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April 28, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-28

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TJfE DAIII
NEWS OF THE 1 LD AM)
THE CA1US
VOL. XXVI, No. 143.

op.
K r
UA A N

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY THE
NEW YORK SUN

______________ -- - 4' ~

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

P

DR.ANgELL LEAVES
09HE 191W BOOK(S
HULW (OIF ESTATE G$OES TO 111$
TO RELXT1VEm
A..ANGELL NAMED EXECUTIVE
Legaeies Left to OldServitors in
Recognitionoii Mith-
f uness
"I give and bequeath to the Regents
of the University of Mliehigan, in trust
for said university, my set of the 'Re-
vue de Droit International' and also
any other work on international law
which I possess, and which is not
found in any of the libraries of the
university at the time of my decease,
to be deposited by them in the general
library, of the university."
1y 3this clawc in the will of the
late James ]urrill Angell, the Univer-
sity of Michigan comes into the pos-
session of one of the most valuable'
sets on international kiw in exist-
ence.
When Dr. Angell's will was pro-
bated yesterday, it was discovered
that the bulk of estate was left to
three children, Alexis Caswell An-
gell of Detroit, Loi Tho pson Mc-
Laughlin of Chicago, James RowlandE
Angell of Chicago, and their heirs.
"To Catherine Martin and Samuel
jBayliss, I give $200 each in recognition
of long and faithful service," was alsoE
written in the will.
A silver tea set of five pieces mark-
ed "S. S. C." was given to a grand-
(ConthitEd on Page Six)
Berlin Reports
Gain a Ypres
Paris Statement Tell of German ou-
bardmuent, but No Infantry j
Attacks]
Berlin, via bondon, April 27.----"In
the district southwest of Ypres we
subjected the English positions to a
heavy fire, the good effect of which
was noted later by our patrols," reads
an official report today. "South of'
St. Eloi a strong enemy grenade attack
failed because of our fire.t
"In the Neuville sector we succes-
fully exploded numerous mines and inr
a hand grenade attack near Givenchy
we wrested from the enemy a por-<
tion of his trenches and repulsed the
counter attack," the official statement
continues.
FRENCH REPEL ATTACKS
Paris, April 27.-French positions!
before Verdun were bombarded heav-
ily last night. The Germans made not
strong infantry attacks. A few as-t
saults north of Fort Vaux were stop-
ped immediately by French artillery,t
the war office announced this After-
noon. Several German patrols were
encountered north of the Aisne and?
were repulsed in fighting with gren-
ades.

Purdue Engineers
Coming Nay 13
SeV4,11t -lFiyi'eudwi 'er of Junior (lass
o ,Universil y; Plan Trip
to IDetroit
La ayette, Ind., April 27.--More
than 7, members of the junior engi-
neering cla-,s at Purdue will visit the
University of Michigan on Saturday,
lay 13, according to information given
out today. The visit will he for the
purpose o1f inspecting the architectural
and engineering colleges of the Ann
Arbor institution.
The students will also visit a large
number of Detroit factories, but will
remain over in Ann Arbor long enough
to witness the Cornell-Michigan base-
ball game at Ferry Field. They will
spend several days inspecting the vari-
ous plants in Detroit before returning
home to LaFayette.
News of the proposed visit of the
Purdue engineers to Ann Arbor came
as a surprise to engineering college
authorities last night. It is believed
that Prof. 11. E. Riggs, of the engineer-
ing college, who has been lecturing
at Purdue this week, may have per-
suaded the class to visit this univer-
sity.
As a result no plans have as yet
been made for the entertainment of
the visitors while they are in Ann
Arbor.
Smith Addresses
Republican Club
Ontlines Plants of Party; Says Dem.o-
erats llaveii't Lived Up to
Proiniscs
"The present ale ocratic aministra-
tion has broken every plank in its
platform with one exception-that its
nominee would not run for a second
election, and now, boys, it seems as
though it were up to the republican
party to make them live up to this ex-
ception," said State Senator William
TI. Smith, in his talk at the Repub-
lican club smoker held at the Union
last evening.
"I can't say who will be the next
republican presidential nominee, but
I can say that the party will stand
for and put into its platform the fol-
lowing planks: an efficient merchant
marina. an adequate army and navy,
free passage of American ships
through the Panama canal, protection
of sugar and wool industries, and
above all, protection of American citi-
zens in all countries," continued Sen-
ator Smith.
The smoker opened with several se-
lections by the Aloha quartet, after
which a business meeting was called
at which Petpr A. Miller, '17L, was
elected president. Geo. D. Casto, grad.,
vice president,'Leslie W. Lisle, '17L,
secretary, and Harry Gault, '17L,
treasurer. Frank Shaw, '12, city at-
torney of Grand Rapids, was the first
speaker. He outlined the purpose of
the club, which is not to support any
one man, but to get behind the party
and put its program across. Repub-
lican clubs are being formed all over
the country and' are primarily for
young men. e

