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May 05, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-05

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TFE DAILY
50c
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

GANnl

Phones:--Edi

TELEGRAPH SERVICE I
NEW YORK SUN

_ 4

VOL. XXVI. No. 149.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 5, 1916.

PRICE FIV

_ .;ti-- -

DRESS REHARSAL
ASSURES SUCCESS
OF PAGEANT SCENES
OBSERVERS NOTE ELIZABETHAN
ATMOSPHERE IN TONIGHT'S
EVENT
STAGE IS WOODLAND GLADE
Dancers Move Smoothly Through In-
tricate Figures; Seat Sale Points
to Large Audience
"I have produced more than 75 plays
and pageants," said Prof. Herbert Al-
den Kenyon, director of the Shake-
spearean pageant, to be given in Hill
auditorium at 8:00 o'clock this even-
ing, "but I believe that "The Queen's
Progress" surpasses them all. It is
certainly one of the largest pageants
to be staged in this part of the coun
try in connection with the Shakes.
peare Tercentenary, and as far as I am
aware, nothing like it will be produced
by any other college or university."
From the moment that the two tall
men-at-arms entered upon the stage
to the last mystic whirl of the Goddess
of Night, the few observers present at
the first dress rehearsal held last night
were aware of the quaint glamour and
charm of the Elizaethan age.
The stage of Hill auditorium is set
for a woodland glade, one of the most
mammoth scenes ever produced, re-
quiring the use of 2500 yards of can-
vas. To the right of the stage is
the throne of the queen, garlanded in
flowers.
The intricate figures of the peas-
ant, court, and fairy dances were well
worked out, the dancers exhibiting a
grace and ease of movement which
promes well for tonight's perform-
ance. Not a little of the pleasing ef-
fect is due.to the elaborate costumes
employed. The pageant will not be
of longer duration than an hour and
a half, but all the best loved and most
familiar scenes in Shakespeare's plays
will be portrayed.
The records of the seat sale for the
past few days give every promise of a
capacity audience. The box office in
Hill auditorium will continue to dis-
pose of the remaining tickets, begin-
ning at 9:00 o'clock this morning.
Prices range from 50 cents to one
dollar.
JUDGE LINDSEY SERIOUSLY ILL
Noted Denver Jurist Operated on for
Tumor Last Week
Denver, Col., May 4.-Judge Ben-
jamin Barr Lindsey, of the Denver Ju-
venile court, who has made a national
reputation through his adjudication of
juvenile crime, lies critically ill at
his residence here. 'About a week ago
Judge Lindsey wasoperated on for
the removal of a tumor from his chest.
Since then his condition has gradually
grown weaker.
Judge Lindsey was born November
25, 1869, in Jackson, Tenn., and was
admitted to the bar in 1894. He has
served as judge of the juvenile court
of Denver since 1901. He has been
noted for his sytem of putting boys
convicted of crime on their honor, and
only five out of several hundred have
betrayed their trust. He has written
numerous articles for magazine pub-
lication. .

SENATE PASSES RURAL CREDITS
BILL; HOUSE TO AMEND ITT
Washington, May 4.-The Senate
passed the rural credits bill this af-
ternoon by a vote of 68 to 5. The
measure now goes to the house. It
is believed certain that it will be
amended there and will have to be
dealt with by a conference committee
of the two houses.

George Sisler to
Get Big Ovation
More Than 300 Students Expected to
Witness Detroit-St. Louis
Game Today
With over 250 tickets already sold
for the George Sisler Day baseball
game in Detroit this arternoon, Michi-
gan is sure of a big delegation at to-
day's contest.
The committee on arrangements an-
nounced last night that they expected
more than 300 students on the special
Michigan Central train which leaves
Ann Arbor at 12:30 o'clock this noon,
since there are always a large num-
ber who decided to go at the last
minute on a proposition of this nature.
The committee purchased a gold
watch for George yesterday afternoon
and the presentation will probably take
place when Sisler comes to bat in the
first inning. Ball players ordinarily
strike out under these trying circum-
stances, but George is so far from an
ordinary ball player that everyone
will be looking for something of a
different nature.
Just' who will present Sisler with
the timepiece had not been definitely
decided last night but it is probable
that one of his former professor's
in the engineering department will be
(Continued on Page Six)
IMMENSE SUM NEEDED TO
MAKE U, S. NAVY SECOND

