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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 28, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OVEREOR
WT AL K~ OVI K WOMEN
A
Few
Snappy r
Ser
VEP S~tyleS No. 1973 Price $3.5

i M IInI OSIl - . -i 1

ii

Although we have been offered
$50 per Pound for Elon Developer
which we could get along without, but which gives better results for
AMATEUR FINISHING
we refused the offer because we are determined to give to you, Mr.
Amateur, the best results obtainable.
THE WONDER IS that we do not charge any more than the other
fellow who uses a make-shift developer. We foresaw this condition and
"safety first", we believed in PREPAREDNESS.
THE RESULT IS: When you want Peace Time Fiuishing in War
Times Go to 'LYNDON

DELTA

CAFE

"Art is loiig, lf .~~~

Sunday Evening Luncheon
Fifty Cents

5:30 P.M.to8 P. M.

No. 1786 Price $5.00
White Reignskin Cloth
white Ivory Sole andl Heel

White Reignskin Cloth
White Ivory Sole and Heel

TR, DISCUSSES
WILSONPOLICIS
Says He Will Back Voiernment in New
York Speech Before Metho-
dist Union

r tatir
Wed. &

ees G RCK Wek
k sa. GA RICK April 24
DETROIT
EMILY STEVEN S in
"THE UNCHASTENED WOMAN"

SPECIAL FEATURE
Mandolin Trio Orchestra
Reservations Enable us to give Better Service

Did you ever hear of a misfit Walk-Over?
This means competent fitting.
WALK-OVER BOOT SHOP
115 S. MAIN ST.

Shows at 3:oo, G:30 8:00, 9:30

ATTENTION! AMATEURS!

I'

wai
S e
713 E. University

Makes enlargements ( black
and white, sepia, o r hand-colored )
from negatives or from prints, new or
old. You will be pleasantly surprised
at the results he secures.

Y . ....... i

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

4

-Sul - Iffs""n

I

t

75c

for the balance of
the year

MAILED

OR

LOCAL

I

Offices: Press Bldg.
Maynard St.

RAPS HYPHENATED AMERICANS
New York, April 27.-Ex-President
Theodore Roosevelt discussed plainly
the policy of the administration in re-
gard to Mexico and Germany in a
speech made before the Methodist So-
cial Union of New York at the Bilt-
more hotel last night. He stated:
"I will most cordially back up this
government to the very limit to which
it is necessary 'to go in order to as-
sert our rights and the rights of hu-
manity as. regards Germany or Mexi-
co or any other power."
Mr. Roosevelt then declared, "We
can play the greatest part on behalf
of peace that any nation has ever yet
played. We cannot play it by tread-
ing in the footsteps of China, not by
showing that we have lost the iron
that was in the blood of our fathers,
not by permitting America to become
a jangling knot of old world nation-
alities where the descendants of the
old stock are too feeble either to
stand up for themselves or for any-
one else.
"We can take our permanent place
as a great nation only if we realize
that we are a separate nation, akin to
but distinct from all the people of
Europe. We must set our faces like
flint against the hyphenated American
in all its forms, against men who
would seek to manage our political
life in accordance with the real or
fancied interests of the several coun-
tries from which they or their fore-
fathers came."
The speaker then referred to the
present situation in regard to Ger-
many, and made the following state-
ment:
"Fourteen months have gone by
since as a nation we informed Ger-
many that we would hold her to a
'strict accountability' if she did what
she said she would do as regards sub-
marine warfare. Germany did not be-
lieve that we meant what we said and
for 14 months our action showed that
we did not mean what we said and
'strict accountability' turned into 14
months of conversation on our part.
"Yet for 14 months after making
that declaration, and with, during
those 14 months, outrage after outrage
committed against us, of which the
outrage as regards the Lusitania was
merely the most conspicuous, we have
not prepared in any shape or way to
make good our words. And now we
find that the lack of preparedness, the
lack of decision and fortitude on our
part have resulted, not, as our paci-
fist friends insisted, in increasing the
likelihood of peace, but in bringing us
to the verge of the gravest possible
crisis.
"If we get peace now, it will be
proof positive that firm decision 14
months ago would have saved the lives
of many thousands of non-com-
batants."
01R. ANGEidL LEAVES RARE
LAW BOOKS TO UNIVERSiTY
(Continued from Page One)
daughter, Sarah Caswell Angell, of
Chicago.
To James Rowland Angell, of Chi-
cago, was given a silver soup-tureen
and salver presented to Dr. Angell
by the citizens of Providence, R. .
A set of three diamond studs and a
set of sleeve buttons made in China
and bearing Dr. Angell's name in
Chinese was bequeathed to a grand-
son, James Angell McLaughlin.
James Burrill Angell, I, a grand-
son. received the gold watch and chain
given to Dr. Angell by friends in Bur-
lington, Vdrmont.
Another grandson. James Warous

Angell, was given the silver butter
boat presented Dr. Angell by Thomas;
Boynton Ives. .
William P. Angell, of Chicago, a
brother, received a legacy of $1,000.
Alexis Caswell Angell is named exe-
cutor of the will, which was witnessed
July 14, 1913, by President Harry' B.
Hutchins and Secretary Shirley W.
Smith.

