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April 21, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-21

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THE DAILY
75c
NEWS OF THE WORLD AAD-
THE CAMPUS

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Phones :-Editorial 2114
Business 960
TELEGRAPH SERVICE BY fl
NEW YORK SUN
PRICE FIVE CEN

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-- ----

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VOL. XXVI. No. 137.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRI, 21, 1916.

PRICE FIVE CEN

f_:y

VARSITY DEFEATS
OLIVET IN FIRST
HOME ENCOUNTER
VISITORS ARE SHUT OUT WHILE
WOLVERINES GATHER FIVE
TALLIES
ROBINS' ALLOWS SINGLE HIT
Capt. Labadie, Brandell, and Caswell
Star; Game Stopped at End of
. Eighth Inning'
Michigan opened her home season
auspiciously yesterday afternoon, Joe
Robins applying a beautiful coat of
pure, unadulterated whitewash to the
lads from Olivet, his team-mates mean-
while pushing five runners around the
circuit. t
The game was called at the end of
the eighth inning and the visitors were
permitted to hurry down to catch a
train back to the regions whence they
came. Robins was in danger at no
time during the course of the game,
the Wolverines staking him to a three
run lead at the end of the second, and
from this time on it was smooth sail-
ing. Olivet's lone bingle came in the
final stanza, first baseman J ,hnson
poking a clean single into center field.1
Miller did his best to break up a pos-
sible no-hit affair in the previous
frame, but Brandell was equal to thea
situation and he raced across the out-
field and pulled down a wicked smash
in spectacular style.
Captain Labwlie continued his splen-
did hitting. George smashed out clean
singles on his first two appearances
at the plate, and he secured credit for
another on his bounder down the,
third base line in the fifth when it
eluded Hardt. Brandell was much in
evidence in an offensive way, contrib-
uting a single and double as his por-
tion of the day's work. Caswell hitt
safely twice and handled five chances1
in the field in flawless :tylc'. Tb e be'

"ar ,ayerto
Lecture Tonight
Passion PlIay Actress's Subijeet to 'Be
on "The Message of Ober-
ammergan"

i

score follows:
Michigan- AL. R. H.

Coming at the height of the Lenten
season on Good Friday, the lecture by
Marie Mayer of the Passion play on
"The Message of Oberammergau," at
8:00 o'clock tonight in University hall
will be particularly appropriate and
interesting. Fraulein Mayer speaks
under the auspices of the Oratorical
association.
Marie Mayer was born in Oberam-
mergau and has participated in the
Passion play three times. Though
it was the ambition of Ftau-
lein Mayer's mother to play the part
of Mary she was never chosen, and
it was with delight that she greeted
the announcement of her daughter's
election in 1910.
It is th custom of the Burgomeister
of Oberammergau and a committee of
19 men to watch the people of Ober-
ammergau year after year as they take
part in small religious dramatic pro-
ductions that are -given from time to
time. From the knowledge thus
gained, they make a secret vote from
five to nine months before the per-
formance of the play for the leading
actors in the play. The result is giv-
en to -the town crier who, according
to tradition, goes about the village
announcing the elected players. It
was in this way that Marie Mayer
learned of her choice for the part of
Mary Magdalene.
Wilder Secured
for usrah Talk
Y1 Open Campaign with Speech Sun-
day Evening; Was Chinese
Consul-General
Dr. Amos V. Wilder has been secured
to sreak -next Sunday evening at the
big o; ening meeting df the Busrah
campaign, 'v.hich will take place at
:.00 o'clock i: Hill auditorium. Fletch-
er Brochm an, who was expected to
speak at this meeting, was recently
obliged to cancel all lecture engage-
ments on account of ill health.
Dr. Wilder was formerly consul-gen-
eral at Hong Kong and Shanghai,
China, and is now the financial repre-
sentative of the Yale foreign mission.
He is a brilliant speaker and has had
many ec:periences as a missionary in
foreign countries. His special field
is China but he is also familiar with
the missions of Arabia in which the
students of Michigan are particularly
interested on account of the Michigan
graduates whom they support at Bus-
rah, Arabia, by means of the Busrah
campaign fund.
Plan Services to
Honorr.Angell
University Senate Appoints Commit-..
tee to Arrange Memorial ]
During Commencement
Memorial services in honor of Doc-
tor James B. Angell will be held in
Hill auditorium some time during
Commencement week, according to
action taken by the University SenateI
last night. The actual plans for theI
memorial were turned over to a com-f
mittee which was given power to act.t
The committee will co-operate withc
Superintendent of Public Instructionc
Keeler, with regard to plans already
being formulated by that official for
some concerted action in the form of
exercises in the public schools of the
state next fall. His plans are not yete
ready to be given out, but they wills
iot take the form of a university me-i
morial service. The only service ofI
this nature wil be the one held in Hillr