SYRACUSE HANDS
MICHIGAN FIRST
DEFATAT HOME
ORANGEMEN TRIM VARSITY BY
COUNT OF THREE TO
NOTHING
EACH TEAM GETS FIVE HITS
Visitors Go to Lansing to Meet . A. C.-
Today; Return for Game
Tomorrow
Michigan sustained her first defeat
of the season on the home lot when
Syracuse conquered the Wolverines by
a score of 3 to 0 in a pitchers' battle
yesterday afternoon.-
Both teams secured five hits, but
the Syracuse apportionment came at
more opportune momens and therein
lies the tale of Michigan's defeat.
Both twirlers distributed the hits even-
ly, neither team managing to get more
than one in any single frame, but the
Syracuse allotment came at the psy-
chological moments and three of the
visitors crossed the plate. Two other
aspiring Orangemen were checked at
the platter, "Billy" Niemann's -splen-
did throw from right field nipping one
of them, while "Tommy" Thomas
threw out the other. Caswell's hur-
ried throw to "Tommy's" corner was
low and it eluded the third baseman,
but he recovered and chucked out the
runner at the plate when he became
overly ambitious and tried to score.
Michigan's best chance came in the
sixth inning. Niemann opened th'
frame with a single to right. Harring-
(Continued on age Six)
French Continue
Verdun Off ensive1
Further Gains Made, Paris Claims;
German Counter Attacks
Repulsed
Paris, May 4.--The new French po-
sition at Le Mort Homme, which re-
sulted from the gain made in yester-
day's attack, was enlarged and con-
solidated last night. Today the Ger-
mans bombarded violently both Le
Mort Homme and Hill 304, and also
sent out a small infantry attack
against certain of the trenches taken
by the French in the counter offensive.
This attack broke down under the
French barrier fire.
The French took the offensive today
in the Argonne region with activity in
the Bois de Chetty, and gaind the ad-
vantage in mine fighting at La Fille
Morte. A strong German reconnais-
ance was repulsed near Apremont,
east of St. Mihiel yesterday. In the
vicinity of Les Parges on thheights
of the Meuse, the French exploded a
mine effectively.
IS NOT A "JUSTICE HYPOCRITE"

GERARD SENDS FORECAST OF REF
BTO NOTE; GERMANY NOT TO YIELD
WILSON'S DEMANDS UNCONDITIOf

ROLLIN C. HUNTER, '17,
Who takes the part of Mark An-
tony in the mob scene from "Ju-
lius Caeser" in tonight's pageant.
TIREE AMERICANS
()A SLIN IN MEXICO
One Spaniard Also Meets Death in Re-
cent Anti-A merican Outbreak,

PARTY

Advices Say
('AUGHT IN

AiBFSiI

Will Require $791,000,000,
Board Says in Estimate
Given Out

General
Just

Washington, May 4.-It will cost
the United States $791,441,207 to
climb back into second place among
the naval powers of the world. This
is the estimate of the general board
of the navy transmitted to the Re-
publican members of the house naval
affairs committee and considered by
them tdday as a basis. for a proposal
to enlarge the building program sug-
gested by the administration.
* This total includes the cost of build-
ing ships, the cost of the additional
personnel required for one year, and
the cost of general stores and ammu-
nition for one year. In it is also in-
cluded the cost of expense items on
the ships noy in commission and
outlay to equip the ships now build-
ing and authorized. The general
board estimates, according to figures
submitted to the naval affairs coi-
mittee, that the United States must
have six dreadnoughts and 10 battle
cruisers to exceed Germany's navy.
In addition it must build 78 coast
submarines, 30 destroyers and 21
scout cruisers. For aeronautics, a
lump sum of $7,000,000 is proposed.
Senior Swing-Out
toV e Held May i6
Will Assemble in Auditorium of Uni-
versity Hall for Address
by Pres. Hutchins
Swing-out has been set for Tues-
day, May 16. This announcement was
made last night following action tak-
en by a committee composed of the
presidents of the various senior class-
es. According to custom, all seniors
will assemble in the auditorium of
University hall, where a short address
will be delivered by Pres. Harry B.
Hutchins. After the assembly, the
classes will form in line and commence
their march about the campus. Full
details concerning the order of march
and the route to be taken will be
made public within a few days.
Merchants report that a large num-
her of seniors have not yet ordered
their caps and gowns. Since less than
two weeks remain before swing-out,
it is urged that all who have not donej
so make their arrangements at once.j

