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April 25, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T E DAILY
75
NEWS OF THE WORLD
TIlE CAMPUS

AKA

op.

Phones :-Editorial 2414
Business 860
Tk:E GRAPH SERVICE BY T
NEW YORK SUN

VOl. XXVI. No. 140.
COMMITTEE KEAD
PLANS ADOTIO
(COMBINED SENIOR CLASSES TO
PN AEBRONZE TABLET IN
ESTABLISH PERMANENT FUND
Report of (ommittee to Be Presented
to Each Senior Class forA
Confirmation
A new plan for senior memorials
including the placing of a series of
bronze tablets in the main room of
the university library, and the estab-
lishment of a permanent memorial
fund, to be known as the James Bur-
rill Angell Memorial Fund, was in-
cluded in a resolution drawn up by
a committee composed of the chair-
men of the memorial committees of
the respective senior classes at a
meeting held last evening.
This resolution came as the culmin-
ation of a long period of agitationgfor
some method of leaving class memori-
als whereby they would become of
permanent and lasting benefit to the
university.
The plan as finally, adopted pro-
vides that the combined senior classes
shall each year place in the main
reading room of the new library a
bronze tablet inscribed with the year
of the class, and such other data con-
cerning the class as may be necessary.
Architect Kahn has promised to make
suitable provision in his plans so
that the tablets commemorating each
successive class can be placed ad-
jacent to each other in a prominent
position near the main delivery desk',
in such a manner that they will add
(Contilued on I age Six)
AN EFFINGER TALKS
ON FRENCH PLAY TODAY
Last of Lectures on Verdle Fraincais
Program to Be Vive in
English
Dean John R. Effinger of the literary
college will deliver the last of the lec-
tures on the Cercle Francais program
at 5:00 o'clock this afternoon in Tap-
pan hall. The lecture will be given
in English and the topic will be
"Miquette et Sa Mere," the French
comedy which the members of the Cer-
cle Francais will present Thursday,
April 27, at the Whitney theater. No
,admittance will be charged for the
lecture.
Dean Effinger will discuss the work
of Flers and Caillavet, the famous com-
edy writing team who were the joint
authors of "Miquette et Sa Mere" and
whose long association was recently
brought to a close by the death of the
latter. Some of the other comedies
which they produced will be analyzed
in an effort to bring out the essential
characteristics of theirr work. The
plot of the play to be produced will
be outlined and its relation to the rest
of the plays written by this team will
be pointed out.

Tickets for the play will be on sale
from 2:00 to 5:00 o'clock today and
tomorrow at Wahr 's bookstore. A
limited number of seats were put on
sale in Detroit last week and it is
expected that many people of that city.
will make the trip here to see the play.
Junior .its Meet j hur'sday Afternoon
A meeting of the junior lit class is
called for Thursday afternoon at 4:00
o'clock in room 101 Economicsbuild-
ing, for the purpose of discussing class
dues and to set a day for collection.
Reports will be received from the base-
ball and social committees.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 1916.

