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April 30, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-30

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T x E D AI LY
r 75e
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

SHIIGAN DAI__
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 30, 1916.

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN
PRICE FIVE CENTS.

VOL. XXVI No. 145.
RELAY QUARTET
FINISHES T HIRD
IN PENN, CLASSIC
3IUCKS. WISCONSIN, SIIATTERS
WORLD'S RECORD IN DIS-
(CUS THROW
SMrTH WINS 100 YARD DASH
Liglitnimg Fast Performances in Most
Events Result Also in Equaling
Three World's Records
(Courtesy Detroit Free Press)
Philadelphia, Pa., April 29.-Lightn-
ing fast performances in nearly all
the events made the last day's Penn
relay carnival one of the best ever
staged.
One world's record was shattered
to pieces, when Arlie Mucks of Wis-
consin, threw 'the discuss 145 feet,
11 1-2 inches, while three world's
records were equaled, during the
course of the afternoon's entertain-
ment.
In the two-mile relay, the big fea-
ture event of the day, Yale had to
equal the world's record to nose out
Chicago and Michigan, who, with the
Ithaca contingent, were the ruling fa-
vorites in this entry. The Blue run-
ners circled the course in 7 minutes
and 53 seconds, equaling the record
made by the Irish-American Athletic1
club of New York in 1910. Chicago
finished in the rear of Yale, with
Michigan in third position.
"Hal" Smith, of Michigan, the in-
tercollegiate champton in the dashes,
took first place in the century from
one of the fastest fields ever seen
at Philadelphia, in 10 2-5 seconds.
Teschner of Harvard was second, with

. ........

Germans Thrown
B ack at Verdun
'ree ,(~1At aek', inl Doimint ioilRegion
Repulsed by Artillery and M a-
ehl~e (4,1111 Fire
Paris, April 29.-Three attacks were
organized by the Germans last night
against the French positions in the
Verdun region. The first of these, on
the west bank of the Meuse, was frus-
trated before the attacking troops had
been able to leave their trenches. The
other two, on the east. bank of the
river, broke down under the fire of
the French artillery and machine guns.
The main attack on the east bank
of the river was made to the east of
the Thiaumont farm, south of the vil-
lage of Douaumont, and a little to
the west of the Douaumont-Fleury
road.
The French artillery and machine
guns held the Germans well back of
the French position, and the attack-
ing forces were driven back with
heavy losses.
The other attack on this side of the
river was made between the ruins of'
the villages of Douaumont and Vaux.
Today the activity in this region was'
confined to the artillery.
G1ermans Withdraw Verdun Batteries
Reports from various quarters are to
the effect that German heavy batter-,
ies are being withdrawn from the
Verdun front. Their destination is
not definitely known, but it is gener-
ally believed that some of them at
least are being sent to positions along
the British front, where increasing
activity seems to foretell a German of-~
fensive.
TOLEDO CLUB WINS
IIN! TENNIS CLASH
jiatch Hotly Contested All the Way;<
Captain Crawford Plays; Final
Score 5-4
- - -t
01110 TEA 31ORE EXPERIEN('EI)l
Michigan's Varsity tennis team wenti
down to defeat yesterday before the
more experienced Toledo Tennis club
team. Although the Maize and Blue
players had anticipated such a result,
yet they put up a hard fight all thec
way, as indicated by the close scorea
of 5-4.t
In spite of his recent illness, Cap-a
tain Crawford of the Varsity team put
up a plucky fight, even though het
lost in the singles to Cummings of
the Toledo aggregation. In thei
dotables, he and Mack defeated Cum-
mings and Corey, the Ohio city club's
best bets.I
Codd of the Varsity had a streak
of bad luck in his clash with Gard-
ner, losing the singles, but redeem-
ing himself in the doubles with Swit-
zer as his partner. Corey demonstrated
that he is the best man on the Toledoc
team. Thomas is another experienced
man, and Voorhees won the Middle
Bass tournament last year.
Michigan lost in the singles but won
two out of three of the double sets.f
Following are the summaries:

Smith of Wisconsin third.
tors and judges could see no
between the first four men',