A11EE 4RANI)ALL, '17.
Who Took) ii Leading Part in the
French Play Last Night
ADELE CRANDALL STRS
IN CERCLE PRODUCTION
Excellent Cast Presents "Miquette
et Sa Mere" at Whitney
Theater
Adele Crandall, '17, as "Miquette",
proved herself the star of last night's
production of the modern French com-
edy, "Miquette et Sa Mere," staged
by the Cercle Francais at the Whit-
ney theater. Speaking with an ease
and precision that betokened an in-
timate aquaiutance with the subtler
mood of the language, she played a
di iicmult role with excellent effect.
The acting of Manuel del Valle,
'1CE, as "Urbain," the timid lover of
Miaulte, drew many rounds of ap-
plause from the audience. Mr. del
Valle was in ,an excellent playing
mood and gave an extraordinarily sym-
pathietic presentation of 1 is part.
MryJohns, '1G, as the trim little
mad who perpetually made pertinent
comments on the conversation, drew
a nimber of laughs. The really hu-
morous character o the play was ex-
cellently portrayed by Leland S.
Thompson, '18, in the aole of "Mon-
chablon," a orn-out comedian.
Lloyd Curby, 17L, as the Marquis,
and Mary Corewll, ' <, as the mother
of "Miquette," were well received.
Other members of the cast deserving
mention are Tom C. Reid, '17, as
"Pierre", Henley Hill, as "Mongre-
bin,"rand Chester Fordney, 'IGE, as
"Lahirel."
GARGOYLE OUT NOON TODAY
Wom1en'M Issue Smres no Prominent
Campus Character
Limited to 1300 copies, it is ex-
pected that the Women's number of
The Gargoyle, which appears on the
camnus and at local bookstores at
noon today, will be exhausted within
a short space of time.
It is said that no student or member
of the faculty who has dared to lift
himself above the mediocrity of the
crowd has been spared the censure of
the ladies. If it be true, as Irving as-
serts, that a woman's tongue is the
only edged tool that grows sharper
with constant use, the reader of The
Gargoyle will pause to speculate upon
the ages of this month's contributors
to the Gargoyle.
In the main, however, the jokes are
bright and snappy, the satire good-
natured, and the drawings clever. It
is refreshing once in a while, it is
said, to "see ourselves as others see
us"-but only once in a while.
Dean Efiinger Speaks in Cleveland
Dean John R. Eflinger, of the literary
college, will speak in Cleveland today
at a banquet to be given by the Union
club. He will reach that city from
Columbus, where he has been attend-
ing the annual Conference of Deans.
It is expected he will return to Ann
Arbor some time tomorrow.