PRICE FIVE

t _ _, _

4 PRICE FIVE

Local Convention
Will Be Hot One
First Session of District G. 0. P Gath-
ering Convenes This Moriing
at Court Iouse
With five candidates in the race, the
first session of the district G. O. P.
convention, called for 11:00 o'clock
at the court house this morning for
the purpose of naming two delegates
to the Chicago convention in June,
promises to be a warm one. The re-
sult will determine whether Hughes,
Roosevelt, Ford or Cummins will re-
ceive the support of this Republican
district.
V. E. Van Ameringen, Ann Arbor;
M. W. Hensel, Lewanee; Clarke Bald-
win, Lewanee; Frank Kirby, Monroe;
and W. J. Guteman, Monroe, are the
men' running for the positions. In
addition to the delegates, two alter-
nates will also be chosen.
As yet there has been no unanimity
among party leaders in this section,
and the outcome of the local conven-
tion remains very much in doubt.
RAISE $645 FIRST
DYOFCAMPIGN
llope to Raise $ 365o During First Four'
Days of This Week in Bus-
rah Campaign
DR. HAIRISON TALKS TONIGHT
The first.day's efforts on Michigan's
Busrah campaign yesterday resulted in
a. total contribution of $645 to the fund.
It is hoped that the campaign will
raise $3650 during the first four days
of this week, the subscription of this
sum being necessary to keep Michi-
gan's three alumni doctors at Busrah,
Arabia.
Tonight at 7:00 o'clock Dr. Paul W.
Harrison, returned Arabian mission-
ary, will give a talk to medical stu-
dents at Newberry hall.
Dr. Harrison spoke yesterday morn-
ing to the sophomore, junior and se-
niof medics. explaining Michigan's
work at Busrah, and telling of the
great need in Arabia of medical men.
Last night a dinner was given at the
Methodist church to all workers in
the Busrah campaign. Another din-
ner will be given tonight at the Metho-
dist church for all committeemen.
WESTINGHOUSE MEN STRIKE1
24,000 Employees Walk Out on Pitts- I
burg Coal Company
Pittsburg, April 24.-18,000 employ-
ees of the Westinghouse Electric and
Manufacturing company and 24.000
employees of the Pittsburg Coal com- -
pany are on strike tonight. The for- I
mner ask an eight-hour day and the
latter demand a five per cent increase
voted at the last wage scale.
Strikers and guards clashed at the
Westinghouse electric plant at East
Pittsburg tonight, the first serious
clash between the opposing forces
since the strike began. Hundreds of
men were injured by missiles in the
near battle. Officials of the Westing-
house company renewed their efforts
to have Governor Branbaugh call out
the national guard.
Numerous clashes were recorded
during the day but there was no se-1
rious trouble.

NAVALBILL SHOWS
BIG INCREASE FOR
THE FISCAL YEAR
111IL CAUIRRI ES $2,000,000 FOR AV IA -
TION; 30 SUBMARINES
INCLUDED
PROPOSE TWO NEW DRYDOCKS
Prograim (alls for Two Battleships,
and Two Battle Cruisers
Amonig Increases
Washington, April 24.-The naval
appropriations bill for the fiscal year
framed by a house sub-committee and
submitted today, carried $217,652,174
against $149,656,865 appropriated for
the current year. This is on the basis.
of the navy department's proposed
building prograni for 1917.
That program calls for two battle-
ships, two battle cruisers, three scout
cruisers, fifteen destroyers, thirty sub-
marines, two gunboats, one hospital
ship, and one fuel-oil ship. This would
cost $85,372,127, against $45,653,800 for
this year.
For aviation, the bill carries $2,000,-
000 and, in addition, $85,000 for the
naval advisory committee for aeron-
autics. The naval militia is given $387,-
737 instead of $250,400 as at present.
A number of items for nearly $5,-
000,000 for reserve ammunition are
recorded. A $3,500,000 drydock at
Norfolk and another like it at Phila-
delphia for battleship construction are
proposed by the sub-committee. which
recommended an appropriation of
$500,000 to begin construction at each
place.
German Crisis is
Still Unchanged
Sertr (eLaI.nsing Awaits IWord from i
A mbassador Gerard at1
Berlin
Washington, April 24. - "Neithert
more hopeful nor less hopeful, day we
are sailing along on an even keel."
This was the comment of the statet
department this afternoon in reply to
the question whether latest news from