Washington, May 4.-Three Ameri-
cans and one Spaniard were killed
near Rosario in the state of Sinaloa in
a recent anti-American outbreak in
Mexico, according to advices filed with
the State department through Sena-
tor Fall, of New Mexico. This inci-
dent is one of scores that have just
begun to come to the notice of the
State department as the first fruits of
Mexican resentment against the puni-
tive expedition.
Advices today from El Paso gave
details of the murder of P. H. Holly,
an American rancher, 15 miles north-
east of El Rucio, near San Antonio,
Mexico. Holly and his ranch foreman,
a Mexican, were slain the night of
April 29 by Villistas, because he acted
as scout for American troops who went
to Holly's ranch to rid it of bandits.
Atrocity Occurred April 3
The atrocity in which three Ameri-
cans were killed occurred April 3. It
is related in a letter from V. H. York,
a mine operator in the territory of Te-
pic. The letter is dated Mazatlan,
state of Sinaloa,rApril 12, and has just
arrived in Washington.
York and three men companions
were convoying a party of women and
children to Mazatlan from the interior,
in obedience to warnings from the In-
dians that the countryside was in-
flamed over the invasion of Mexican
soil by American troops, and the party
was ambushed. York himself would.
have been killed but forathe pleading
of the Mexican women and the chil-
dren. The Americans slain were S.
C. Burke, Walter Wallace, and Roger
Davidson; the Spaniard was Carolina
Rodringo. Their bodies were taken in-
to Rosario on a handcar and delivered
to President Wilson's special agent at
Mazatlan and buried by the American
colony there under the supervision of
the American consul.
Wilson Approves Tentative Agreement
Major-General Hugh L. Sctt, chief
of staff of the American army, was
tonight instructed by Secretary of War
Baker to notify General Obregon, Car-
ranza minister of war, that President
Wilson entirely approves of the ten-
tative agreement drawn up at the bor-
der between the officers.
The President tonight issued a state-
ment saying that he had examined
with the secretary of war the reports
made by General Scott of the confer-
ences. The report includes a tentative
agreement covering the futilre opera-
tions of both the American and Mexi-
(Continued on Page Six)

SECR OR PATTON FOR
BACCALUREATE SERMON
President Hutchins to Deliver Ad-
dress at Angehl Memorial
Services
Dr. Carl Patton, of Columbus, Ohio.
has consented to deliver the baccalaur-
eate sermon to seniors in Hill auditor-
ium on Sunday, June 25, according to
an announcement made yesterday by
Pres. Harry B. Hutchins.
Although it is the custom fo the
president of the university to give this
sermon, it has been necessary for
President Hutchins to obtain an out-
side speaker for the occasion. In
place of the baccalaureate sermon,
President #Hutchins will deliver the
main address at the memorial serv-
ices for the late President-Emeritus
James B. Angell on the following
Wednesday, June 28.
Dr. Patton was formerly pastor of
the First Congregational church in this
city and he now occupies the pulpit of
one of the largest Congregational
churches in the country at Columbus.
He was pastor here when Dr. Angell
attended the Congregational church.
In addition to speaking before the
graduates, Dr. Patton will have charge
of the devotional part of the memorial
services on June 2-8. These exercises
will also be held in Hill auditorium.
INDIANA UNIVERSITY HEAD
TO ENTER MILITARY CAMP
Indianapolis, Ind., May 4.-Presi-
dent William Lowe Bryan, of Indiana
University, has announced that he
will become a recruit and enter one
of the three military training camps to
be held at Fort Benjamin Harrison,
near here, this summer. He said he
had decided to do this as an example
to university students or the state.
WHAT'S GOINGONi
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Warmer, with variable winds.
TODAY
12:00 o'clock-Stylus meets for lun-
cheon, Newberry hall.
4:00 o'clock-G. C. Cummins speaks
on "The Relation of Engineering to
City Administration" in room 348, New
Engineering building.
4:1 1io'lock-Dr. Edward L. Ste-
venson speaks on "Warly Discoveryof
Exploration in the New World," Nat-
ural Science building auditorium.
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu discussion of
National Prohibitin,. Alpha Nu rooms,
401 U-hall.
8:00 o'clock-"The Queen's Prog-
ress," Hill auditorium. +

