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April 29, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-29

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T PEDAILY
T'E CAMPUS
VOL. XXVI. No. 144.

TRN
GAN

Phones:-Editorial 2414
Business 961
TELEGRAPH SERVICE B THE
NEW YORK SUN

a

rp.

4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

MICHIGAN TAKES
FIFTH PLACE IN
BIG RELAY RAcE
PENNSYLVANIA ESTABLIShES NEW
WORLWS IRE CORl) FOR ME)LEY
RELY RfAtE
WHITE WINS SHOT PUT EVENT
Berry of PeIinSy Iirt in Penitathlon,
in, Which Ife Entered
a Favorite
(Vourtesy of the Detroit Free Press)
Philadelphia, April 28.-Michigan
finished fifth this afternoon in the
medley relay race, Pennsylvania win-
ning. The Quakers were pushed, and
they established a new world's rec-
ord for the event, their anchor man
breasting the tape in 3:28 3-5.
Pennsylvania was represented by an
unusually strong team, the Quakers
having fast men in every position.
Lockwood, Dorsey and Meredith rank
among the greatest runners in colle-
giate competition and with a lightning
field entered, the Quakers stepped the
distance in remarkable fashion.
Chicago finished second, with Wis-
consin third and Princeton fourth, the
west contributing three of ' the five
winners. Captain Smith, Harold
O'Brien, Scofield and "Eddie" Carroll
represented the Maize and Blue. Smith
andl O'Brien ran 220 yards apiece, Sco-
field going a quarter, with Carroll fin-
ishing in the half-mile position.
White of Syracuse set a new inter-
collegiate mark in the 56-pound shot
put, heaving it 31 feet and 5 inches.
White is the 270-pound giant who has
been playing on the Orange football
team the past two seasons.
The pentathlon went to Berry of
Pennsylvania. Berry entered as a
strong favorite and his showing in
today's events justified this confidence.
Sinking Of Ships
Causes Big Loss

R"ra" JMobsters
Practice Postures
SpecItor Sets Pageant Mo Scene
in I'ae 1s°"to
Like the sound of distant thunder
conies the rmnble of the mob. Comes
the mob that threatens killing wth a
clamour that is thrilling, and their
footsteps loudly sounding like the
hoof-beats on the sod.
They are sturdy Roman brethren
as their speeches do portray, bearing
back the murdered Caesar (a chair
does, if you please, sir), when they
meet with noble Antony a-blocking up
their way.,
Mark, he stops and bids them listen
borrowing all their several ears.
Speaks of mighty Caesar's glory and
of Brutus, and the story makes them
vow to Heaven vengeance, midst the
flowing of their tears.
Then a little man with glasses and
and a prompt book in his hand, shouts,
"A little bit of pep there. Put some
ginger in your stop there. When it
comes to Shakespeare mob-seenes, you
are anything but grand."
For old Rome has been transplanted
to the stage in old U-hall, and the
citizens and sad gent are all work-
ing on the pageant, in the scene where
died the fellow who in three parts
divvied Gaul.
Allen Shoenfield.
CHOOSE NOMINEES
FOR UNIONOFIE
Election flay to Occur the Last Day
in May; Other Nanies Iay
le Placed on Ballots
I)ATE WILL BE ANNOUNCEI) LATER
Nominations for Michigan Union of-
fices for the year 1916-17 were made
public bythe nominating committee
last evening as follows:
For pre sident:
Staats M. Abrams
Kemp S. Burge
: Glenn M. Coulter
For recording secretary:
Lee E. Joslyn
John W. Langs
Harold A. Taylor
For vice president:
From literary college
A. S. Hart
Howard G. Muzzy
Edwin B. Palmer
From engineering college
Robert W. Collins
John W. Neumann
Gordon Smith
From law school
Kenneth Barnard
James M. Barrett
Glenn A. Howland
'From medic school
Joseph A. Darnall
George McClure
From combined colleges
C. B. Mandeville
For faculty members of Board of
Directors:
Dean H. M. Bates
Dr. Reuben Peterson
Prof. William A. Frayer.
Election will occur on the regular
campus election day the last week in
May. The names of additional can-
didates for any of the above offices
will be placed on the ballots, provid-
ed a petition containing the names of
25 members of the Union is filed with
the recording secretary before 9:00,

o'clock A. M. of the fourth lay pre-
ceding election. The date of election,
will be announced in the near future.

