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April 27, 1916 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-27

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I

THE DAILY
7ie
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND'
THE CAMPUS

" ( x VIII w
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3
1,LiAN

Phones :-Editorli 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE By THE
NEW YORK SUN

I

VOL XXVI. No. 142.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CENTS.

VARSITY ORGES
INTO LEADURING
BIG SIXTH INNING
EVERY MAN ON MICHIGAN TEAM
FACES KALAMAZOO PITCHER
IN EVENTFUL ROUND
CONRAD PITCHES GOOD GAME
Robins Settles Down After First In-
Inning, Holding Fes to Three
Runs; ,Final Sedre 7-3
When Kalamazoo pushed three run-
ners around the circuit right in the
opening inning yesterday afternoon
and Southpaw Conrad started mowing,
down the Michigan batters with easej
and precision, things looked dubious
for the Wolverines.
However, when Michigan scored
twice i the fifth Conrad lost his smile
and his hat and when the sixth frame
closed he didn't even have an alibi.
The final score was seven to three.
Let it be recorded in full justice to
Conrad that when the big boy's right,
college batters aren't going to troublej
him appreciably and in fact they didn't
yesterday as he struck out eleven men
and allowed but six hits. He lost con-
trol though, and Walter Johnson's fast
ball wouldn't beat the fresh lits with
this valuable and indispensable asset
missing.k,
Every man on the Michigan team
went to bat in the eventful sixth. La-
badie walked. Brandell walked. Con-
rad threw one in the general direc-
tion of the grandstand and both men
advanced. Walterhouse walked and
the bases were filled. Caswell smote,
one into the offing,. scoring Brandell
and the captain, while Walterhouse
skipped to third. He was trapped off
the base, but the third baseman be-
came infected with the spirit of the
times and he threw into center field,.
Walterhouse scoring. Caswell had
gone to second on the throwin and
he tried to score but was nailed at
the plate.
Conrad then passed Smith. "Smitty"
stole second and went to third on a
pass ball. Newell struck out. The
rules expressly prescribe that each
batter shall arm himself with a bat
as he steps to the plate and the Michi-
gan batters complied with formalities
so that they wouldn't lose on a tech-
nicality, but clubs were useless. Rob-
ins walked. 'Billy" Neimann was' hit
by a pitched ball, Conrad, deviating
from his custom somewhat, at this
point. "Morry" Dunne mercifully
struck out at this juncture, though,
and the inning closed.
With two on in the next inning, Cas-
well doubled to left and the last two
Michigan runners crossed. the plate.
Joe Robins was a trifle unsteady in
the first and the visitors hung up their
three runs, but he settled down
and after this point he held the
(Continued on Page Three)
WANRINEW MANGER OF
DIASSMES CONTROL
W. R. Atlas, '18, Appointed Assistant
Student Manager; Organization
Appears Saturday
After a spirited rehearsal in Uni-
versity hall last night, Mr. Fred B.

Wahr of the German department, new-
ly elected faculty manager of the Uni-.
versity baud, assumed active control
of the organization.
In a short talk complimenting the
band upon its proficiency, Mr. Wahr
stated that the.same sort of co-opera-
tive work which made the band such a
success under the direction of Mr. S.
J. Hoexter would be continued under
the new administration. The appoint-
ment of Walter R. Atlas, '18, as assist-
ant student manager, was announced
at this time.
President Mathews announced that
all blue overcoats were to be turned
in at Hill auditorium Friday afternoon
between 1:00 and 5:30 o'clock. At
this time the members will receive the
khaki uniforms.
The next appearance of the band
will be at the Case game Saturday.
The members will form in front of
University hall at 2:30 o'clock and

AMERICAN TROOPS
DEFEAT VILLISTAS
IN TWO CLASHES
("ENERAL PE1USHING GIVES OFF1-
(IAL INFOR{MATION IN
DISPATCHES
CIVILIANS SUPPORT BANDITS

VIOLENT FIGNTING CONTINUES IN
DUBLIN DECLARE CIPHER MESSAGES
OF SINN FEIN TO SIMPATHIZERS

Americans Fired on From
Rocks; Antagonism Against
States Increasing

Behind
United

6 Adele Crandall, '17
as lliquette, Und the French poodle
Medor, who appear at the Whitney
in the French play tonight
GIVES PLAYTONIBHT

