-
trals, makes it impossible for the
United States to realize its threat to
ever diplomatic relations.
It is'believed here that the note re-'
moved all doubt that a diplomatic
break would make, as far as Germany
is concerned, a war between the two
nations and that Germany can, by
making its concessions as desired, pre-
veit such a satastrophe, even at the
cost of submarine warfare.
Error Made, Rectified by The Daily
The Daily wishes to rectify an error
made in Wednesday morning's paper.
Under the caption of coming events,
Commencement Day was given as on
June 24 instead of June 29. The Bac-
calaureate services will be held on
June 25.
RUSSIANS IN MOSCOW REVOLT
Explode More Than 5,000) Tons of
Oils; City Afire
Berlin, May 5, by Wireless to Say-
ville.-Revolutionary workmen in Mos-
cow have exploded kerosene and ben-
zine tanks belonging to the Russian
government, according to reports from
Stockholm received by the Overseas
News agency.
The reports say that more than
5,000 tons of the oils were destroyed
in a few seconds, the noise of the ex-
plosion being heard at a great dis-
tance from Moscow.
Fire which started after the explo-
sion has spread to the administrative
and other buildings in the neighbor-
hood of the tanks and is still burning.
"Y" MEETINGS DISCONTINUED
Sunday Night Talks Will Be Given1
in New Auditorium Next Year

No more "Y" Sunday meetings will
be held at the Arcade theater this
year. This announcement was made
yesterday as a result of a decision
of the Y. M. C. A. cabinet. The cause
of the discontinuance of the meetings
has not been given out.
Meetings similar to this year's "Y"
Arcade gatherings will probably be
held next year but they will take place
in the auditorium of the new Y. M. C.
A. building instead of the Arcade
theater.
Add F. It. Fitch, '17L, to Union Ballot
A fourth name was yesterday ad-
ded to the list of candidates announc-
ed for the presidency of the Michigan
Union for next year. Ferris H. Fitch,
'17L, is the owner of the new hat in
the ring. The election, which will be
held at the time of the general elec-
tion, about June 1, promises a closer
race with the addition of the new can-

MICHIGAN OUT FR0
I REENGE OVER"BIG
ORANGEMEN TODAY
VETERAN LINEUP AGAIN OPPOSES
MICHIGAN'S BEST .
TALENT
MILLER STARTS FOR MICHIGAN
Harrington, Although Bothered by Sore
Arm, Is Coach's Choice for
Second Base
Niemann, right field.
Harrington, second base.
Labadie, left field.
Brandell, center field.
Walterhouse, shortstop.1
Caswell, first base.
Thomas, third base.
Duune, catcher.
Miller, pitcher.
Captain George Labadie and the rest
of the Michigan baseball team are de-
termined to secure revenge on the
Syracuse baseball team in today's
game.
Syracuse has a veteran team, eight
of the men that lined up against the
Wolverines last Thursday having
played on last year's team. The
Orangemen are particularly well for-I
tified in the matter of pitchers, and
they claim a staff of twirlers which
they assert is second to none in col-
lege circles.t
Miller will probably oppose the visi-
tors. The big twirler is in good shape<
and if both men are accorded goodI
support, the game should resolve it-
self into a pitcher's battle.<
Harrington will probably appear att
second. Harrington has been troubled
with a bad arm but he has been hit-
ting the ball fight on the nose andl
is a valuable offensive asset.
REPORTS SAY ILLA
HAS BEEN LOCATED
Dispatch from Gen. Pershing Reaches
El Paso; Say Americans
Close in on Bandit
PLAN TO REDISTRIBUTE FORCES
El Paso, May 5.-Pancho Villa's hid-
ing place has been discovered byt
American scouts, and American sol-
diers now are closing in upon theI
bandit leader "somewhere in Mexico."r
This is the substance of a dispatchl
sent by General Pershing to Maj.-Gen.;
Funstaii at El Paso this afternoon.
General Pershing, it was said, nad tel-t
egraphed that he had located Villa
and that he expected to close in on the,
bandit immediately.
Tie message did not state wheret
Villa had been found but indicated
that Americans had found him and1
that Americans would capture him if
the 1,4ndit was caught.1
General Pershing has gone from
Namiqipa to inspect the troops, and
make a new distribution o' the forces.
Further conferences on th Mexican
.ii us. 'n between Genera Scott and
General Obregon are awaiting the1
p.leasure of General Obregon, wh> pre-1
unmably has not recv.1 hii oicial
nIru( ons from Mexic..