LUNOGREN MVAKES
CHANGES IN LINE-
UP AGAINST CASE
AN DEtSON WILL START (AME AT
THIRD, WITH C'ASWELL
3OVEID TO FIRST
HOEHM MAY ACT ASBACKSTOP

Andrus to Start Today's Contest
He Displays Sufficient
Control

if

i:
I.,
.d'.

* ** * * * *
fichigan Batting Order
Niemann, right field.
Caswell, first base.
Labadie, left field.
Brandell, center field.
Walterhouse, shortstop.
Anderson, third base.
Smith, second base.
Dunne or Roehm, catcher.
Andrus or Miller, pitcher.
Coach * n* * --- * -n
Coach Lundgren announced

* *
*
*
*
*1
* '
*
*
*
two

N umber of Lives Lost Fixed at
While 701 Men Are Saved
from Russell

121

London, April 28.-Loss of the Brit-
ish battleship Russell, and a large pa-
trol boat, the capture of an English
trawler and destruction or a German
submarine, were announced today.
The loss of life is fixed at 124 men,
who are missing from the Russell.
The Russell was sunk by mines in the
Mediterranean.
The German submarine was sent
down off the east coast, the British
patrol boat was destroyed and the
trawler captured by German boats on"
the Doggerbank.
Rear-Admiral Frement, Captain Wil-
liam Bowden Smith, 24 other officers
and 676 men were saved when the Rus-
sell went down. About 18 men were
captured by the British when the
German submarine was sunk.
POSTPONE OHIO CLUB DANCE
Date Changed to )onday, May 29;
Taickets on Sale Now
The Ohio club dance, which was to
have been held next Tuesday, May 2,
has been postponed till May 29. In-
asmuch as this date precedes Decora-
tion Day, at which time there will be
no school, the committee in charge
expects a large number to be on hand.
Tickets already sold will be good
fo that date and those wishing tick-
ets ,an get them from C. R. Bloomer,
'17E. Fi cher's banjorime-saxophone
orchestra will provide the music.
GR ) 1 RAPIDS CL B TO TAKE
HIKE TO YPSI THIS AFTERNOON
A hike to Ypsi and perh'ns to points
farther est will be the undertaking
of the Grand Rapids club this after-
noon. The hike will start after a
regular buKness meeting of the club
at the Union at 1:00 o'clock.
Ralph C.-nger, '13, president of the
Michigami P lumni association of Grand
Rapidse - l. address the meeting to
expl in the connection between the
lja ii association of .Grand Rapids
and the Granl Rapids club of the

