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April 27, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. ..

TAILORGRAM No. 4

I

TIME SPENT IN CLOTHES: We spend
the greater amount of our time in our
clothes -and consequently we should ex-
ercise care and judgment in the selection
of them. The wide range of selection
possible i n custom tailored clothes per-
mits the exercising of preference to a gra-.
tifying degree. Besides, the satisfaction
and comfort of a perfect fit are assured.

I

Shirts Dress
to I ~Karl Malcolm orSuits
to e for
.Order 604 East Liberty Street Hire
n ,a Has the best set of views up
-Mgow.,auIad down the Huron River
(Lakeland to Ann Arbor) ever
made. Finished in various
sizes and styles. Better call
713 E. University and see them.
- -

HALF OF BUSRAH FUND
PLEDGED IN IO DAYS
Amount Totils 1WO; Women Workers
Will Surpass Record
of Last Year
Busrah campaign workers yesterday
reported a total of $1657.76. About $200
has been pledged, but not reported at
the office. This brings the total amount
collected to about $1850, which repre-
sents the results of the canvassing
Monday and Tuesday. It is more than
one-half of the required total of $3650.
With the work for Wednesday and
hursday nights still to be heard from
the success of the campaign seems as-
sured.
- The total amount so far collected by
the women workers in the campaign
is $769.29. This result forecasts a
large excess over the final total of
$1000 which the women of the Y. W.
C. A. have promised to secure.
An endowment fund of $500 was yes-
terday given to the Busrah project.
The interest on this suni will be ap-
plied annually to the expenses of the
doctors supported at Busrah by Michi-
gan.
There will be a meeting at 10:30 to-
night in Newberry hall of all cam-
paign workers for the purpose of re-
porting the amount of subscriptions
collected Thursday night.
The fourth dinner for committeemen
will be held at 6:30 o'clock tonight in
the Methodist church. Reverend A. W.
Stalker, the Reverend L. D. Barret
and Mr. E. C. Boynton wil speak.

F I F T Y second hand KODAKS in trade toward the LATEST
MODELS. LIBERAL ALLOWANCE on any Kodak that can be
used for RENTAL PURPOSES.
We have just received a new stock of fle very latest models--
Don't accept any OLD MODELSĀ°as there are several neW fea-
tures that do not cost anything extra.

Kodaks

w an'tlo led

FILMS!

I LM!

FI L M S

Buy your films where you are sure of FRESH FILMS.

FINISHING

J C
,I jN
.7
-1
i ic ,

toi
Thirstp-~

i yi

Have your finishing done where you get GUARANTE D RE-
SULTS. I guarantee PERFECT RESULTS or NO CHARGE.
719 North University
We have led, while others foll wed for 11 years, and we in-
tend that our high class workmanship will keep us in the lead
11 more years.

Therona ha fna of quenching the thirst
- Ay -- andtierilciouzgneusscf the thirst
quencher to &ive you double pleasure.
~ \.<But yott don't even b rve to be thirsty
to enjoy Coca-Cola is n treat,what
e er yaar reason for drinhing it.
I ~, ~, ~7 Dm'nn the genuine by full name-
-' nuaaa encourwe substtution.
. , A VTHE COCA-COLA CO.
-~ Atlanta, Ga.
-I ~ _ 6 _
fade
r J
w
Here's the upper class-
man's favorite pipe
bowl of genuine French F
briar, mounted with
sterling silver ring and
solid vulcanite mouth- i
piece. All dealers* 50c-