Tire Lelief is that the conference
rtay te held soon, as General Scott
stated that he had asked Ge-ieral Oh-
"gor to set a time for the next meet-
Issue Writ of Mandamus Against City
A writ of mandamus was issued
against the city council of Ann Arbor
yesterday afternoon on the instigation
of William Corson, of this city, to com-
pel the city fathers to show cause why,
they should not issue a saloon license
for Corson. Corson's petition for a.
license to operate was not passed by
the council at their meeting about
two weeks ago. Every other petition
pi esented was granted a license:
Craftsmen Hold Election Tonight
Craftsmen, the student Masonic so-
ciety, will meet in the Masonic hall
at 7:30 o'clock this evening to elect
officers for next year. Dean Wilbert
B. Hinsdale, of the Homeopathic med-

31 Taken Since War Began,
Germans Demolish 26
Aeroplanes

London, May 5.-Two Zeppelins
were brought down today, one by a
British warship near Salonica, while
the other was destroyed by one of
the French light cruisers on the
Schleswig coast. This makes 31
Zeppelins destroyed since the out-
break of the war.
London, May 5.-Arrival of the first
batch of the wounded British troops
from Kut-El-Amara, recently captur-
ed by the Turks, is reported by Lieut-
Sir Percy Lake, British commander in
Mesopotamia.
Berlin, May 5.-Twenty-six aero-
planes were shot down by German
aviators on the western front in
April, according to official figures
given out here today.
MIachine Crashes
Over Embankment
Report Automobile as Belonging to
Sam Heusel, Local
Baker
According to a report received from
police headquarters last night, a large
touring car, bearing a number regis-
tered under the name of Sam Heusel,
the baker, crashed over the embank-
ment of the Michigan Central bridge
and injured a woman occupant of the
car. The extent of her injury is not
known.
Nothing definite could be ascertained
as to the cause of the accident. The
car was reported as being damaged
considerably.
RELATIVES OF LUSITANIA
VICTIMS FILE TWO SUITS
'Xuui., y and Lund Families Ask for
,F.000 Each from Cunard Line
on Negligence C(',garc
Relatives of two Chicag, victims of
t fi L;'tania filed two suits for $50,-
000 each against the Chnard steam-
ship -ompany in the federal court
yeIstirls.v
One was brought by Mrs. Sarah
Lund, widow of Charles 1I. Lund, and
his fP her and mother, John and
Amanda Lund, and the otl er by George
.ounsey and the sons and daugh-
ters of William Mounsey,
The suits are based on the conten-
tion :il the Lusitania carried."sub-
marines, troops, and mulions and was
painted gray after the ma.mer of Brit-
,sh battleships."
The bills further state that the Lusi-
tania did not heed the warning issued
by the German governmi it and dad
at nu:esue a zigzag cosr:e, but pro-
c eded ,traight into the danger zone
at slow speed.
The bills also state that su~ficieit
lifeboat:- were not pr vided.
Faculty Reinstates Striking Students
University, Ala., May 5.-Seventy
seniors of the University of Alabama,
suspended because they disapproved
as a body the dismissal of Fred L.
Aquer and T. D. Johnson for alleged
hazing, were ordered reinstated today
by university authorities.
Aquer and Johnson, it was an-
nounced, will be given an opportun-
ity to stand the June examinations
for degrees.
GIVES INTERESTING LECTURE
Dr. Edward L. Stevenson Illustrates
Talk With Slides and Early Maps

With the aid of a number of early
maps, Dr. Edward L. Stevenson deliv-
ered an interesting lecture on "Early
Discovery and Exploration in the New
.World," yesterday afternoon in the
auditorium of the New Science build-
ing.
Dr. Stevenson showed slides of rare
examples of the cosmographer's art,
some dating as 'far back at 1432. The
maps traced the geographical knowl-
edge of the universe from the 15th
century .until modern times. . Among
the most interesting exhibits were
the artistically colored maps and those
bearing sketches of the life in the

I *

4' .,. 4. *
* * 4, * *

**
* Hold Straw Hat Day Next Saturday
* *.
* Now that last winter's over- *
* coat has disappeared to the bot-
tomn of the trunk awaiting fu-
* ture reference, and that toque *
* has become a memory, "the *
* young man's fancy lightly turns *
* to the thoughts" of a new straw *
* hat. *
* The question of when Straw *
* Hat Day is to be held has arisen. *z
* The fatal day for the hat of *
cloth will probably be next Sat- *
urday, when all but straw hats *
are to be discarded to make *
* room for the summer headgear. *
*
*** * * *, * * * * * * *
No Report From N. 0. L. Contest
No report from the Northern Ora-
torical League contest at Urbana, Il-
linois, in which N. E. Pinney, '16, is
representing the University, was re-
ceived up to a late hour last night.
The universities competing are:
Michigan, Illinois, Northwestern, Wis-
consin, Oberlin, Minnesota and Iowa.
The subject of Pinney's oration is
"The Supernational Mind."
ASQUITH LAUDS U.S.
FOR IO TO BELGIUM
British Premier Says Without Re-
lief Nation Would Have
Starved
London, May 5.-Premier Asquith
gave praise to the generosity and
quick action of the American people
in extending assistance to the Bel-
gians, in an address today at the first
annual meeting of the national com-
mittee for the relief of Belgium, held
in the mansion house.
The lord mayor presided, and the
speakers included the Belgian min-
ister, Cardinal Bourne, the Duke of
Norfolk and Herbert C. Hoover, chair-
man of the American commission for
relief in Belgium.
Pays Page Compliment
After moving the adoption of the
report to the committee and thanking
it for its efforts, the premier compli-
mented Ambassador Page. He con-
tinued:
"In this splendid work we all have
indelibly impressed on our minds the
splendid humanity, generosity and
quick action of the great American
people, who rose to the occasion so
characteristically, and without whom
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity-Fair today.
TODAY
10:00 o'clock-All-Fresh vs. Univer-
sity of Detroit, S. Ferry Field.
2:00 o'clock-Notre Dame vs. Michi-
gan, track meet, Ferry Field.
3:00 o'clock--Syracuse vs. Michigan.
baseball game, Ferry Field.
7:00 o'clock-Upper Room Bible
class meets, 444 S. State street.
7:30 o'clock -.-Craftsmen Society
meets, Masonic hall.
9:00 o'clock-Michigan Union dance,
Barbour gym.
9:00 o'clock-University dance, Pack-
ard academy.
TOMORROW
8:00 o'clock-Dr. Max Margolis
speaks, "Translating the Scriptures,"
before the Menorah Society, Newberry