TO HOLD DANCES NEXT
YEAR IN BARBOUR GIM?
I - - _
Comabined (Con mitee to Petition Board
of Re'gents; Cwllsier Lit
honor Systemm
At the meeting of the Student Coun-
cil held last night, it was decided that
next year's university dances will be
held at the Barbour gymnasium. The
matter is in the hands of a combined
committee chosen from members of the
Student Council, the Women's league,
and the Michigan Union. A petition
will be sent to the Board of Regents
requesting the use of the gymnasium
for this purpose. The request will un-
doubtedly be granted.
A committee consisting of Wilson
Shafer, '16, and Ralph Carson, '17,
was appointed to confer with the hon-
orary societies of the literary college
regarding the instituting of the honor
system in that department.1
Ferris Club Members to Hold Dance
M1 embers of the Ferris Institute
club and their friends will hold a
dance Saturday evening at the K. of
P. hall. Dancing will begin at 8:00
o'clock. Tickets are on sale at $1:00.
U.S. Officers To
See Gen. Obregon
Will Confer Withl Mexican Regardingt
Conditions Affecting Punitive
Expedition
El Paso, April 27. -Generals Hught
L. Scott and Frederick Funston wills
arrive in El Paso tomorrow evening,
and General Obregon will arrive in
Juai-ez at 9:00 o'clock tomorrow1
morning, to confer on conditions at-
fecting the American punitive expe-
dition and its activities in Mexico.
The first meeting will take in Jua-
rez when the American generals will
pay their respects to General Obre-t
gon in the customs house, where
ex-President Taft and President Diaz
met in September, 1908, and where the
treaty of peace between Madero and
Diaz was signed in June, 1911, Gen-
eral Obregon will return the call of
the American generals in El Paso, and
there the details of the conference will
be arranged.
RUSSIAN CHOIR GIVES CONCERT
Complimentary Performance Tonight
in Hill Auditorium
When the Russian Cathedral Choir,
which will give a complimentary con-
cert tonight at 8:00 o'clock in Hill
auditorium, arrives in Ann Arbor this1
afternoon, the members will be met at
the station by Professors Alexander
Ziwet and Felix W. Pawlowski.
During the afternoon they will be
shown about the campus and at nightt
11will be entertainedat dinner at the
Allenel Hotel., They will remain in
Ann Arbor until tomorrow morning
at which time they will leave and con-,
tinne their tour to Chicago.
AMERICAN SHOT IN MEXICOt
Arclie Reynolds, Troop Train Chauf-
feur, Reported Rilled
Columbus, April 27.-News was re-
ceived here today of the shooting and1
killing of Archie Reynolds, of El Paso,

a chauffeur with one of the American
'troop trains operating south of here.
Twenty-five coffins have been re-1
ceived at Columbus from the El Paso
quartermaster's depot. It is believed1
these are to be sent down for the
bodies of the Americans killed in ac-
tion since the American army entered
Mexico. All of the bodies have been
interred, but it is understood they are
to be brought to the border.

Will Confer on Submarine

Question;

Berlin Considers Crisis
Past

Expect Communication Will Be
stored; Condition Re-
ported Quiet

Re-

Berlin, via Amsterdam, April 27.-
Ambassador Gerard left tonight for
general army headquarters to confer
3with the Kaiser on the submarine ques-
tion. Germany's reply to President
Wilson's ultimatum is expected to be
framed immediately upon the return
to Berlin tomorrow of the imperial
chancellor, von Bethmann-Hollweg.
He, together with the chief of the Ger-
man navy, Admiral von Holtzendorff,
has had extended conference with the
emperor in army headquarters. Just
when the reply will be despatched to
Washington is not yet decided.
A good deal still depends upon the
conference between the American am-
bassador and the emperor. The jour-
ney to army headquarters takes 20
hours each way. The sending of the
note may therefore be delayed until
the beginning of next week.
Berlin considers the crisis passed.
The last traces of pessimism have been
dispelled, and there prevails through-
out Germany today a certain feeling
of relief, that the danger of a break
with the United States has been def-
initely averted. Press comments have
become more and more optimiistic dtrn-
ing the last few days, and even the
extreme radical organs conceded to-
day that a settlement of the subma-
rime controversy satisfactory to both
governments is possible without loss
of honor or dignity to Germany.
Answer Not Immediate?
Washington, April 27.-The subma-
rine issue remains unchanged, accord-
(Continued on Page Six)
WHAT'S GOING ON

