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May 03, 1916 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1916-05-03

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4

TFE DAILY
75
'YEWS OF THE WORLD ABU
THE CA31PUS

CGAN

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY
NEW YORK SUN

- w

VOLP XXVI. No. 147.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN

PUBLICTION MEN
CHOSENBYBOARD
'FOR COMING YEARt
PARlER, '17, AND FISHLEIGH, '17E,
TO MANAGE
DAILY
WALSH TO EDIT YEAR BOOK
.:Ian ager for Athletic Program to Be
Selected at Later
Meeting
The managing editor and the busi-
ness manager of The Daily and the
managing editor of the Michiganen-
sian for the year 1916-17 were chosen
by the Board in Controlpf Student
Publications at its May meeting yes-
terday.
The following men were elected by
the board:
John C. B. Parker, '17, managing
editor of The Daily.
Clarence T. Fishleigh, '17E, busi-
ness manager of The Daily. ,
Edward F. Walsh, '17, managing edi-
tor of the Michiganensian.
Parker has worked upon the staff
of The Daily for three years, during
the last of which he filled the position
of assignment editor on the publica-
tion.
Fishleigh has served for two years
in the capacity of assistant business
manager of the paper.
Walsh for the past year was one
of the three junior assistants to the
managing editor of the Michiganen-
(Continued on Page Six)
OBREGON AND SCOTT
COME TO AGREEMENT
United States Forces to Remain in
Certain Area of Mexico
for Present
El Paso, May 2.--United States forces
will remain for the time being in Mex-
ico hunting for bandits, but they will
confine their operations to a definite
area,
Casas Grandes will be the base of
operations and the activity of the army
will be confined to the western part
of the state of Chihuahua. Their work
will have to do strictly with hunting
down bandits, i which they are to
receive the co-operation of the Car-
ranza government.
This is said to be the tentative
agreement reached this afternoon and
evening by General Scott and General
Obregon, representing the two gov-
ernments, in their conference at Hotel
Casa del Norte. General Obregon is
said to have opposed strongly any t-
tem'pt to keep the American troops in
Mexico, but after an exchange of tele-
grams between himself and First Chief
(Continued on Page Six)
TWO DIE IN PITTSBURG STRIKE
Riot at Thompson Steel Works Also
Causes Five to Be Fatally Wounded
Pittsburg, May 2.-Two men were
killed, five probably fatally wounded
and a score or more of others more
or less seriously wounded in a riot at
the 13th Street entrance of the Edgar
Thompson Steel Works, Braddock, this
afternoon. Strikers from the Turtle

Creek and Monongehela Valleys, en-.
deavoring to enlist part of the Thomp-
son employees in the fight for an
eight-hour day, charged the plant and
fought a sharp battle with deputy
sheriffs and the company guards.
Anna Bell, the young woman leader
of the striking Westinghouse employ-
ees, was arrested tonight on a charge
urder in connection with the Brad-
dock fatalities.
Tickets
NoW on Sale
HILL 4001T001UM.
9 A. M.--6 P. M.
Prices: 50-75-$1.00