DEAN VAGHANAPPOVE
ANGELL MEMOBRIAL FUND
Says Two-fold Benefit Is Derived
from Plan to Aid Worthy
Students
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the Med-
ical school, when interviewed yester-
day concerning his opinion on the pro-
posed James Burrill Angell Memorial
fund, expressed his hearty approval of
the proposition.
"To me there seems to be a two-fold
benefit from a plan of this sort; in the
first place it makes the memorial more
of an all-campus affair when entered
into by all classes alike. This cer-
tainly is the right idea.
"In the second place, I can think of
no more worthy and beneficial form
of memorial than putting this fund
into the hands of a permanent commit-
tee to be used at their discretion for
worthy students.
"One of the medical graduating class-
es gave as a memorial .a loan fund
to be usedsexclusively for juniors and
seniors, and by this means several
needy students have been kept in
school when they otherwise would have
been forced to drop out. Personally
I can think of no better memorial that
a graduating class could leave."
JOURNALISTS HEAR WEEKS
Critic Believes University Courses
Valuable to Interviewers T
A. L. Weeks, '10, dramatic critic for
the Detroit News, who yesterday ad-
dressed the classes in journalism on
the subject, "Interviews and Feature
Writing," is responsible for the state-
ment that scarcely any course offered
by the university is valueless in having
a direct bearing upon the training of
an interviewer or feature writer.
"Words and phrases are the newspa-
perman's tools," said the speaker, "and
a study of various authors' styles is
especially valuable. One should read
not only the newspapers, but also the
best of current periodicals and latest
fiction. The styles of Meredith, James,
Conrad, Norris, Bennett, Stevenson,
and Mark Twain are well worth the
study.' But more than a wide ac-
quaintance with literature, the fea-
ture writer should develop his faculty
for observation, take copious notes and
learn to twist a set of facts into a
humorous or pathetic situation without

W.D.C.
"Hand Made"
Pipes, $1.00

\

HAFF-PATTERSON WEDDING HELDL
(Continued from Page One)
apple-green taffeta gowns, and car-
ried lavendar orchids and lilies of the
valley.
The matron of honor of the bridal
party was Mrs. Guy Rondot of De-
troit (formerly Miss Helen Russell of
this city). The bridesmaids were
Miss Madeline Haff, sister of the
groom; Miss Helen Van Dusen, Ger-
mantown, Pa.; Miss Margaret Eaton,
Detroit; Miss Betty Clements, Bay
City; Miss Mabel Whiteley, Baltimore,
Md.; and Miss Elizabeth Talcott, Rock-
ford, Ill. The grooms attendant was
Mr. Kenneth Snyder of Kansas City.
The ushers were George Patterson and
Robert R. Patterson, brothers of the
bridge; Francis W. Crandall, Cleve-
land, Ohio; John Brent, Kansas City;
Eugene McCall, Des Moines, Iowa; and
Stanley Gifford, Detroit.
Mrs. Haff is a member of Sigma
Alpha Iota sorority, and a pledge
member of Collegiate Sorosis. Mr.
Haff is a member of Phi Delta Theta,
Phi Delta Phi, and Michigamua. In
1912 he represented the University at
the Olympic games in Stockholm. At
the present time he is practicing law
in Kansas City.
After the ceremony a reception was
held at the Patterson home, "The Or-
chards" on Hill street. Mr. and Mrs.
Haff left at a late hour for an eastern
trip, after which they. will reside in
Kansas City.
INTEREST IN CLASS TRACK
LACKING; PLAN FOR BIG MEET
Very little interest has been shown
so far this year in class track ath-
letics, despite the fact that "Bones"
Armstrong has announced his willing-
ness to coach any athletes that care
to enter the sport. "Bones" has been
on the field practically a full week
now and only a handful have put in
an appearance for instructions A
plan is on foot for the staging of a
big class meet similar to the one put
on last year, and the coach is de-
sirous that a larger number of can-
didates turn out for preliminary work
before the event is pulled off.

MAJESTI
3 -7 and 8:30 P. M.
High Class Photo-Plays
TODAY
E. K. LINCOLN in
"The Little t Rebel"
FRIDAY
"The Writing on the Wall"w
ALL SEATS 10 cents
GLOVER COMIPLE'I'ES
LIFfE STlAtC1STICS

Shows at 3:oo, 6:30. 8:oo, 9:30

1

h
i
r.
I
WILLIAM D EMUTH & CO., New York

I

Matinees flADofir' Week of
Wed. & Sat. April24
DETROIT
EMILY STEVENS in
"THE UNCHASTENED WOMAN"
A R A D E