hall.
I -NOTICE S
All band men appear in khaki ni-
form in front of University hall at
1:30 o'clock for the Notre Dame track
meet and the Syracuse vs. Michigan
ball game.
Final round of the championship
golf tourney will be played today -
Tickets for the University dance
will be on sale in University hall from
11:00 o'clock to 12:00 o'clock, and also

B3ritish destroy
Two Zeppelins

While

PRESIDENT RESERVES DECI
UNTIL OFFICIAL TEXT
IS IN HAND

GERMAN REPLY TO WILSON'S NOTE
ALITHOUGH DIPLOMATICALLY EVASIVE
WILL STOP BREAK IN NEGOTIATION'

WORDING LEAVES LOOPHOLES
Note Has Served Its Purpose in That
Diplomatic Affairs Have Been
Reopened
Washington, May 5.-President Wil-
son has reserved decision on the sub-
marine issue until. he receives the offi-
cial text, but there are many indica-
tions that the German reply to the
American note will avert a diplomatic
break.
The German note was satisfactory
in more ways than one, which appa-
rently means the President's demand
that Germany "imniediately declare
and effect an abandonment of the
present methods of submarine war-
fare" has been granted. German sub-
marine commanders have been or-
dered to conduct their warfare against
merchantmen "in accordance with the
general principles of visit and search
recognized by international law," and
these orders, according to the note,
are in effect now.
The fact that Germany threatens to
withdraw this, unless the United States
demands concessions from Great Brit-
ain relative to the blockade, is not
regarded as necessarily the first Ger-
man concession to the American de-
mands. The United States, it is ex-
plained, will know how to deal with
this threat should it be put into execu-
tion. In the meantime, the submarine
menace to non-combatants is at least
temporarily eliminated and this is a
change for which the President has
been striving.
It is too early to predict with cer-
tainty that the President will accept
this concession, but indications strong-
ly point that way. The President re-
ceived the German reply as cabled to
Sayville and presented the negotia-
tions promptly before a cabinet meet-
ing.
The unfavorable impression made
by the sharp wording in the prelimin-
ary portions of the note was offset by
the outline of the orders to submarine.
commanders, which indicates the spe-
cific concession which the imperial
government has made. It is under-
stood that the President dismissed
nmuch of the severe verbiage of the
note on the ground that it was in-
tended for home consumption in
Berlin.
Following the cabinet meeting, Sec-
retary Lansing said "the question
could not be discussed at 'this time."
He then added that "certain inquiries
concerning the note probably would
be sent to the German government."
Thus it was regarded as significant
that the note had served its purpose
and reopened diplomatic negotiations
between the two countries. President
Wilson had made it clear that in case
the German reply did not meet his
demands he would not enter into any
further discussion.
Other cabinet officers reflected that
the tension had relaxed. Postmaster
General Burleson *,*ould not discuss
(Continued on Page Six)
MENORAH HEARS OR, MARGOLIS
Prominent Jewish Scholar to Talk on
"Translating the Scriptures"
Members of the Menorah society-
will have an unusual treat in the form
of an address to be delivered by Dr.
Max L. Margolis of the Dropsie Col-
lege, tomorrow evening at 8:00 o'clock
in Newberry hall.
Dr. Margolis is one of the leading
Jewish Biblical scholars and Semitic
philologists in the country. He was

formerly one of the faculty of the He-
brew Union College of Cincinnati as
well as a member' of the faculty of
the University of California. He now
occupies the chair of Biblical Philology
at the Dropsie College and most re-
cently his labors have been directed,
as editor-in-chief, to the new transla-
tion of the Bible to be published
shortly by the Jewish Publication so-

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