Asquith To Launch
Conscription Bill1
Totl ont ibutioni of Empime to W~.a
has Been 5,000,000 Men,
Says Premier
London, May 2.-Premier Asquith
made three important announcements
in the Ecuse of Commons today. They
were:
1. That a bi will be introduced
tomorrow for general and immediate
conscription.
2. That the total naval and military
efforts of the British empire since the
beginning of the war have exceeded
5,000,000 men.
3. That the surrender of the gar-
rison at Kut-el-Amara was not an act
of importance.
Premier Asquith also said he hoped
to give an early opportunity for the
discussion of the motion calling on the
resignation of Augustine Birrell, chief
secretary for Ireland.
After reviewing carefully the con-
ditions under which recruiting has
bee carried out, the premier said, it
had been decided that the men re-
quired could not and would not be1
(Continued on Page Six)
iMichigamua Holds
Initiation Todayj
Twehe Palefaces Will Be Subjected
to Tortures All Good Indians
Must Undergo
Today when the white man's bell on
the top of the high cabin shall ring
six times forth will come the braves
of the Michigamua famed for brave
and' valiant deeds.
Standing aroujid the great oak of
Tappan will be 12 palefaces who have
been deemed worthy to take the long
trail that leads to the happy hunting
ground. These young palefaces will
be lead away by the fighting braves
over the path of many trials, sub-
jected to the torturms which all good
Indians must undergo and then they,
will come to the lodge of those w'ho
welcome palefaces strong and brave
for deeds of valor.
RUSSIANS REGAIN TERRITORY
Austro- Hungarian Headquarters An-
nounces More Than 2,000 Prisoners
Berlin, via wireless, May 2.-The
Russians have regained by a counter-
attack, positions north of Mlynob, it
was announced in the Austro-Hunga-
rian headquarters statement of April
30 received here from Vienna. More
than 2,000 prisoners were taken by the
Austrian forces in the engagement
April 28, when the Russian lines were
penetrated.
It is reported from Saloniki that a
Germanrsubmarine has torpedoed a
large transport. It is said the trans-
port was torpedoed off Kara Barun, 10
miles east of Saloniki.
The number of casualties suffered by
the British forces in Mesopotamia dur-
ing March and April is given at 20,000
in a Constantinople dispatch.
Engagement of Eva Stro Announced
News has been received of the en-
gagement of Miss Eva R. Stroh, '15,
of Detroit, to Leo M, Bauer, Univer-
sity of Illinois, '14, of Horton, Kan-
sas. Miss Stroh is a member of Theta
Phi Alpha sorority.
Cos nopolitans to Nominate Officers

Nomination of officers for the year.
1916-1917 will be made at a general
meeting of the Cosmopolitan club to
be held at 7:30 o'clock Friday night
at the Unitarian church parlors.
Artist Nobleman Injured in Fall
New York, May 2,-Prince Paul
Troubetskoy, the sculptor, was thrown
from his horse and seriously hurt on
the bridle path in Central park yester-
day, while riding with the princess,

ERRORSIN FOR.
ARSITYVER YPSI
Walterhouase Hitting Star; Labade
Pilfers Four Sacks; Lundgreni
Uses Three Twirlers
STEAL 10 BASES DURING GAME
Michigan inflicted a 5 to 1 defeat
upon Ypsilanti yesterday afternoon,
errors of commission and omission
figuring largely in the visitor's down-
fall.
The Wolverines tallied three times
right in the initial stanza, although
they produced but one clean hit. Two
bases on balls and a fluke single, this
last coming as a contribution from
Caswell, proving sufficient. Michigan
literally ran wild on the bases, steal-
ing 10 sacks during the course of the
game, Captain George Labadie grab-
bing off four himself.
Walterhouse Bats 1.000
Walterhouse continued his sensa-
tional hitting, finishing the afternoon
with a perfect average, the second
time that he has accomplished this
achievement in the last two starts.
The first two hits of the shortstop's
were the cleanest sort of drives, and
his final safety was a line drive to
short which the gentleman essaying
to play that position for the Normal
lads was unable to check successful-
(Continued on Page Six)
Zeppelins Appear
On English Coast
Raiders Drop Bombs in Yorkshire and
in Scotland; Exact Damage.
Done Not Reported
London, May 2.-Five Zeppelins ap-
peared over the northwest coast of
England and the northeast coast of
Scotland early tonight.
It is known that the raiders dropped,
two bombs in Yorkshire, but the exact
area covered by the air craft and the
damage done by them has not been re-
ported.
The official announcement of the
raid is as follows:
"The commander-in-chief of the
home forces reports that five hostile
airships attacked the northeast coast
of England and the southeast coast of
Scotland tonight. A few bombs were
dropped in Yorkshire. No details are
as yet at hand concerning the casual-
ties and damage.
FRENCH CLUB HEARS LECTURE
Emerson Christie Talks on "Wild
Tribes of Philippines"
"The Wild Tribes of the Philip-
pines," was the subject of the last lec-
ture of the Cercle Francais series,
which was delivered yesterday after-
noon in Tappan hall by Mr. Emerson
Christie, of the Spanish department.
The lecture was illustrated with
slides made from photographs taken
by Mr. Christie himself while he was
with the United States Ethnological
Survey. Types of the various tribes
were shown, some belonging to the
Mohammedan groups and others to the
Christian groups. There were also
photographs of uncivilized types.
Mr. Christie spoke in French, ex-
plaining each of the pictures and add-
ding illustrative incidents from his
own experience.
GERMAN AND RUSSIAN AIRMEN

ACTIVE ON EASTERN FRONT
Berlin, May 2.-Air raids by both
German and Russian squadrons on
the eastern front are reported in the
German official statement. German
machines dropped bombs on Russian
positions on the Gulf of Riga and on
the Russian coast, while the Russians
retaliated by dropping bombs on a
German station at Windau, Courland.