Plan Exercises
For Dr. Angell
Memorial Services in il l A uditorium
to Precede Dedication of
Newr"Union
Memorial exercises for Doctor An-
gell will be held in Hill auditorium at
2:00 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.
June 28. President Harry B. Hutchins
will deliver the memorial address.
An attempt is being made to secure
Doctor Carl Patton. for many years
Doctor Angell's pastor, to conduct the
religious services. The music will be in
charge of Professor Albert A. Stanley.
Immediately after the meeting in
Hill auditorium, exercises will be held
on the Michigan Union grounds, where
the first sod in preparation for the
new building will be turned and an
appropriate program given in recog-
nition of the building as a testimonial
to Doctor Angell.
Details of the program will be ar-
ranged by the Michigan Union com-
mittee.
OBJECTS TO HOLY
WIEEK FESTIVITIES~
Fr. Burke, of St. Thomas' Church, De-
nounces] Fresh and Other
Dances
TERSM AFFAIRS INSULTING
At a mass meeting on Sunday eve-
ning before 200 Catholic students of
the university, Rev. Fr. Thomas Burke,
of St. Thomas' Catholic church, de-
nounced in strong terms the freshman
and society dances held during Holy
Week and on Good Friday.
"These dances are an insult to the
Christian men and women students on
the University of Michigan campus,"
said Father Burke.
According to rumors which were
prevalent on the campus today, com-
mittees had been appointed at this
meeting to act in co-operation with
Bishop Kelly and Father Burke to
present a resolution to President Har-
ry B. Hutchins, requesting that he for-
bid any social events during Holy
Week, and also to make an appeal to
the board of regents to dismiss all
classes on Good Friday in future years.
Leo Covey, '17L, president of the
Catholic club, when seen late yester-
day said that all these rumors were
absolutely without foundation, as
nothing had been done up to the pres-
ent time in acting on the matter.
Several students who spoke at the
mass meeting Sunday evening criti-
cized severely the practice of profes-
sors in attacking articles of the Roman
Catholic church in their classes.
CAPTURE IRISH SEPARATIST
Take Leader Against English Cause
from German Ship
London, April 24.-The Admiralty to-
night announces that Sir Roger Case-
ment, the Irish Separatist leader, has
been captured from a German ship
which attempted to land arms in Ire-
land and which was sunk. Sir Roger,
formerly a British pensioner, has been
a source .of concern to the British gov-
ernment since a few months after
the declaration of war, when it became1
known that he had gone to Berlin
and was working in the German cause.

MAJOR GENERAL SCOTT TO CONFER
WITH MEXICAN MINISTER OF WAR
REGARDHING MILITARY SITUATII

Separate Peace
is denied Russia

CONFERENCE TO ACQUAI
OBREGON WITH REC]
AMERICAN ACTION'
TROOPS NOT TO LEAVE

INT G]
ENT

L~ernman Officil OrgAn Says Any
Proposals Will Be
Ignored

Such

Berlin, via Amsterdam, April 24.-
"Russia's opportunity to make sep-
arate peace with the central powers
is past."
This is the substance of a state-
ment published today by the govern-
ment official organ, the Nord Deutsche
Allegemeine Zeitung, which says:
"The German authorities will ignore
completely any such proposals. All
these rumors are invented."
John V. Sheehan Passes Away
John V. Sheehan, '87L, died of high
blood pressure at his home in Ann
Arbor last night. Mr. Sheehan was 65
years old and is survived by three
stepsons and a widow. Mrs. Margaret
Slater, of this city, is a sister..
Mr. Sheehan was well known for
his long connection with the book
business, having opened a bookstore
in this city before 1886. In 1888 he
opened a store in Detroit.
WHT'S GOING ON
Weather forecast for Ann Arbor and
vicinity-Fair and coutinued cool.
TODAY
4:00 o'clock-Election of officers of
Phi Alpha Tau, Michigan Union.
5:00 o'clock-Senior Reception com-
mittee meets, 203 Tappan hall.
5:00 o'clock-Dean John R. Effinger
speaks on Cercle Francais program,
Tappan hall.
5:30 o'clock-Dinner for all Busrah
campaign workers at Methodist church.
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, room
401 U-hall.
7:30 o'clock - Dr. John Mez talks
on the International Polity Club,
Michigan Union.
4 7:30 o'clock-Dr. Loomis lectures
on "The Menace of Middle Age," medi-
c1 amphitheater.
7:00 o'clock-Dr. Paul W. Harrison
speaks to medics at Newberry hall.
TOMORROW
4:00 o'clock--A. L. Weeks talks, 202
West Hall.
5:30 o'clock-Dinner for all Busrah
campaign workers at Methodist church.
6:00 o'clock-Tau Beta Pi dinner,
Union.
U-NOTICES
Senior lit baseball practice, south
Ferry Field, 3:00 o'clock.
J-engineer baseball practice, 3:30
o'clock today, South Ferry Field.
J-1it baseball practice, south Ferry
Field, 3:30 o'clock.
Fresh lit baseball practice, south
Ferry Field, 3:00 o'clock.
Pageant rehearsals will be held at
the following hours today:-Court
dance, 7:00 o'clock; folk dance, 8:00
o'clock.

