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April 28, 1916 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THEl MICHIGAN DAILY,

.__.-.--

*

OR. EDWARD STEVENSON
TO GIVE TWO LECTURES
Will Speak 31ay 4 and 5 under Avspi-
ces of Geography and (eoiogy
Department
Dr. Edward L. Stevenson, secretary
of the Hispanic society of New York
City, will be the last lecturer of the
series which has been held under the
auspices of the department of geology
and geography. IHe is to give two lec-
tures in the auditorium of the New
Science building. ,
The first lecture will come at 8:00
o'clock, May 4. It will be on the
subject of "The Expansion of Geogra-
phic Knowledge and lt: Iecord as
Given by. Map-Makers." On May 5,
at 4:15 o'clock, Dr. Stevenson will
speak on "Early Discovery and Ex-

I II I I

SENIORS ATTENTION!
WE are now taking the measures of all
the members of the 1916 classes for
caps and gowns. C The most conkeniently
located place on the campus.
Henry & Company
713-715 North University Avenue

in

Letter To Prof. S. J. Zowski Shows
Starving Condition Of Polanders

ploration in the New World as Repre- That the people of German Poland
sented by Contemporaneous Map- are slowly starving to death is plain-
Makers. ly ev id(-el rom a letter received by
P f arcf. S. J. Zowski, of the engineering
DAVIS SPEAKS AT T MEETING 'e""rtn"ent, from a sister living in
the province of Posen, C-erman Pol-
and.
Prestdent of Chicago Theological Sent- "I do not know if you can imagine
Mary Talks Sunday our miserable 'vegetation,' because
you could scarcely call such living,
President Ozora S. Davis, of the Chi- , his sister writes.
cago Theological Seminary, will speak "If we were at least well! But, with
at the "Y" Arcade meeting next Sun- the exception of my little brother, we
day. He has spoken in Ann Arbor all feel weak and ill. Although our
nearly every year for the past six mother is able by some secret means
years and is well known to Michigan to procure some nourishing fats and
students. st'ffs, and our food is made barely
ac'ectablc, still there must be some-
Mr. Davis will be one of the speak- thing wrong in this nourishment, for
ers at the annual Lake Geneva con- we are gradually growing weaker and
ference to which over 50 colleges from we1her. Everybody complains of this.
all over the country send delegates e my husband went to the
each "year. inz- xsfcf ett h
y front 1 often regretted that I came
to my father's house, for the soldiers'
Professors Seak at CanadiBanqr~et wives in Posen get a little better al-
Dr. H. H. Cummings, Dr. O. M. Cope, lowance. But I do not regret it
Prof. F. C. Cole, Dr. R. W. Bunting, now. What should I have done in
and Prof. T. J. MacKavanagh gave Posen where everything is so expen-
short addresses at the Canadian club sive and I should have had to spend
banquet held at the Delta, cafe last gll my time waiting and begging for
evening. A short business meeting a quarter of a pound of butter or the
followed the banquet, at which Pro- like and then go home without any-
fessor MacKavanagh was elected fac- thing? And to have been compelled to
ulty advisor to the society. F *E. (eep this up for weeks and weeks.
Pauling, '17, acted as toastmaster. !'This is the way even the very well-to-
---------do people in Posen have to exist. H1ere
Patronize Michigan Daily Adver. in our little household we can at least
tlzers. **get a. little butter through the great

friendship of my father with the dairy-
man. He goes to the dairy himself so
we do not have to go to bed supper-
less.
"l, my sister, and her baby try to
help ourselves with medicine, but in
spite of our efforts our eyes sink
deeper into our heads every day and
our complexions grow grayer and
grayer, gradually assuming the well-
known "Feldgran," which, you know,
is so fashionable at present.
"We have cards for everything, and
we take care of them like gold pieces
or precious babies, for once gone they
can never be duplicated and we have
to suifer as best we can. In the home
economy we start with a thread, a
needld, and a piece of paper and end-_-
in the prison perhaps. This war will
teach us many things. We shall learn
to be incredulously economical. Every-
thing is watched and saved. These are
terrible times."
In Prof. Zowski's home in Posen
no one is left but the sister who writes
and a 60-year-old father and aged
mother. The last son, a boy of 17, was
recently celled to the colors.
Prof. Zowski's elder brother, after
serving in the heavy field artillery
under General Macken sen through
the entire campaigns in Southern
Poland. Galicia, the Carpathians, and
Servia, has been permitted to return
to Posen to arrange financial matters
with the government.' At the begin-
ning of the war Mr. Zowski's wire

rope and fence factory- lying undelr
the Posen forts was taken. over by the
government.
Mrs. Zowski has received word that
a cousin in the medical corps has
been killed in Lithuania at the eastern
front. Another cousin was killed at
the outset of the war in the eastern
theater. Prof. Zowski's brother-in-
law was recently wounded at Verdun
and is now convalescing.
RIVAL SCHOOLS STAGE BATTLE
11,c i(sjf and~ Illinois to Decide Rela.
tive 3erits of C'orps
Champaign, 111.. April 27.-An ar-
gument between the alumni of Wis-
consin and Illinois universities over
the respective merits of the two
schools' military departments will
probably be settled by a three-days
sham battle between the two :sniver-
sities' military corps. , The battle will
be staged on the border line between
the two states under the direction of
umpires from the war department
some time in May. It will afford an
excellent opportunity for students and
ofli crs to demonstrate their knowl-
edge of fighting, and incidentally to
familiarize themselves with some of
the hardships of war.
Italy A iounces Austrian Repulse
Rome, April 27.--The Italian war
office announces the repulse of Aus-
trians against the newly won Coldilana
and the position captured from the
Austrians on the Isonzo front.

I

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a n
No use puttin
done-Spring is he
need that suit now.
Come in and
d BGrv"6 o lte
come prepared for a
finest lot of garmen
that you'll find any
Fit and work
A.Uc. You can't help but'

jeI

Tday
t.Your

.g off what must be
=re with us again and you

look at t h e 5ciet
, Special $20.00 Suits, and
a surprise. For we have the
ts-from which to choose -
place!
manship guaranteed.
be pleased.

We don't "guarantee" to
give you a $25 Suit for $15-but we do
guarantee to give you the greatest value
in the city for $20, $22.50 and $25.

A }., -. hypo
tl J I
t't kfti :t y
d t ev , .

..m

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