French A tniosphere Maintained
Adherence to Customs of
Foreign Theaters

by

FINAL REHEARSAL SUCCESSFUL
Three loud raps on the floor of thet
back stage will take the place of thet
usual blare of orchestra music in an-c
nouncing to the audience at the Whit-j
ney theater tonight that the curtainc
is about to be raised on "Miquette etl
Sa Mere," this year's production of thet
Cercle Francais. The absence of an
orchestra is in keeping with the pure-
ly French tone maintained throughout
the play.
The final dress rehearsal was held
yesterday afternoon, and was pro-
nounced successful in every particular.
Adele Crandall, '17, took the leading
part of "Miquette" in a manner that
won the approbation of all those pres-
ent. Marie Cornwell, '17, played the
role of the mother of "Miquette."
Lloyd Curby, '17L, as the "Marquis,"
L. S. Thompson, '18, as "Monchablon",
and Manuel del Valle, '16E, as "Ur-
bain", the lover of Miquette, showed
remarkable skill in the presentation{
of their parts. "Monchablon," a worn-1
out actor, is the humorous character
of the play, his part at times taking
on the nature of a caricature. "Perine,"
a trim little maid, is played by Mary
Johns, '16.
The play is a modern French com-
edy. Act I is laid in a tobacco shop
in a small town near Paris,, while
Act II shows the interior of the house
of the Marquis in the city of Paris.
Following the French custom, six
girl ushers will escort the audience to
their seats. The following will act
in this capacity, Hester Cooper, Mar-
garet Long, Helen Nipps, Helen Bush,
Zena Marsh, and Muriel Tyson. An
additional touch of "local color" is
found in the presence of the French
poodle, "Medor," which takes an active
part in the proceedings.
The seat sale will be continued at
the Whitney after 2:00 o'clock this aft-
ernoon. The curtain will rise prompt-
ly at 8:00 o'clock.
U-NOTICE S
All-pharmic baseball meeting, today,
room 300, Chemistry building, 3:00
o'clock.
All-pharrmic baseball practice, to-
day, 4:15 o'clock, south Ferry Field.
All candidates for senior lit base-
ball team report at 3:00 o'clock for
fresh lit game.
omedy -'Iii h Tryol s Meet Friday
Those persons who intend to enter
the lists for membership in the comedy
club, and who failed to attend the try-
out held Monday, should present them-
selves at Sarah Caswell Angell hall
between 3:00 and 6:00 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon.

El Paso, April 26.News of two
battles between American troops and
Villa bandits in Mexico reached the
border today in official advices from
General Pershing, commanding the'
American forces.
One dispatch gave the brief details
of an engagement on April 20 between
American forces, under Colonel Irwin,
of the Seventh Cavalry, and a band of
Villistas at Cocomarachio, near Duer-
rero. Four Mexicans were wounded
and captured in this battle, the rest
of the band escaping. The sentries of
the Villistas scented the approach of
the Americans and gave warning in+
time to permit most of the bandits to
escape.
The other message told of Colonel
Dodd and his American cavalry de-
tachment meeting and defeating a
band of 250 Villistas in the mountain
of western Chihuahua on April 22. The+
Americans killed six and wounded 19
of the band, losing in return two men
killed and three wounded. The Villis-+
tas were overtaken in the late after-
(Continued on Page Six) 1
Dr. Kamn to Read Paper Before A.C.S.
"Some Relationships Between Ioni-
ization and Structure in Unsaturated
Acids" is the subject of a paper to be
read by Dr. Oliver Kamm, of the chem-
istry department, at the regular meet-
ing of the local branch of the Ameri-
can Chemical society this afternoon.
The society will meet at 4:15 o'clock
in room 151 of the chemistry building.
Poetry Club Will Not Meet Tonight
])ue to the fact that the Cercle Fran-
cais play will be given this evening,
the Poetry club will not meet tonight.
The next regular meeting of the cul
will be a week from this evening.
Dublin Man Calls
Casement Insane
Rev. Prof. henry Browne Says Irish
Nationalist Has Done Much
for British Government
Rev. Professor Henry Browne, pro-
fessor of classics in the University of
IDublin, made ,the following state-
ment here yesterday in regard to Sir
Roger Casement, the Irish Nationalist
who was recently arrested while at-
tempting to land from a German cruis-
er on the Irish coast:
"Sir Roger Casement was in former
years a man of great promise, and he
has rendered many valuable services
to the British government, but his re-
cent actions make it appear to his
friends that he is partly insane."
Continuing, he said, "I do not-think
the Dublin riots will amount to much.
The ordinary Dublin mob is made up
of low elements, easily stirred up, but
lacking in effective leadership and
persistence. The educated and intel-
ligent classes are in . complete sym-
pathy with the government and utter-
ly opposed to mob violence.
Professor Browne is making a tour
of mid-western colleges for the pur-
pose of studying the use of illustrated
material in college teaching. He left
yesterday for New York, from whence
he will return in a short time to Ire-
land.