Mexicans on Border Think Americ
Forces Have Completed Their
MIission in Mexico
Washington, April 24.--Gene
Avaro Obregon, minister of war
the defacto government of Mexico,
on his way to the American border
confer with Major General Hugh
Scott, chief of staff of the Americ
army regarding the military situ
tion in Mexico.
Information to this effect was co
veyed this afternoon by Eleseo A
redondo, the Mexican ambassad
designate, to Secretary Lansing in
personal interview at the state d
partment. The visit of the Mexic
ambassador followed one made by hi
earlier in the day, when, on behalf
his government, he inquired as
vhen a'replyrmight be expected
Carranza's formal note 'suggestiu
that the two governments treat<
the subject of withdrawal of tI
American expedition.
Immediately-upon being informed
Carranza's agreement to the confe
ence, Secretary Lansing advised Se
retary of War Baker to send a tel
gram to General Scott at San A
tonio telling him to proceed at on
to El Paso. Secretary Lansing i
formed Mr. Arredondo of the effor
being made by Special Agent Jam
Lynn Rodgers at .Mexico City
bring about a conference before ma
ing a reply.
When he returned to the state d
partment the Mexican ambassador-i
formed Mr. Lansing that he had ju
received from General Carranza
telegram stating that Obregon wou
start for the border at once. It
understood that the conference w
take place either at El Paso or Jua
(Continued on Page Six)
TINKER RESIGNS FROM.
UNIVERSITY Y, M, c,
Failure of Board to Allow Increase
Budget for His Work Cause
of Leaving
Wellington H. Tinker, for the pa
seven years religious work direct
of the Y. M. C. A., has presented b
resignation to the board of truste
of the institution to take effect Se
tember 1 of this year. No success
has as yet been appointed.
Mr. Tinker's resignation is occasio
ed by the fact that he planned a wo
for the association for next ye
which necessitated a greatly i
creased budget, which the board fe
in view of the fact that the associati
is now erecting a new building,
would be unable to undertake.
During the past several months, m
Tinker has received several offers
take up a larger work in the nation
organization of the Young Men's Chri
tian Association, and while up to ti
present time he has accepted none
these offers, it is likely that he w
become associated with that body up<
his departure from this city in Se
tenmber.
While he has had charge of the r
ligious activities of the associatiq
during the entire time of his incun
bency, during the past year he has al
assumed the duties of financial se
retary, taking up the position left Op~
by Carl Smith, who a year ago le
association work to go into busine
in Detroit.

Ambassador Gerard at Berlin had
changed the situation. Secretary Lans-
ing considers the situation unchanged.
The submarine crisis awaits Germany's
reply to President Wilson's last note
demanding that Germany immediately
declare an abandonment of present
methods of submarine warfare.
There is nothing tangible yet to
show what that reply will be or when
it will be forthcoming.
)IIRIAM HUBBARD TO PLAY THE
"QUEEN'S" PART IN PAGEANT
Miriam E. Hubbard, '16, has been
designated to play the role of "Queen
Elizabeth" in the Shakespearean pag-
eant to be given May 7, thus filling
the vacancy in the play left by the
marriage of Phyllis Povah, '16, to A.
Stuart Elton, '17E, in Toledo last
Thursday. The above announcement
was made last night by Professor Her-
bert A. Kenyon, who is in charge of
the production.

l
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THURSDAY--AT THE WHITNEY THEATRE--8:00 O'CLOCK
MIUETEETSAMERE
PRODUCED IN FRENCH BY THE CERCLE FRANCAIS
Seat Sale Today and Tomorrow, Two O'clock e ad Whr's
Prices: $1.00, 75c, 0c
Cerele Francais Associate Membership Tickets Exchanged For Fifty Cent Seats

s _.

SUP P E R
For all Men and Women
Busrail Workers
Methodist Church
5:30 - 6:45
TONIGHT
WED. & THUR.

ATTENTION! MEDICS!

DR. HARRISON, of Arabia, by request has consented to speak again to all Me-
dics who care to hear again

YOU
Can't go to Busrah, t
portion ot your me
CAN

TONIGHT

- NEWBERRY HALL

7 'clock THIS MEETING I OEN
TO MEDICS ONLY E1

ha ai

I

I

The use of this space by the kindness of Wagner & Co., State-Street

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