AMBASSADOR'S REPORT UJNCEE
TAIN BECAUSE OF POOR
CABLING
TEUTON ATTITUDE FAVORABLE
Restriction of Submarine Warfare De
pendent Upon American
Concessions
Bulletin
Berlin, May 4.-by wireless.--At $:3
o'clock this afternoon, James W. Ge
rard, the American ambassador to Ge
many, called on Herr von Jagow, th
German foreign minister, to recelv
fromĀ° him Germany's reply to thk
American note concerning submar
warfare,
Washington, May 4.-Germany wil
not yield unconditionally to Presiden
Wilson's demand that she "declar
and effect an immediate abandonmep
of her present methods of submarin
warfare." The situation wasauo
itatively described tonight as cri
Ambassador Gerard has sent tore
cast of the demanded Jply, an
though he regards it as favorable, I
is so involved and indefinite that el
ther President Wilton nor Secretar
of State Lansing was able to form
clear conception of what Germany'
position really is.
This in itself has made somewhat 0
an unfavorable impression on th
President, who insists on definite an
unequivocal assurances that the sr
marine menace to non-combatnts is
mediately cease. According to t
forecasts, however, that have reache
Washington, the imperial governmeu
apparently stands firm in its deterrn
ation to treat armed liners as wa
ships.
Germany also makes its restrictio
on submarine operations dependent o
concessions by the United States, b
what these concessions are is not clea
Above all it is not yet clear whethe
Germany will hold its submarine ope
ations in abeyance pending discusslo
of conditions to which it desires tli
United States to assent.
Secretary Lansing said this afte
noon that Mr. Gerard's dispatch wa
so poorly cabled that it was impossib
for him to say what it meant. He di
not know whether to regard it as fn
vorable or otherwise. The same i
formation came from the White Hous
Officials explained tonight that muc
depends on whether German's illega
submarine attacks in the war zone a
suspended during the discussion whit'
the German government wishes to in
tiate. Mr. Gerard's cable makes i
general reference to suspension
submarine warfare elsewhere thani
the war zone. The German note co
fines itself to restrictions and modil
cations of proclamations of the Ge:
man admiralty of February 4, 1915.
DE LLOYD JHOMPSON IN FA
Spectacular Aviator and Companl
Drop 600 Feet; Both Injured

Roosevelt Denies That He Applied.
This Sobriquet to Hughes
New York, May 4.-Colonel Roose-
velt did not call Justice Hughes a
"justice hypocrite." It had been re-
ported that the Colonel had applied
this sobriquet to the associate jus-
tice of the supreme court, and today
the Colonel issued a denial of that
statement, which was published in a
morning paper. The exact phraseol-
ogy of the words the Colonel was al-
leged to have made use of was, "that
justice hypocrite."
"This," said the Colonel, "is just
as preposterous as if it had said that
Mr. Hughes called me a Dutch reform
dinosaur. One statement would be
just as true as the other and just as
ridiculous."

TOMORROW
2:00 o'clock-Notre Dame vs. Michi- New York, May 4. - DeLloy
gan, track meet, Ferry Field. Thompson, the . spectacular aviate
3:00 o'clock--Syracuse vs. Michigan, -and preparedness advocate, who re
baseball game, Ferry Field. cently "bombarded" New York an
9:00 o'clock-Michigan Union dance, Washington from the sky, and Harol
Barbour gym. W. Blakely, aviation instructor of th
Sloane Aeroplane company, fell 60
feet from the air near the aviatio
U-NOTICES field at Garden City this afternoon.
Qualifying round of the campus Both were so badly injured that the
golf tourney continues, nine holes. were taken to the Nassau County hoE
Fresh lit baseball practice, 3:00 pital and the machine in which the
o'clock, game 4:00 o'clock, South Fer- were riding, owned by the New Yor
ry Field. Aeroplane company, was badly smash
Sophomore and junior engineers ed. Thompson's left leg was frac
vote on honor system today, second tured above the ankle, and Blakel
floor, Engineering building. may have internal injuries.

A Shakespearean Pageant
TON The Queen's Progress
H.Auspices Women's League
BDm.LH uiI I A IIiT n mDi I i Prices: 50-75-S100

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