GERMAN GOVERNMENT MAY PROPOSE
ARBITRATION IN ANSWER TO NOTE;
AMERICAN RECEPTION IS OUBTFI

(CHASE I. $ KES, '16
Who Plays the Part of Amiens, in
the Scene froi "As You Like It,"
in the Coming Shakespearean
Pageant.'
PAGEANT SEATS
SELLING RAPIDLY

Block to Ue Reserved for
Club; Chase Sikes and dlive
sig to Sing
PROGRAMS IN SOUVENIR

Pontiac
Hart-
FORM

So rapidly have the tickets been
selling for the Shakespearean pag-
eant, "The Queen's Progress," to be
presented in Hill auditorium under the
auspices of the Women's league, Fri-
day evening, May 5, that a capacity:
audience has been prophesied by those
in charge of the production.
A request was received late last
night from 'the Shakespeare club of
Pontiac, asking that a block of 32
tickets be reserved for them.
The seats range in price from 50
cents to $1.00. The entire lower floor
is reserved at the latter price, as well
(Continued on Page Six)
Writers Of Opera
Jusik Meet Today
Inaugurate Nev 'System in Writing
of Melodies; Scenarios
Due Saturday
In order to allot sufficient time to
next year's opera music writers, a
special meeting will be held at the
Union at 5:00 o'clock this afternoon.
With the new system in vogue, it is
believed that better results will be se-
cured, since mo%. of the music in
previous years was written just a few
weeks prior to the show.
This same rule has been applied to
the writing of the book, a large num-
ber of students being already engaged
in the writing of scenarios for next
year's production. Under this regula--
tion the entire show will be completed
by next fall, and work on the produc-
ing of the show will not be halted in
any way. .
Arthur Shupp, '17E, general chair-
man, requests that all those interested
in the music writing attend the meet-
ing this afternoon in order to receive
full instructions. The scenario com-
petition will close on Saturday, May
6, and all contributions must be hand-
ed in to the committee by that time.
Independence Amendment Is Defeated
Washington, May 2.-The Clarke
amendment, granting independence to
the Philippines, was defeated in the
House yesterday, 193 to 151.
Oratorical Association to Nominate
Nominations of officers for the Ora-
torical association will be made this
afternoon at its meeting in room 302,
north wing, at 4:30 o'clock. The meet-
ing is open to the public.

1SHIP THOUGHT TO BE LOST
Athens, via Paris, May 2.-It
is assumed in sipping circles
here that the Greek grain ship
Georgio, which left New York two
months ago with a crew of 25,
has been lost at sea. Vessel and
cargo are estimated to be worth
$600,000.
FRENCH TAE 15501YARDS
OF TRENCHES AT1TERUN
Feat of General Petain's Troops Arous-
es Great Interest in
Paris
Paris, May 2.-In the most successful
counter-attack delivered by General
Petain since the Crown Prince launch-
ed the Verdun offensive, French troop
captured 550 yards of German
trenches in the region of Doaumont.
Announcement of this victory late
today by the war department was sup-
Ilemented by a statement saying that
in a successful attack against the Ger-
man position on the slope of Dead
Man's Hill during Saturdav and Sun-
day, the french captured 1,000 yards
of German trenches, to a depth of
from 200 to 600 yards. No news from
the Verdun front since the beginning
of the Crown Prince's offensive has
aroused such interest in Paris.
WHAT'S GOINGONJ
i _
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Slightly warmer.
TODAY
4:00 o'clock-Special meeting of Phi
Alpha Tau, election of officers, Union,
4:00 o'clock-Burt Thomas, - car-
toonist for the Detroit News, lectures,
room 202, West hall.
4:30 o'clock-Oratorical Association
meeting, room 302 N. W.
5:00 o'clock-Meeting of prospective
Union opera writers, Union.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of the Pon-
tiac club, Union.
TOMORW
4:00 o'clock-Michigan vs. Syracuse,
baseball game, Ferry Field.
7:00 o'clock-Freshman Glee club
meets, McMillanhall.
7:30 o'clock-Meeting of the Poetry
club, Cercle Francais rooms.
8:00 o'clock-Dr. Ed. L. Stevenson
speaks on "The Expansion of Geo-
graphic Knowledge in the Middle
Ages," Natural Science auditorium.
8:0 o'clock-Prof. Hermann S.
Hering speaks in University hall, aus-
pices of Christian Science society.
8:00 o'clock-Girl's Lower Section
of Deutscher Verein meets, Verein
rooms, University hall.
U-NOTICES
8.00 A. X.-Tickets for Soph Prom
on sale at the Union, for sophomores
only.
3:00 o'clock--Fresh lit baseball
practice, south Ferry Field.
3.00 o'clock-Forester baseball prac-
tice, south Ferry Field.
3:30 o'clck-'17E baseball pratice,
south Ferry Field.
4:00 o'clock-'18E baseball practice,
south Ferry Field.
7:00 o'clock-Important rehearsal of
Pageant, Hill auditorium.
The Classical club will not hold a