Specta-
daylight
so close

TO VARSITY TEAM
BY SCORE OF 8-0
MILLER PITCHES MASTERFUL
GAME ALLOWING ONLY
ONE HIT
ANDRUS STARTS BUT IS WILD
Walterhouse Proves Star, Having Per-
fect Day Both at Bat and in
Field; Caswell Also Stars
Apparently anxious not to be out-
done in this fashion of presenting
Michigan with her baseball games on
a silver platter, which custom was
inaugurated earlier in the week by
Kalamazoo, the Case aggregation fell
obediently into line yesterday after-
noon and virtually handed Michigan
the contest. The figures were 8 and 0.
But for this generosity on the part
of the boys from the School of Applied
Science, Mlichigan might have experi-
enced considerable anxiety and con-
cern over the possible outcome, for
the Wolverines didn't earn a sagle
solitary run all afternoon long. But it
wasn't necessary. Case graciously
withdrew in favor of the home hopes
and that was all there was to it.
Captain Labadie and his men prefer
to win their games in more orthodox
and sportsmanlike fashion, but Case
was insistent and not wishing to give
offense to their guests, Ihe Wolverines
made the most of the opportunity.
To tell the truth, the visitors
couldn't ever have hoped for more
than a 0 to 0 draw at the best, for
Miller was airtight and master of the
situation at every turn. Andrus start-
bd the game but he was withdrawn in
the second in favor of the lanky box-
man. "Andy" didn't exactly retire un-
der a fusilade of hits either, but he
couldn't locate the platter as often as
is necessary under modern regulations
and remembering the horrible spec-
tacle of what this did to a certain
gentleman a few days ago, Lundgrun
hastened to withdraw his "wildman"
in favor of a twirler with better aim.
The first man that faced Miller sin-
gled, but he clamped on the screws
and breezed through the rest of the
game in capital fashion. Miller re-
ceived sparkling support from his.
mates, Walterhouse and Caswell con-
tributing several sparkling plays and
defensive maneuvers that brought the
rooters to their feet. Walterhouse
didn't confine his sensational stuff to
fielding, whacking out three singles
and scoring three runs, besides steal-
ing three bases. All in all, this enter-
prising youngster had a "large" day.
Brandell pulled one of the feature
plays of the day in the ninth inning
(Continued on Page Six)
JUNIOR PLAY BIG SUCCESS
I ___
Staged Before Large and Enthusiastic
Audience in Detroit
Playing before a large and enthu-
siastic audience of alumnae and
friends, the junior girls scored a de-
cided hit with their Detroit produc-
tion of "The Yankee Yogi," Saturday
night. The play was staged in the
newly erected MacAllister hall, and
was under the auspices of the Michi-
gan Women's Association of Detroit.
A number of changes in the produc-
tion were made since the Ann Arbor

performances, and the work of cast
and chorus was greatly improved.
Local alumnae entertained the col-
lege girls with a luncheon at noon
and dinner in the evening. More than a
hundred girls were housed through
the care and hospitality of the Detroit
committee, upon which many recently
graduated girls were active. The
troupe returns to Ann Arbor this aft-
ernoon.