Fri.-28-M ne. Olga Petrova in "Play.
iiig withDire."
Sat. - 29 -Victor Tingo's "Les Miser-
ables"-r parts. Special music. 25c,
children igc. "Trip Around the
world." 4.
Orpheum Theatre
The Home of Paramount and
Triangle Photoplys
Matim-ees, 2:o, 3:15 Evening, 6:45, :o
9:15 saturdays-Holidays Continuous
TODAY -- Marguerite Clark in "Out of
the Drifts." Evening, i5c.
TOMORROW - Bessie harriscale i n
"Honor's Altar." Also Mack Swain in
a Triangle Comedy, "His Auto Ruin-
atin." Evening, 15c.
THE FAMOUS
Cox Sons and Vining
z CAPS, GOWNS AND HOODS
for all College Degrees
may be ordered now from
MARTA ll'A LAW' ES ABIHHEl)
ALL OVER IIELAND AS RE-
SUIT OF SPREAD OF REVOLT
I ( OTliER PARTS OF COUNTRY
(Cotin uaed froll Page One)
continue to hold important public
buildings. It was announced that in
addition to troops already despatched
to Ireland to cope with the situation,
others were being sent and that Major-
General Sir John Maxwell, who for-
merly commanded the British forces
in Egypt, was leaving this afternoon
for Ireland. The general has been
given plenary powers, under martial
law, over the whole country. There
seems to be no doubt that the rising
in Ireland had been carefully planned
for Easter Sunday, when the plotters
probably counted on many officials and
members of the military taking a holi-
day. The German naval sally against
the English coast towns and the Zep-
pelin raid apparently were a part of
the general scheme.
Censorship Raised
With Dublin more nearly quiet to-
day, the government decided to raise
the bar of censorship on the outbreak
in the Irish capital. On a motion of
adjournment in the house of commons,
the home secretary announced that
arrangements have been made for a
newspaper correspondent to go to Ire-
land and watch the course of events.
Only such information as might be of
advantage to the entente allied corps
would be censored, he said.
The only information received from
Ireland today, the home secretary said,
was that over considerable districts
matters harl been quiet. Nothing had
been received from the disturbed dis-
trict. Full reports of the course of
events would be communicated to the
public between now and the next meet-
ing of the house on Tuesday, he prom-
ised.

EXPERIENCE

The Sign of Satisfaction

110 EAST LIBERTY ST REET

RAPID SHOE REPAIR SHOP

r
.

-1

..
{

MICHIGAN1 TECHNIC OUT
FOR NEW SUBSCRIPTIONS
Engineering Magazine Starting Stren-
nous Campaign to Enlarge
Circulation
One of the most strenuous subscrip-
tion campaigns in its history, has just
been launched by the Michigan Tech-
nic, the engineering quarterly pub-
lished by the Engineering society. Ef-
forts will be confined mainly to the en-
gineering department faculty and the
senior class, and from present indi-
cations the campaign promises to be
a complete success. A series of post-
ers will be put on bulletin boards, a
large clock will be placed at the head
of the !main stairway of the Engineer-
ing building, indicating the number of
subscriptions obtained day by day, and
a table will be placed at the same loca-
tion, at which subscriptions will be
received, to assist in the campaign.
The entire campaign, which will
continue until next Thursday night,
has been organized by C. A. Hart, '18.
The campaigning proper, however,
will be conducted by two teams of
staff tryouts working under the lead-
ership of CarlW. Porter, '19, and Rob-
ert Erley, '18. The individual ob-
taining the most subscriptions w-ill be
awarded a Technic fob.
A pamphlet entitled the "Senior Ex-
tra" has been published, giving some
of the strongest arguments in favor1
of the magazine. These will be dis-
tributed among the seniors. Special
rates have been made on two and threet
year subscriptions, the price of thet
former being only $1.50, and the latter
$2.00. One year's subscription is onet
dollar, while the last issue this May
will be given free with all new sub-
scriptions,

POP*

PHONE
1459-J

You will always be assured of bright,
clear pictures if you have your develop-
ing and finishing done by
DAINES & NICKELS