positive changes in the lineup for to-
day's bame with Case. with the pos-
sibiltiy of a third.
Anderson will start the game at
third, with Caswell moved over to
first, while the uncertainty lies behind
the bat. "Morrie" Dunne is tempor-
arily handicapped by a bad ankle, and
if he is not in shape to open today's
fray against the Clevelanders, "Rum-
ine backstop.
The coach stated last night that
Andrus would start today's contest if
he exhibited anything that even re-
motely resembled control when he
warmed up. Andrus has been wild,
but if he displays any certainty in his
(Continued on Page Six)
Report Air Raids
On Western Front
1trench Squadron Drops 18 Bombs on
La Mardie Stailon In
the Woevre
Paris, April 28.-Numerous air raids
along the western front in which Ger-
man planes, including a Fokker, were
brought down, were reported by the
war office today.
A French squadron dropped 18
bombs on La Marche station in the
Woe" re. One German plane attacked
by the 'rench dropped near Douau-
mont, badly damaged, and another fell
near Mont Sauton. A French aviator
while piloting a Nieuport monoplane
defeated a Fokker, which fell behind
the German lines.
The Germans dropped shells at in-
frc ~uent intervals during the night in
the region of Avocourt-Esnes and
Froncey. A dispatch from Marseilles
reports the arrival there of a further
contingent of Russian troops, the
number of which is not given.
BAND IN NEW UNIFORMS TODAY
Varsity )fiis s to Wear Khaiki
Suits at tane
"We'll show the Brown and White
what real music sounds like," says
Captain Wilson, director of the Var--
sity band, and the musicians vouch
that "Cap's" reputation for veracity
will be upheld.
The khaiki-clad band men will line
up in front of University hall at 2:15
this afternooi, ready to regale the
fans on Ferry Field with an entirely
new repertoire.
All bandmen who have not received
their khaiki uniforms may" obtain
them at Hill auditorium between 10:00
and 12:00 this morning. All blue
overcoats must be turned in at this
tin e.
'i'TIilISH TROOPS ANNIHILATE
FOUR BRITISh SQUADRONS
Berlin, April 2*.-Tu'rish troops
annihilated four British cavalry squad-
ro'i, about 800 men, in a battle April
23, near Quatia, about 25 miles east
of the Suez canal. This information

Russian Choir
Scores Success
All Numbers Unaccompanied, Which
Added to Effectiveness
of Voices
Hill auditorium was filled to its ca-
pacity last night when the Russian
Cathedral Choir of New York City, in
their striking vestments of red and
black, gave what was considered one
of the best exhibitions of perfect en-
semble singing ever heard in this
city.
The choir, which consists of 21 boys
and eight adults, and is considered
by critics to rank second only to the
Cathedral Choir of Moscow, is con-
ducted by Ivan T. Gorokhoff.
All of the numbers were unaccom-
panied, which fact added much to the
effectiveness of the perfectly blended
voices and the delicate shadings
brought out under the baton of the
able director. The pianissimo work
of the choir was most extraordinary
and the perfect phrasing and enuncia-
tion left nothing whatever to be de-
sired.
The entire program was made up of
Russian ecclesiastical music, which is
considered the finest sacred music in
the world, being characterized by
splendid part writing and well blend-
ed harmonies.
At the end of the program they sang
"America," which was followed by the
Russian National Anthem.
This choir is appearing only in uni-
versity cities and will be heard in
Chicago, Madison, Evanston and Ith-
aca before returning to New York.
BORDOER GATHERING
Generals Obregon, Funston and Scott
Will Confer at El
Paso Today
El Paso, April 28.-With General
Alvaro Obregon and his staff in Juarez
and Generals Hugh L. Scott and
Frederick Funston at El Paso, the
stage was set tonight for a confer-
ence between representatives of the
Mexican and American governments
on the military situation in Mexico.
Generals Scott and Funston arrived
at San Antonio at 5:30 o'clock, were
met by General George Bell and his
staff and held an informal reception
at the station. The two generals re-
mained on their car tonight.
The first act of the conference is
expected to be staged Saturday morn-
ing when General Scott and General
Funston will pay their formal call
upon General Obregon in the historic
old customs house in Juarez. The
conference proper will then follow the
return of this formal call by Generals
Obregon, Trevino and their staff.
General Obregon and his party ar-
rived in Juarez this morning. When
questioned as to any break or differ-
ences with General Carranza, Gen-
eral Obregon laughed. "I am very
earnest," he said, "that you state em-
phatically for me 'that there have been
no differences between the first chief
and myself and there is no reason for
there being any break."
Herrera Demonstrates Loyalty to
Cause
Arriving on the military train and
presumably coming to the border to
demonstrate the loyalty of the Her-
reras to the constitutionalist cause,
was Joe de La Luz Herrera, mayor
of Parral, who suffered many indig-

nities during the trouble between the
populace of that town and the Ameri-
can troops. Senor Herrera is the
father of General Luis Herrera now
(Continued on Page Six)
TO PRESENT PLAY AT DETROIT
Cast and Chorus of "The Yankee Yogi"
to Leave This Morning