London, April 27.-The declaration
of martial law over the entire island
of Ireland followed the admission in
the commons by Premier Asquith that
the revolt had spread to other parts
of the country, especially in the west.
Hitherto martial law has prevailed
only in the city of Dublin and sur-
rounding districts.
Mr. Asquith said that for obvious
reasons he did not like to name the
other places to which the trouble had
spread, but there had been in the west
and the south, but particularly in the
west, places where there was a devel-
opment of the movement. Very strin-
gent precautions were being taken by
the military authorities to deal with
these places.
Expect Communications Restored
Replying to John Redmond, who said
he had been unable to communicate
with Dublin, Mr. Asquith said he ex-
pected that communication would be
restored by tomorrow. The Irish sit-
nation still presents serious features,
the premier admitted.
In Dublin some fighting is still in
progress in the streets, and the rebels
(Continued on Page Six)
26 Initiated by
Deutscher Verein
Taken Into Organization at Special
Meeting; Ceremonies Followed
by Social Meeting
At a special meeting of Deutscher
Verein held last evening, the follow-
ing 26 persons were initiated into the
society: Hampton H. Irwin, '17; Tony
E. Amtsbuechler, '16; Hermann Henze,
'18; Philip Iloff, '17; E. L. Paul Mal-
lick, '18; Joseph Ginsburg, '18; Philip
F. Leslie, '18; Andrew C. Haigh, '1;
George W. Myers, '18; Ingle B. Whin-
ery, '17; Frederick C. Bolt, '18; Ada
Fitch, '18; Julia Renwick, '17; Ber-
nice Krueger, '17; Gladys Weir,. '17;
Beatrice Smith, '17; Helen Krueger,
'17; Laura Murdock, '18; Ruth Merri-
man, '17; Mildred Hatch, '17; Ella
Bliss, '18; Margaret Avery, '18; Frieda
McLellan, '18; Ada Heath, '18; Adelia
Adams, '17; Emma Zur Muehlen, '17.
At the close of the initiation cere-
monies a short social meeting was
held.
COMEDY CLUB TO ACT MOVIE
Will Produce Play Next Year; To Hold
Campus Scenario Contest
The Comedy club is about to enter
the field of the "movies." At a spe-
cial meeting called yesterday after-
noon plans were projected for the pro-
duction of a moving picture play
of four reels some time next year. A
scenario contest, open to the entire
campus, will be held, and the manu-
scripts submitted will be judged by
members of the rhetoric department.
Full details have not yet been ar-
ranged, but will be announced at a
later date.
Tryouts for membership in the clu
will be held this afternoon from 3:00
to 6:00 o'clock in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. Freshmen are eligible, and
all students possessing any talent for
acting are urged to present themselves
at this time.

MARTIAL LAW ESTABLISHED ALL OVER
IRELAND AS RESULT OF SPREAD OF
REVOLT TO OTHER PARTS OF COUNTRY
NAMES OF PLACES TO WHICH
GERARD LEAVES FORARMY"TROUBLEAT
QUARTERS TO SEE KAISER BAR OF CENSORSHIP RAISED

I

Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Slowly rising temperature.
TODAY
3:00-6:00 o'clock-Tryouts for Com-
edy club, Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, Uni-
versity hall.
7:30 o'clock - Adelphi-Alpha Nu
freshman cup debate, Adelphi rooms,
University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Webster society meets,
Webster rooms.
7:30 o'clock-Mr. E. H. Bailey, of
the General Electric Co., lectures on
"Transformers," room 229, Engineer-
ing building.
8:00 o'clock-St. Nicholas' choir con-
cert, Hill auditorium.
9:00 o'clock-Camp Davis dance,
Union.
9:00 o'clock-Round-Up club dance,
Granger's.
TOMORROW
7:30 o'clock-Regular meeting of
M. S. N. C. club, Newberry hall.
9:00 o'clock - University dance,
Packard academy.
U-NOTICES
2:30 o'clock - Soph engineer base-
ball practice, south Ferry Field.
3:00 o'clock-Election of All-Fresh
track captain, Ferry Field club-house.
3:00 o'clock- J-engineers baseball
practice, south Ferry Field.
3:30 o'clock-Forestry club baseball
practice, south Ferry,Field.
3:30 o'clock - Senior lit baseball
practice, south Ferry Field.

BUSRAH RECEIPTS ARE $2700 1TAG DAY GETS NEARLY $1,4001

Sum Falls Short of Amount Nceded;
Work Will Continue
At a special meeting last night at
10:30 o'clock Busrah campaign work-
ers reportedaa totil oi/oscriptioni of
about $2700. Tid s n ount falls short
by $950 of the $3650 which is needed
for the support of Michigan's alu-, i
doctors in Arabia. In order to miake
np the deticit the conunitteemen will
continue the vall nuntil the =1-
quirdnamountl eas 1ibi collected.
Women workers in the campaign
have colleced, :-12:",, which amount is
nearly one-half of the total canvass.

Dodge Brothers Contribute Largest
Donation of $110
Nearly $1,400 was secured yester-
day in the Tag Day campaign for the
benefit of the Old Ladies' Home. This
result was accomplished by the con-
certed action of 100 university women
ar( 150 women residents of the city.
The largest single contribution was
received from Dodge Brothers of De-
troit, who headed the list with $110.00
A check for $25.00 from Dean Cooley
of the engineering college represented
the largest individual donation made
in the city.

irm U

T- Oh y Goodness
THAT

WOMEN'S

GARC OYLE

EDITI

1sc

ON SALE AT HIGH NOON

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