SE VENT E EN

YEARS

GOVERNO0R FERIS MAKES
A RBOR DAROCAMATION
Sets Aside Friday, hlay 5, to Be Ob-
served in Interest of Tree
Culture
In accordance with the annual cua-
tom, Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris
.has made public his Arbor and Bird
Day Proclamation, which decrees that
Friday, May 5, shall be observed by
the people of Michigan in the interest
of tree culture, and the preservation
of our feathered friends.
The proclamation is as follows:
"Long years ago a loyal Michigan
citizen planted hundreds of maples
on-either side of the highway fronting
his large farm. These trees are now
large and beautiful. These trees did
not affect the productivity of his
farm. When he planted these trees
he had in mind the thousands of men,
women and children who would re-
ceive real joy from his gift to this
'main traveled road.' Some day both
city and country will come to appre-
ciate the importance of tree-planting
along the highways, on the hillsides,
in yards and in parks.
"Trees without birds would get
lonesome. Trees and shrubs are the
natural homes of many of our birds.
These winged creatures are man's best
friends. They nqt only destroy mil-
lions of destructive insects, but they
appeal to man's sense of beauty, in
their plumage, in their song and in
their graceful movements.
"The trees and the birds teach 'mu-
tual aid,' teach a universal poetry,
teach the beneficence of -the Father
of us all."

WE CALL and

DELIVER

ORAORY CONSTTTION
ADMITS NEW DELEGATE
W1Oimell andt3 l Ras lEngineers Will Now He
Allowed on Board; New Offi-
cers Provided for
The admission to the Oratorical
board of women delegates from the lit-
erary classes and delegates from the
engineering classes are two marked
changes provided in the new consti-
tution proposed at a special meeting
of the board yesterday afternoon. Un-
der the new constitution, which will be
voted upon by All the members of the
Oratorical association in about two
weeks, there will be a division of the
legislative and executive functions of
the association.
The legislative power will be vest-
ed in the Oratorical board, composed
of one man and one woman from each
literary class, one representative from
each engineering class, and from each
law class, the four debating society
delegates, the professors and instruct-
ors of oratory, and the four student
officers, who are elected by the stu-
dent body at large. Provision is made
for the representation of other schools
and colleges of the university when
sufficient demand arises. The board
will hold monthly meetings.
The executive committee will con-
sist of the president and secretary of
the association, two student members
elected by the Oratorical board, and a
new faculty officer, called the finan-
cial manager, who will have chaifge of
expenditures authorized by the board.
Another new officer is the contest
director, a faculty man .appointed by'
the head of the oratory department.
A new method of nominating officers
is also provided, under wvhich there
will be a nominating committee, elect-
ed by the board. There will still be
opportunity to petition for the nomin-
ation of men as previously.
Send The Daily home. 75a for the
rest of the year.**

I

3-7and8:39P. M.
High Class Photo-Plays
TODAY
Joseph Kilgour and Virginia
Pears.a in
"The Writing on the Wall"
SATURDAY
Mary FulleWr in "The Strength of
the Weak"
ALL SEATS 10 cents
Stop! Look!Listen!
Before signing up for any
selling work this summer learn
about the
FULILE
ADVERTISING
PROPOSITION
Ask any of these men around
the Campus.
C. A. REID, Phone 1324-J
C. C. WOLCOTT, Phone 144
GEO. E. 9ISHER, Phone 1551
J. R. WELTON, Phone 990-J
Special advantages this week.

G V I1 1 A ES i FORI A RMY
QCAI'T RS TO SEE KAISER
(('oiithi ed iront Page One)
ing to Secretary of State Lansing, who
remained without advices as to Ger-
many's reply to the President's de-
mand for "an immediate abandonment
of present methods of submarine war-
fare." The American reply has now
been under consideration a week, and
intimations are that another week will
elapse before Berlin is definitely
heard from.
St. Thomas Alte-r, Society will hold
an Easter party Friday evening at
parish hall. Admission 25c, music by
tho Girls' orchestra. Students cordi-
ally invited. apr28

Patronize Daily advertisers.

*1

k J R

ANN ARBOR MAY F'E STIVAL
FOUR DAYS SIX CONCERTS MAY 17, 18,*19, 20
SOLOISTS-Hempel and Hinkle, Sopranos; Braslau and Matzenauer, Contraltos; Kingston and
McCormack, Tenors; Amato and Werrenrath, Baritones; Holmquist, Bass; Kinder, Organist.
CONDUCTORS-Stanley and Stock.
ORGANIZATION --The Choral Union, Children's Chorus, The Chicago Synphony Orchestra
CHORAL WORKS-Paradise Lost (Bossi), Children at Bethlehem (Pierne) and Samson ud
Delilah (Saint-Saens).
COURSE TICKETS-On sale up to May 6, at $4.oo and $5.oo each. ( .co and $2.10 if
cover coupon is exchanged.
SINGLE CONCERT TICKETS-On sale on and after May 8, at $.oo and $1 5o each.
Special announcements with programs and complete information will be inma.iled upon request.
CHARLES A. SINK. Secretary.

Pitronize Daily Advertizers.

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