(Continued from PIage Five)
than three years.
Infant Mortality High
The enormous waste of infant life
which still goes on, although medical
science has done and is doing much to
arrest it, is shown by the exceeding-
ly high death rates which prevail
among infants under one year of age. Of
100,000 native white boy oabies born
alive, 4,975, or almost five per cent,
die during the first month, and 12,602,
or 12.6 per cent, die within one year.
The girl baby's chance of life is con-
siderably better, the death rate among
native white females during the first
month being 3,894 per 100,000 born
alive, or less than 4 per cent, and dur-
ing the first year 10,460 per 100,000, or
nearly 10.5 per cent.
On its first birthday, however, the
likelihood that a child will die within
the year is only about one-fourth as
great as it was at birth, the death rate
among native whites during the sec-
ond year being 2,841 per 100,000 for
males and' 2,610 per 100,000 for fe-
males. The rate continues to de-
crease until the twelfth year of life-
that is, the period between the eleventh
and twelfth birthdays-during which
it is only. 228 per 100,000 for males
and 198 per 100,000 for females. This,
the figures indicate, is the healthiest
year of life among native whites.
Thereafter there is a continuous in-
crease in the death rate from year to
year.
The distribution of this bulletin on
United States Life Tables is free and
a copy may be secured by applying
to the Director of the Bureau of the
Census.

THUR. - 27 -Edmond Breese in "The
Lure of Heart's Desire," and Drew
Comedy.
Fri,-28-Mme. Olga Petrova in "Play
ing With Fire.",
Sat. -- 29- Victor FHngo's "T es' Mise
alels"-11 parts. Special music. 25Cr
children 15c. "Trip Around the
World." 21..
Orpheum Theatre
The Home of Paramount and
Triangle Photoplays
Matinees, 2:oo, 3:15 Even ing, 6:45, 8:oo
9:15S Saturdays - Holidays Continuous.
Thurs., Fri. -Marguerite Clark in "Out
of the Drifts." Evening, 15c..
Sat.-Bessie Barriscale in "Honor's Al-
tar." Also Mack Swain in a Triangle
Comedy, "His Auto Ruination." Ev-
ening, 15c.
Spring Hats Ready
FLAT BRIMS TILE LATEST
We have a large stock in all the new shapes
and colors. Get your Spring hat of us. We
make hats, shape them to your head and give
you unequalled service.
WE 1O ALL KINDS OF HAT WORK
lIF e: Your last se.son's hat reblocked in-
to the new flat hrie: with a new band, will
please you and save you Sa or $3.
LAl)i FS: XWe rebloek Milans, ,HIemps,
Panain s. etc., into the new Shapes. They
will prase you
FACTORY HAT STORE
N e a r A ',e ne l H o te l 8 Y E . h u r o n S t.
y4' Cox Sons and Vining
CAPS, GOWNS AND HOODS
for all College Degrees
may be ordered now from
Look over the Michigan :Daily Ad-
vertisements. They will interest
a ~noA

LMERICAN TROOPS DEFEAT
VILLISTAS IN TWo CLASHES
(Continued from Page One)
oon and utterly routed by the charg-f
ng cavalrymen.
As Villa himself has recently been
eported alive in western Chihuahua,
here is an inclination to believe that
e may have been in the vicinity of
Le band. The Villistas abandoned
verything but their rifles and horses
nd escaped through the rocky defiles
urther into the mountains, where the
.mericans could not penetrate as

darkness closed in on them. Twenty-
five horses and a quantity of supplies
and ammunition were captured. These,
with the 19 wounded men, were taken
'to Minaca under guard by the Ameri-
can forces.
While the fighting was in progress,
according to army advices, the Villistas
were re-enforced by civilians, who
fired on the American forces from hid-
ing places behind the rocks on the
mountain side. The advices assert
that antagonism to the Americans on
the part of the civilian population in

that particular region is increasing. 'distorting them."

ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL
FOUR DAYS SIX CONCERTS MAY 17, 18, 19, 20

1I

SOLOISTS-Hempel and Hinkle, Sopranos; Braslau and Matzenauer, Contraltos; Kingston and
McCormack, Tenors; Amato and Werrenrath, Baritones; Holmquist, Bass; Kinder, Organist.
CONDUCTORS-Stanley and Stock.
ORGANIZATIONS-The Choral Union, Children's Chorus, The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
CHORAL WORKS--Paradise Lost (Bossi), Children at Bethlehem (Pierne) and Samson and
Delilah (Saint-Saens).
COURSE TICKETS-On sale up to May 6, at $4.oo and $5.00 each. ($i.oo and $2.00 if
cover coupon is exchanged.
SINGLE CONCERT TICKETS-On sale on-and after May 8, at $1.oo and $1 50 each.
Special announcements with programs and complete information will be mailed upon request.
CHARLES A. SINK. Secretary.

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