'That.Band ' Dons
Sp ring Raiment
New Khaki Uniforms Excite Wonder
and Admiration of
Crowd
All spruced up in new khaki uni-
forms, looking as natty and trim as
a company of clothing store models,
the Varsity Band excited the wonder
and admiration of the assembled fans
when they swung into the diamond
yesterday afternoon promptly on the
hour of three. As the leader raised
his baton and the band crashed onto
the opening bars of "The Victors," the
entire body of onlookers rose to their
feet with a cheer and continued to ap-
plaud until the musicians had com-
pleted the circuit of the bleachers and
taken the places reserved for them.
The music rendered between the in-
nings of the game set the whole crowd
to whistling. It was new, it was
snappy, and it "got across" only as
music given by "That Michigan band"
can get across. Not a single mourn-
ful melody, not a single sentimental
syllable, but the quick, soul-stirring
kind that put new vim into the pitch-
er's arm, and new prowess behind the
batter's swing.
OBREGON INSISTS
NConference Between Mexican and U. S.
Generals Results hi No Def-
nite Agreement1
PLAN ANOTHER lEETING SOON
El Paso, April 29.-General Obre-
gon insists that only the withdrawalI
of the American troops would placate
the Mexican people. "If the invaders
refuse to withdraw, the United StatesI
will precipitate a condition that would1
mar the friendship of the two nations.
The responsibility would be on the
United States."
Generals Hugh L. Scott and Freder-
ick Funston, representing the Uniteda
States, and Generals Alvaro Obregon1
and Jacinto Trevino, representing thea
Carranza de facto government of1
Mexico, met in their first formal con-t
ference on the Mexican situation this
afternoon shortly after 5:00 o'clock.
At its conclusion, Generals Scott
and Funston hurriedly returned to the
American side of the line, admitting
that they had no statement to make.
But they asserted that the meeting had
been satisfactory and that there would,
be other meetings with Generals
Obregon and Trevino. It can be defi-
nitely stated that no agreement was
reached by the conference on the with-
drawal of the American army.
WORLD BEATER FROM MISSOURI
TO COMPETE IN FIELD GAMES
St. Louis, April 27.-The Missouri
Athletic association, St. Louis, will
send to the national track and field
games this summer a boy who bids
fair to be the world's greatest pole
vaulter. F. W. Floyd is the man ini
question. Floyd is completing his
course at the University of Missouri
now and he has done 12 feet 8 1-21
inches indoors.
In the indoor meet of the Kansas
City A. C., Floyd, competing for his

club. set a new world's record for an#
indoor vault on a board floor. The
former record was 12 feet 5 inches
and was held by Rockne of Notre
Dame. Floyd set a remarkable record
of 12 feet 8 1-2 inches. The' other
entries, the best of the Missouri Val-
ley conference schools, were long
since out of the running, and Floyd
tried for 13 feet. He cleared the bar
but his hand brushed it off as he fell.

SIN FEIN REBELS FIGHT H
m COMBAT WITH ROYAL
MILITARY CONTROLLING

,was the honored quartet. A dispute
between the judges was caused by the
close finish between Smith of Michi-
gan and Teschner, but ended with
the Wolverine captain drawing the de-
cision, after some argument.
The star of the whole meet, big
Mucks of Wisconsin, got the coveted
first position in the 16-pound shot put
when he separated himself from the
lead missile by a distance of 48 feet
11-2 inches. Behind the Westerner
came Richards, the star all-around
man of Cornell, while Tann of New
York university ended up in third
position.
When Cornell's quartet of milers
finished their respective distances in
the four-mile relay event, it was
found that another globe record was
equaled. The Ithaca lads succeeded
in accomplishing the four miles in 17
minutes, 51 2-5 seconds. This shades
the intercollegiate record made only
last year at the biggest college event,
of 17 minutes, 55 seconds. The form-
er intercolegiate record was made by
Princeton.
Not to be outdone by any one else
in the matter of equaling or shatter-
ing world or intercollegiate records,
Simpson of Missouri, did the 120-yard
hurdles in 15 2-5 seconds. The star
from the "show me" state tied his
own record made last year by so
leaping the sticks today.
GIVE COMEDY CLUB ELECTIONS
Sixteen Students Chosen for Member-
ship After Tryouts Friday
Sixteen students, eight men and
eight women, were elected to the Com-
edy club as a re'sult of the tryouts
held Friday in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall. The successful tryouts follow:
-1thel Hosmer, '17; Gladys Whelan,
1 ; Olive Hartsig, '17; E. E. Pardee,
'17; 1. C. llunter, '17; Gertrude Sar-
geant, '18; Eva M. Bowen, '18; J. S.
Kasberg&:, '18; Lois May, '18; C. J.
Myers, '18; Mary AMorse, '19; C. A.
Sisserson, '19; Mary Dodge Brown,
'19; Orva G. Williams, '19; W. K.
Faunce, '19; J. P. Wood, '19.
Monster Strike in New York'
New York, April 29.-Sixty thousand
coatmakers, 20,000 carpenters, 20,000
painters, 15,000 bakers, 40,000 metal
workers, 1,500 cement workers and
1.200 seltzer workers will strike on