KISER TO CONVEY HIS APPEAL TO
WILSON THRUG MBASSADOR GER-
'RA IN ORDER TO AVERT CRISIS

CARRANZA'S GOVERNMENT*
MAY FALL,_SAYS REPORT
European Embassies Get Evidence
That Indicates Crisis in
Mexico City
Washington, April 28.-Reports re-
ceived here within the last 24 hours,
at several of the European embassies
have aroused grave apprehension in
regard to the Mexican situation.
These reports were to the effect that
the Carranza government is on the
verge of a complete collapse and that
conditions in and around Mexico City
are more threatening than they have
been at any time since the overthrow
of Porfirio Diaz.
Fearing that harm might come to
their nationalities in Mexico, if the
source of the information became
known, the diplomats receiving the re-
ports have requested that their names
be not disclosed. It is known, how-
ever, that at least one of the ambas-
sadors concerned turned over to the
state department today a full trans-
cript of the information he had re-
ceived.
Report Says Mexico on Point of Revolt
This report declares that all of Mex-
ico is on the verge of an uprising
against the Carranza government. It
states that while the primary cause
of the crisis lies in the complete de-
moralization of all forms of industry,
a scarcity of food and the worthless-
ness of Mexican currency, resentment
against Carranza for permitting Amer-
ican forces to enter and remain in
Mexican territory is the particular
grievance on which the enemies of
Carranza are pinning their hope for
a general outbreak against this rule.
Villa, the report shows, is fast as-
suming in the eyes of the Mexican
populace the figure of a national hero.
Availing themselves of this fact, in-
triguers at the national capitol and
in the very household of Carranza
are plotting for his overthrow. It is1
said that Carranza is in imminent dan-
ger of assassination.
Famous Author and Dramatist Dead
New York, April 28.-Stephen Fiske,
76 years old, author, dramatist, and
once widely known as a journalist
and war correspondent, died here3
Thursday. He acted as war corres-
pondent for the New York Herald
during the Civil war. Later he found-
ed the New York Dramatic Mirror.

GERMAN LEADER AND PEOPLE RE-
GARD WAR AS "AN ITNTIUNK-
ABLE CALAMITY"
US, SHIPPING NOT MENTIONED
No Evidence That Emperor Will Dis-
cuss Possible Concessions
in iessage
Washington, April 28.-The true sig-
nificance of Ambassador Gerard's vis-
it to army headuqarters, where he will
have an audience with the German au-
have an audience with the German
emperor was explained today in offi-
cial advices from Berlin,
The visit has been made at the em-
peroras reuest in order to permit him
to convey through Ambassador Gerard
an earnest appeal to President Wilson
to maintain friendly relations with
Germany. No discussion of the sub-
marine issue between the emperor and
Ambassador Gerard is expected. De-
tails of the negotiations and the fram-
ing of the German reply to the Amer-
ican note are still in the hands of
Chancellor Dr. von Bethmann-Holl-
weg.
The German Kaiser's message to
Mr. Gerard will deal primarily with
the necessity of averting war between
two friendly people over what German
officials here describe as a "technical
interpretation of international law,"
which could be satisfactorily adjusted
by arbitration or by an international
tribunal.
It is expected by those in touch with
Berlin that the emperor will appeal
directly to President Wilson's firm be-
lief in the doctrine of peace and arbi-
tration, while adroitly indicating that
severance of diplomatic relations will
be universally regarded in Germany as
a preliminary to actual hostilities.
Tlegards War With IT. S. Unthinkble
The emperor is understood to re-
gard war between the Americautpeo-
ple and the German people as "a
unthinkable calamity." He will em-
phasize the years of unbroken friend-
ship which have happily characterized
the relations of the two peoples and
at the same time contrast the conse-
quences which would result from a
diplomatic break over the submarine
issue, which he regards as not of
vital interest to American citizens,
He will take the position, it is.runder-
stood, that neither the German people
nor the American people want war and
that it is the solemn duty of those in
charge of the destinies of these peo-
ples to avoid such a calamity. He will
furthermore give Mr. Gerard assur-
antes, it is understood, that the im-
perial government is ready to end the
world conflict any time the Allies are
ready to abandon their campaign of
"crushing the Fatherland" and he
will express the belief that the end of
the war is already in sight.
There is nothing in the advices from
Berlin which indicate that the emperor
will discuss possible concessions wich
Germany may feel able to make to
meet the American demand. The ef-
fect of the action taken by the Ge-
man emperor and his readiness to
send an earnest plea by Mr. Gerard is
already noticeable here. Confidence
was felt at the German embassy de-
spite the reports from Berlin that the
German people now show a determined
unwillingness to sacrifice the effect-
iveness of the German submarine cam-
paign against Great Britain.
No progress is reported from Ber-
lin in the negotiations concerning the
reply to the so-called ultimatum. Presi-
dent Wilson and his cabinet met to-
day and discussed the submarine is-
sue briefly. Secretary Lansing said
he had received no advices which
changed the situation.