meeting on Thursday.

UNITED STATES NOT TO DISCUSS
LOSS OF AMERICAN LIFE,
IS STATEMENT
REPLY MAY ARRIVE TOMORROW
Advices Say Berlin Is Conciliatory;
Herr Ton Jagow Attacked by
Frankfurter Zeitung
Washington, May 2.-Unofficial re-
ports have reached here indicating
that a proposal for arbitration may
form a feature of the German reply to
President Wilson's demand for an
abandonment of present methods of
submarine warfare.
Secretary of State Lansing declined
to " say how the United States would
receive such a proposal. It has been
stated authoritatively that the United
States would not arbitrate on ques-
tions involving American life. But
questions directly connected with loss
of life might be regarded as proper
subjects for further arbitration, it
was explained today. However, Ger-
many must first meet the basic de-
mand of the United States by either
abandoning her submarine campaign
against 'merchantmen, or by bringing
it strictly within the confines of inter-
national law.
Secretary Lansing is still without
news from Ambassador Gerard, but is
momentarily expecting a message out-
lining the result of the ambassador's
visit to the German emperor. Nothing
further has come from Berlin concern-
ing the date of Germany's official re-
ply, and the cabinet met today with
no new development to consider. Un-
official reports indicate that the Ger-
man note may reach here Thursday.
The situation presents a slightly
more hopeful aspect today in view
of press dispatches from Berlin indi-
cating that the German note has been
completed and that it was believed in
Berlin to avert the chances of a dip-
lomatic break. Some officials here
are inclined to interpret it as meaning
that Germany will at least temporarily
abandon her present submarine cam-.-
paign against commerce carriers in
the war zone, pending further negotia-
tions on the issue. Other officials,
however, were not so hopeful.
Berlin Said to Be Conciliatory
Amsterdam, via London, May 2. -
Latest advices from Berlin indicate
a certitude of conciliatory reply by
Germany to the American note. Every
newspaper with official ormsemi-official
standing prints editorials preparing
the people for changes, and arguing
the absurdity of Germany involving
herself in a new war by exasperating
the United States. Some official or-
gans even go so far as to suggest that
Foreign Secretary von Jagow be made
the scapegoat.
The Frankfurter Zeitung denounces
Dr. von Jagow, saying "his weak and
feeble hand cannot steer the ship of
state in storm." Other journals with
official connections point out that Ger-
many's present duty is to defeat Eng-
land's aims, which they claim are to
force the United States into a war with
Germany.
CHAPERONS ANNOUNCED FOR
PRE-PROM DANCE AT GRANGER'S
Prof. F. R. Finch and Mrs. Finch,
and Mr. F. A. Mickle and Mrs. Mickle,
will be the chaperons at the sfph en-
gineer "Pre-Prom" dance next Friday
night at Granger's.
The dance will be an informal af-
fair and several moonlight features
will be introduced. The dance will
last from 9:00 to 1:00 o'clock, and the

tickets are now on sale to the campus
at large at 50 cents.

THE

Hill
Auditori um

QUEE

'S

PROCRESS

Friday, May5
8 P. M.

A Shakespearean Pageant

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