******** * * * *
* *
* SUMMARY OF YESTERDAY'S
* RELAYS*
* Two-mile relay-Yale, 1; Chi.
cago, 2; Michigan, 3. Time, 7 *
* minutes 53 seconds. Equals *
* world's record. *
* 100-yard dash-Smith (M), 1; *
Teschner (H), 2; Smith (W) ,3 *
Time, 10 2-5 seconds.
* Shot put--Mucks (W), 1; Rich- *
ards (C), 2; Tana (N. Y. U.), 3. *
Distance, 48 feet 1 1-2 inches. *
* Discus-Mucks (W), 1; Hus *
* ton (1), 2; White (S), 3. Dis. *
tance, 145 feet, 11 1-2 inches. *
* Breaks world's record. *
Simpson (Mo) equals world's *
* record in 120 high hurdles. *
* Cornell breaks intercollegiate *
record, and equals world's ree. *
* ord in four-mile relay. Time, 17 *
minutes, 51 2-5 seconds. *
**
* -* * *.* * * * * * .* * *
EMERSON CIIIRISTY GIVES IL.
LUSTRATED LECTURE TUESDAY
Will Tell of Experiences in Collecting
Specimens for Philippine Museum
in Manila
"The Wild Tribes of the Philip-
pines" will be the subject of an illus-
trated lecture which will be given
in French by Mr. Emerson Christy
of the Spanish department next Tues-
day afternoon at 5:00 o'clock in Tap-
pan hall.
Fourteen years' residence in the
islands has made Mr. Christy eminent-
ly well qualified to speak about the
life there,
His work with the ethnological sur-
vey in the Philippines consisted in
writing a report on the various tribes
of the islands and collecting speci-
mens of their handiwork such as im-
plements, cooking utensils and weap-
ons for the Philippine Museum in
Manila. His experiences while with
the survey furnished the material
upon which he will base his talk. It
will be illustrated with 60 slides.
RUTH DOW AND LELAND DOAN
ANNOUNCE THEIR ENGAGEMENT
The engagement of Ruth A. Dow, ex-
'17, of Midland, to Leland I. Doan, '17A,
was announced last evening at dinner
at the Alpha Phi sorority, of which
Miss Dow is a member.
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Sunday colder.
TODAY
10:30 o'clock-John Mason Wells
speaks on "The Most Wonderful Thing
in the World," Baptist church.
6:30 o'clock --Prof. E. S. Imes,
"America and the Negro," First Bap-
tist church.
6:30 o'clock-Ozora Davis speaks,
"Y" meeting, Arcade theater.
7:30 . o'clock-George A. Gordon
speaks on "Man as Master of His Fate,"
Methodist church.
8:00 o'clock-I. B. Lipson, '94L, speaks
to Menorah society, Newberry hall.
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock-Phi Beta Kappa ini-
tiates meet, 101 Tappan hall.
5:00 o'clock-Keystone club meets,
Union.

8:00 o'clock-Prof. C. H. Van Tyne
addresses Sons of American Revolu-
tion.
U-NOTICES
Fresh lit baseball practice Monday
afternoon at 3:00 o'clock, south Fer-
ry Field.
Soph lit baseball practice, Monday
afternoon, 3:00 o'clock, on south Fer-
ry Field. All candidates requested to
report.
J-engineers will hold a baseball
practice tomorrow afternoon at 3 :30
o'clock.