SEES COLLEGE GAME BUT'T MAY
LOSE HIS FOOT AS A RESILT

WHAT'S GOING ON

1

Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Slowly rising temperature.
TODAY
10:00 o'clock A. 3I.-Soph engineers
vs. J-engineers, Ferry Field.
1:00 o'clock-All-Fresh vs. Albion
baseball game, Ferry Field.
2:1i o'clock-Varsity band meets in
front of U-hall.
3:00 o'clock-Michigan vs. Case base-
ball game, Ferry Field.
7:00 o'clock-Upper Room Bible
class meets, 444 South State street.
7:30 o'clock-Regular meeting of
M. S. N. C. club, Newberry hall.
9:00 o'clock - University dance,
Packard academy.
9:00 o'clock-Union dance, Union.
TOlORROW
10:30 o'clock-John Mason Wells
speaks on "The Most Wonderful Thing
in the World," Baptist church.
6:30 o'clock-Ozora Davis speaks,
"Y" meeting, Arcade theater.
7:30 .o'clock-George A. Gordon
speaks on "Man as Master of His Fate,"
Methodist church.
8:00 o'clock-I. B. Lipson,'94L, speaks
to Menorah society, Newberry hall.

TO HOLD PRE-PROM DANCE
A faiir to Be (iven on hity 5; Announce
Ticket Sellers
All plans have been made by the
soph-engineer social committee for a
"Pre-Prom" dance to be given on May
5 at Granger's academy. Fischer's
orchestra will play and the dance will
be informal, the committee hoping that
a large crowd will be present.
Dancing will last from 9:00 to 1:00
o'clock and tickets can be procured
from Hough, Langley, Dudley, Brill,
Hibbard, Livingstone, Knowlson, Mc-
Kee, Schacht, Lemmon, Kimberly,
VanBrundt, Goodspeed and Krabs. The!
nominal fee of 50 cents per couple
will be chrged.

Almost a hundred girls will leave
Ann Arbor this morning for Detroit,
where they will present the Junior
Girls' Play, "The Yankee Yogi." The
production is under the direction of
the University of Michigan Women's
association of Detroit, and will be
staged at MacAllister hall.
Plans have been made by the De-
troit alumnae 'to entertain the entire
cast and chorus. Two special cars will
take the troupe, and bring them back
Sunday morning.

Kalamazoo, Mich., April 28. - The
college spirit of Paul Butler, son of

a well known local doctor, may cause
U-NOTICES him the los of his right foot. While
Senior lits get canes today at Hal- riding a freight to Ann Arbor to see
her's jewelry store, 9:30 to 10:00 and the baseball game between Kalamazoo
from 1:30 to 2:30 o'clock. college and the U. of M., one foot was
Fresh lit baseball practice today, crushed between 'bumpers. Jumping
9:00 o'clock to 11:00 o'clock, South off the train near Chelsea, he walked
Ferry Field. New material in every two miles suffering intense pain, and
line wanted. -- went on to Ann -Arbor hospital.

was conveyed in an official report is-
sued by the Turkish war department
undr date of April 27.

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