.h
'MARlE CORNWEILL, '17
whlo has the iole of Mine. (Grandier in
"liqnette (t Sa Mere" at the Whitney
9 -f
TO IF SELL TAGS, FOR
Groips o Weomen Will Canvass City
and Alsi Me Stationed one
Campis
ASK STUIENTS TO CONTRIBUTE
In an effort to raise funds for the
Old Ladies' home, various groups of
women will canvass the city today
selling tags. They will be stationed all
over the campus as well, and are ask-
ing the hearty support of all students
for aid in this project. In addition to
the individual tags, there will be avail-
able banners for automobiles, which
are to be sold for 25 cents each.
The money thus received will be
devoted to the maintenance of the
home of six old ladies., who are abso-
lutely dependent upon this for their,
livelihood.
SECOND CORPS DRILL
HELD ONFERRY FIELD
Rain Fails to Check Evolutions .of
Voluntary Military Or-
ganization
Almost 150 men turned out in the
drizzling rain last night for the second
drill of the university voluntary mili-
tary corps on Ferry Field under the
direction of Major Clyde Wilson of the
engineering faculty and Col: A. C.
Pack of the Michigan National Guard.
Major Wilson announced to the men
that because of the large number of
students who had signed up for drill
practice, he would organize two com-
panies, and the company organization
will be perfected at the meeting which
will be held next Wednesday night at
7:30 o'clock on Ferry Field.
SISLER STARS FOR ST, LOUIS

Haff- Patterson
Wedding Held
Ceremony Takes Place in Saint An-
drew's Church; the Rev. Henry
Tatlock Officiating
The marriage of Miss Gertrude Pat-
terson, daughter of Prof. G. W. Pat-
terson and Mrs. Patterson, to Carrol
Barse Haff, '13-'15L, of Kansas City,,
was solemnized at 8:00 o'clock last
evening at Saint
Andrew's Episco-i
pal church, thes
Rev. Henry Tat-<
lock, D. D., offi-
ciating.
Easter c o 1 o r s,
were used in the
church decora-j
tions and in the,
bridesmaid's cos-j
tumes. The altar
wa s decorated
with smilax, East-
er lilies, and
white candles.
The bride's gown
was white tulle
over white satin,
with pearl embroidery forming the
bodice. She carried a large shower
bouquet of white orchids and lilies
of the vallpy. The bridesmaids wore
(Continued on Page SIx)
WHAT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity: Overcast and continued cool
weather.
TOD)AY
7:00 o'clock A. M. to 6;00 o'clock
P. M.Tag Day for the benefit of the
Old Ladies' home.
3:00 o'clock-Fresh lit baseball prac-
tice, south Ferry Field.
3:30 o'clock--J-engineer baseball
practice, south Ferry Field.
3:30 o'clock-J-lit baseball prac-
tice, south Ferry Field.
4:00 o'clock-J-lit class meeting,
101 Tappan hall.
4:15 o'clock-Public students' reci-
tal, School of Music.
4:15 o'clock-Meeting of the local
branch of the American Chemical so-
ciety, room 151, Chemistry building.
4:30 o'clock-Dr. Mez talks to Inter-
national Polity club, Michigan Union.
5:30 o'clock-Dinner for all Busrah
campaign workers, Methodist church.
6:30 o'clock--Canadian club banquet,
Delta cafe.
7:00 o'clock-Prof. B. L. D'Ooge
speaks on "Carthage" at a meeting
of the Classical club, Alumni Memor-
ial hall.
7:30 o'clock-Republican club smok-
er, Michigan Union.
8:00 o'clock-Cercle Francais play
"Miquette et Sa Mere," Whitney the-
ater.
8:15 o'clock-L. D. Kitchell speaks
on "Glacier National Park," Hill au-
ditorium.
10:30 o'clock-Meeting of all Bus-
rah carppaign workers, Newberry hall.
TOMORROW
3:00-6:00 o'clock-Tryouts for Com-
edy club, Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
7:30 o'clock-Webster society meets,
Webster rooms.
7:30 o'clock=-All-Fresh debate, Adel-
phi rooms.
7:30 o'clock-Mr. E. H. Bailey, o
the General Electric Co., lectures or
"Transformers," room 229, Engineer-
ing building.