MACHINE GUNS REAP HARVEST
Leaking Censorship Tells of Women
Accompanying Men in Attacks
on Dublin Postoffice
Dublin, April 29. - Amid roaring'
flames that threatened to sweep this
city of more than half a million in-
habitants, British troops and Sinn Fein
rebels engaged in a furious hand-to-
hand struggle until an early hour yes-
terday. The rebels, routed by the gov-
ernment troops, scurried away as
dawn broke upon the blackened ruins
of the Sinn Fein stronghold in the
heart of Dublin.
In their flight they were mowed
down by maxim and rifle fire and lost
heavily. It is now estimated that more
than 100 persons were killed or were
missing as the result of the four days
of street fighting.
The military apparently are now
in control of the situation, though the
disorders are not yet completely
quelled. A ring has been thrown
around the rebel force, who seem to
be disheartened by their failure to
rouse a general uprising throughout
Ireland.
Attempted outbreaks roused by the
(Continued on Page Six)
SOPH PROM PLANS
NEARLYMATURED"
Decoration Committee Promises Strik-
hig Color Effects; Men Wear
Informal Garb
TICKETS ON SALE WEDNESDAY
Under the direction of General
Chairman J. C. Barron, plans for the
annual Soph Prom, to be held Friday
evening, May 12, in the Armory, are
rapidly nearing completion.
As in past years, this year's Prom
will be of an informal character and
blue coats and white trousers will be
the order of the evening.
Philip B. Maher, '18A, has .been
placed in charge of the decorations,
and the unique design, together with
the novel color effects which he has
worked out, promises to beone of the
big; surprises of the evening.
Wright's eight-piece orchestra, un-
der the personal direction of 0. S.
Wright, will furnish the music for the
occasion, while the programs will be
the work of the E. A. Wright Co., of
Philadelphia,
Only 190 tickets will be placed on
sale, and the method of distribution
will be similar to that employed by the
J-Hop committee. The pasteboards
will go on sale to sophomores only,
Wednesday morning at the Michigan
Union, and will be limited strictly
to the second year men until Fri-
day evening.
DAVIS TO SPEAK AT ARCAE

AND TO
TROOPS;
SITUATIOI
N CORK CRUSHE
OF REINFORCE-
ROM ENGLAND

OUTBREAKS I
WITH All)
MENTS Fl

Singles
(T) d. Crawford (M), 6-3,

Cummings
6-8, 6-2.
Mack (M)
Corey (T)
Sherwood
4-6, 8-6.
Gardner
1-6, 6-4.
Voorhees
7-5.

S
M

d. Thomas (T), 6-2,
d. Switzer (M), 6-4,
(M) d. Crafts (T),

6-3.
6-4.
7-5'

Has

Traveled Extensively Among
Universities of West

(T) d. Codd (M), 6-3,
(T) d. Steketee (M), 6-1,
Doubles

Mack and Crawford (M) d. Cum-
mings and Corey (T), 10-8, 6-1.
Switzer and Codd (M) d. Vorhees
and Thomas (T), 6-2, 1-6, 6-4.
Crafts and Sawtelle (T) d. Sherwood
and Steketee (M), 6-4, 6-3.
British Surrender at Rut-el-Amara
London, April 29.-The British gar-
rison at Kut-el-Amara, 105 miles
southeast of Bagdad, has surrendered
to the Turks, it was officially an-
nounced today. The force surrender-
ing was composed of 2,970 British and
6,000 Indian troops.
General Townshend had been be-
sieged for more than 140 days when
he surrendered. All of the garrison's
guns and munitions were destroyed
henr a qurremder.

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
Rev. Dr. George A. Gordon
Pastor of the Old South Church. Boston
Subject: "Man as the Master of His Fate."
Tonight 7:30 Methodist Church Tonight 7:30

Ozora Davis, who speaks at the "Y"
Arcade meeting this evening at 6:3
o'clock, is an interesting as wel
as forceful speaker. He has appeared
in Ann Arbor before.
Mr. Davis is on the faculty of the
Chicago Theological Seminary, and
travels extensively among the variou
universities of the middle west. Ever
student in the university will be vi
tally interested in what Mr. Davis ha
to say.
Prof. E. S. Imes Lectures This Evenin
Prof. E. S. Imes, formerly profes
sor in Fisk University, will deliver
talk before the Baptist Young Pec
ple's Guild of the First Baptist churc
t 6:30 o'clock this evening on .th
subject, "America and the Negro." A
present, Professor Imes is engage
in special work in the graduate de
pirtment of this university.

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