9:00 o'clock-Camp Davis dance
Union.

New York, April 26.-A number of
sensational cipher messages were re-
ceived here today by circles sympa-
thizing with the Sinn Fein, the organ-
ization which is leading the rebellion
in Dublin and which has an elaborate
system in this country by which "in-
side news" on the developments in
Ireland, is learned at first hand long
before it becomes known even in Lon-
don. In view of the fact that the de-
velopments of the last 48 hours have
borne out previous cipher messages
of this kind in every detail, it is safe
to assume that they are authentic.
The secret code cablegrams say:
"Violent fighting continues in Dub- -
lin. The greater part of' the city is
held by the rebels."
Another message says that Lord
Wimborne, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland,
the house representative of the crown
in Ireland, his under secretary, Mr.
Nathan, General Friend, commander-
in-chief of the British troops in Ire-
land, and his whole staff, as well as
several hundreds of British soldiers,
are prisoners in the hands of the
rebels. They are held, it is stated,
as hostages for Sir Roger Casement.
The same message declares that up-
risings have broken out in other parts
of Ireland and that the trouble is
spreading through all the provinces.
At no time since the outbreak of the
war has the lid of British censorship
been pressed as tight upon the cable
messages as today.sThe exact status
of affairs in the Irish capitol at the
present moment can only be inferred.
The story of the Sinn Fein rebellion
is being told not by what the London
cables say but by their omission.
"The house can take it from me that
the government has the situation well
in hand," announced Secretary for Ire-
land Birrell in the commons yester-
day. To those familiar with the tactics
of the London press bureauand the
powers that guide 'it this meant that
the rebellion is still in full swing, for
had it been quelled or even controlled
the chief secretary would have said
just that.
Amsterdam, April 26.-The entire
Irish sea and the Atlantic waters to
the west and south of Ireland are
swarming with German submarines
whose sole task is to sink every troop
ship destined for Ireland to quell the
rebellion.
Sir Roger Casement, who has been
arrested and taken to London, is said
to have succeeded in landing several
trains, large amounts of arms and am-
munition and explosives, which were
hurriedly taken into the interior by
Separatist agents who were on the job
when the German vessel arrived.

BRITISH CENSORSHIP

Irish Sea Swarms with German-
Boats to Prevent Arrival of
British Ships

LORD LIEUTENANT OF IRELAN
ANNOUNCED AS PRISONER
]BY IRISH REBELS

U-

6

Ex-Captain Called Best Player
Rowland of the White Sox

byI

George Sisler, the star of the Uni-
versity of Michigan baseball team for
the past three seasons, has been get-
ting a great start this season with
the St. Louis Browns in the American
league.
Manager Rowland of the Chicago
White Sox gave out the following
statement in Detroit, just after his
team'had completed a series against
the St. Louis aggregation.
"Weilman is the only real pitcher
St. Louis has, while George Sisler is
their best ball player." .
A big effort will be made to gel,
Sisler back to Ann Arbor for tbh
alumni game this year if the St. Louis
team is in this section of the country.

f
s,

This explains, in the opinion of ob-
servers here, the fact that theDublin
revolt was at all possible-for the reb-
els, who seemed to be amply provided
with arms and ammunition, contrary to
all expectations.
REPUBLICAN CLUB, HOLDS
SMOKERTHIS EVENING
Aim to Interest Young Men in National
Affairs; Tonight's Meeting First
to Take Place
"Get students interested in politics"
is the slogan of the men wh~o will
meet at the Republican club smoker
at 7:30 o'clock this evening at the
Union.
The Republican party believes that
well-educated young - men should be
interested in national affairs, and to
this end has promoted Republican or-
ganizations in schools and universities
throughout the United States. The
smoker at -the Union tonight will be
the initial attempt to form a Univer-
sity of Michigan Republican club.

TONIGHT--AT 'THE WHITNEY THEATRE-TONIGHT
VENET SA MERE
PRODUCED IN FRENCH BY THE CERCLE FRANCAIS

Seat sale today at Whitney Theater, 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock and at 7:00 o'clock. Curt
Prices: $1.00, 75c, 30c
Cercle Francais Associate Membership Tickets. Exchanged For Fifty Cent Seats

ain at 8:00 o'clock.

1

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