auditorium during Commencement i
week. c

PHI BETA KAPPA
CONFERS HONOR ON
LITERARY SENIHS
THIRTY-SIX MEN AND WOMIEN
FRONININE. STATES GIVEN
HIGH DISTINCTION
PICK EIGHT FROM ANN ARBOR
Prof. Charles Mills Gayley of the Uni.
versity of California to Deliver
Initiation Address
Phi Beta Kappa elected 36 members
of the 1916 literary class into mem-
bership at its meeting yesterday after-
noon. Of these 23 were men and 13
women. This number constitutes but
a little over four per cent of the senior
class. Last year 38 were chosen, of
whom 17 were men and 21 women.
Those elected into membership are:
Mildred A. Bachers, Port Huron; Ray-
mond Barnard, Detroit; Ruth I. Brown,
Ann Arbor; Ronald Butler, Ann Ar-
bor; Ella M. Campbell, Ann Arbor;
Eber M. Carroll, Ann Arbor; Aaron
A. Chute, Toledo, 0.; Glenn M. Coulter,
Chlittenango, N. Y.; Roy B. Cowin,
Mesick; Harold Cummins, Ann Arbor;
Bernhard Dawson, La Plata, Argen-
tina; Edward B. Gnahn, Burlington;
Martha C. Gray, Detroit; Leon Greene-
baun, Newton, Kan.; Miriam Hubbard,
East Aurora, N. Y.; Harold L. Hum-
phreys, Van Wert, 0.; Helen Hum-
phreys, Van Wert, 0.; Ruth Hutzel.
Ann Arbor; James A. Kerns, Mason;
Margaret S. Kerns, Mason; Abraham
L. Levin, Detroit; Alice C. Lloyd, Ann
Arboi-; Madge F. Mead, Detroit; Rod-
ney A. Parker, Cleveland, 0.; William.
A. Pearl, St. Johns; Nathan E. Pinney,
Ann Arbor; John F. Pobanz, Sebe-j
waing; Elder A. Porter, Greensbury,
Ind.; Stanford Z. Rothschild, Balti-
more, Mo.; Herbert N. Schmitt, Grand
Rapids; Ernest B. Skaggs, Ottawa,
Ill.; Grace Thomasman, Grand Rap-
ids; Ruth C. Trombley, Bay City; Mu-
riel M. Tyson, Flora Dale, Pa.f
The annual banquet and initiationc
will be held May 11, in Sarah Cas-1
well Angell hall. Prof. Charles Mills1
Gayley, of the University of California,1
has been secured to give the initia-
tion address, which will not be open
to the public as last year.
The following officers were elected
at the meeting yesterday afternoon
for the year 1916-17: President, Deanx
J. R. Effinger; secretary and treas-
urer, Prof. J. G. Winter; executive
committee, Prof. Campbell Bonner,v
Prof. J. W. Bradshaw, and Prof. W. i
B. Pillsbury.f

REEVES GIVES OPINION
ON WILSON'S UTIMATUM

Uphlds(IPresident it Stand t'aken:
With reference to the question of
international law involved in Presi-
dent Wilso:! 's ultimatum to Germany,
Professor J. S. Rewevs, of the political
science departmer t, made the follow-
ing statement laus night:
"First: the positioti of the President
should be supported by every Ameri-
can citizen with unswerving loyalty.
His position in international law was
taken a year ago, and the experience
of the past year makes it impregnable.
"His first position was that sub-
marines could not operate against
commerce and observe the rules of
international law.

Niemann, rf......3
Bialosky, 2b4.....
Labadie, lf 4
Brandell, cf ..... 3
Walterhouse, ss .... 3
Caswell ,3b. ..
Dunne, c.. . . 1
Roehm, c..........0
Newell, lb..... 2
Robins, p....... 3

ALL EYES NOW TURNED TOWARD BERLIN
TO SEE EFFECT OF RLSON'S DEMAEND
SEVERANCE OF RELATIONS IMPENDI

1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0

0
0
3
2
1
2
0'
0
1
1

PO. A. E.
0 0"0
1 2 ()
0 0 0'
1 00
1 1 0
2 a 0
7 1 01
1 0 0
10 0 01
1 5 11

"The events of the past year have
shown that a submarine is unable to
distinguish between enemy and neu-
tral merchantmen, between armed and
unarmed merchantmen, and finally,
the submarine is unable to remove the
passengers and crew of a merchant-
man to a place of safety before de-
stroying it.
"As submarines have so frequently
demonstrated their unwillingness or
inability to make these vital distinc-
tions, the President rightly condemns
all submarine activity against com-
merce as in violation of the fundament-
al principles of humanity upon which
international law has always rested
and for which the United States since
its beginning as a nation has always
contested.
"Things have come to such a pass
that any American who goes upon the
high seas in the neighborhood of the
coast of Europe puts himself in jeop-
ardy whatever be the nationality of
the merchant vessel upon which he
sails. Such a situation is obviously
intolerable and, before this war, never
existed, since the United States was a
nation."
Another authority stated that, so
far as he knew, there had been only
one case in which a severance of dip-
lomatic relations had not led'to a dec-
laration of war. The single exception
is extant at present between Italy and
Germany.
That Wilson has taken the correct
stand and "in a very courageous, fine
way," was the opinion of a professor
who wished his name withheld. He
believes that the President has left a
loophole in his ultimatum in which he
could again come to an agreement
with Germany. This loophole is found
in Wilson's wording of the clauses re-
ferring directly to the use of sub-
marines. He added that he was not
at all certain that a break would fol-
low the present crisis.
STAGE DEBATE ON PROHIBIION
Two Thousand People Hear Argument
Decided in Favor of "Drys"
Before a crowd of two thousand
people in Hill auditorium last night,
C. A. Windle, editor of the Iconoclast,
debated Harry G. McCain, secretary of
the Intercollegiate Prohibition asso-
ciation, on the question of prohibition.
The debate, which was left to the de-
cision of the audience, was clearly in
favor of the prohibitionists.
George D. Casto, grad., will repre-
sent Michigan in the State Intercolle-
giate Prohibition contest in Pease au-
ditorium at Ypsilanti at 8:00 o'clock
tonight.
SEND 2,000 MORE TROOPS TO
ASSIST GENERAL PERSHING
El Paso, April 20.-Additional troops
for General Pershing are moving from
border points tonight. Two thousand
nen, it is stated, will leave Columbus
tonight:

Inlander Appears
On Campus Today
Literary Magazine Contains Articles
and Fictlon by ftaculty Men,
and Students
Today, for the first time since The
Painted Window suspended publica-
tion three years ago, a Michigan liter-
ary magazine will appear on the cam-
pus, when the Inlander goes on sale
at noon.
As in the case of the Inlander of
former years, articles both by mem-
bers of the faculty and by students are
given as much space as fiction and
poetry. The articles include "An Ap-
preciation of Dr. Angell," by Prof.
Henry C. Adams, who was most in-
timately associated with Dr. Angell
for over 40 years, and "An Anchor to
Windward," by Professor Fred N.
Scott, telling of the situation which
made the re-establishment of the In-
lander possible. "The Shakespeare
Tercentenary" is an article by Prof.
Louis A. Strauss, and T. Hawley Tap-
ping, '16L, has contributed a student
article which discusses the over-organ-
ization problem at Michigan.
The fiction, which was selected from'
over 25 stories and poems submitted,
consists of a long story by Esther E.
Shaw, grad., a humorous story by Al-
len Shoenfield, '18, timely because of
the Shakespearean atmosphere that
runs through it, annd five short poems,
one of which, entitled "Kin," interprets'
a common experience of all university
students.l
Six pages of editorials, discussing
such campus affairs as the Opera and
senior memorials, give the magazine
a Michigan touch which follows out.
the policy held by the present staff
(Continued on Page Six)

WILSON RECEIVES TELEGRAMS
COMMENDING HIM FOR
STANI LTAKEN
URGE CONGRESS TO AVOID WAF
President Will Be Satisfied Only With
Immediate Abandonment of
Undersea Campaign
BULLETIN.
Washington, April 20.-Secretary of
State Lansing was informed today by
Count von Bernstorff, the German am-
bassador, that an immediate reply by
Germany to the President's demands
was out of the question. It would be
probably ten day or two weeks before
the German government would reply,
Count von Bernstorff said.
Washington, April 20.-With the sev-
erance of diplomatic relations depend-
ent upon Germany's next move, all
eyes in Washington are now turned to-
ward Berlin.
How will the German government
receive President Wilson's demand
that present. methods of submarine
warfare be immediately abandoned?
Will Germany accept the demand, re-
ject it, or offer to compromise with the
President's stand? These are the ques-
tions that have been uppermost in
the mind_ of Washington today.
The fear that the submarine contro-
versy has reached a stage where it
can not be diplomatically adjusted
gathered strength today. President
Wilson received hundreds of telegrams
commending him for his firm stand
in defense of American rights. Mem-
bers of Congress also were :flooded
with telegrams urging them to avoid
war or anything that might lead to
war.
Nothing short of an immediate aban-
donment of Germany's submarine cam-
paign against merchantmen as it has
been conducted since the beginning of
the war will satisfy the President. it
is stated tonight. According to high
authority, the President means that
submarines must give up every eva-
sion of international law when he says
that "present methods" must be ab-
andoned,
Both President Wilson and Secre-
tary Lansing regard it as impossible
for a German submarine to fulfill these
requirements and therefore the Presi-
dent is convinced that abandonment
of Germany's submarine warfare
against merchantmen .is imperative.

Totals .......27 5
Olivet- AB. R.

Hannigan, ss.....
Watson, cf. ..
Cunningham, 2b
M iller, c. ...........
Schlaack, rf......
Johnson, 1b .......-
Myers, if .... .... .
Hardt, 3b ...........
Loomis, p........

'3
3
1
3
3
3
3
2
3

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

10 24 12
H. PO. A.'
0 2 1
0 1 0
0 0 4
0 6 4
0 0 1
1 10 0
0 1 0
0 0 0
0 1 2

1
E.
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0

RUSS DISEMBARK TROOPS
MARSEILLES TO AID IN

AT
WEST

- -_-.-

Totals.. . ...24 0
Summary

1 21 12 21

Two base hits-Brandell. Stolen bases
-Niemann, Cunningham. Sacrifice
hits-Dunne (2). Sacrifice fly-Newell.
Struck out--by Robins, 7; by Loomis,
5. Bases on balls-off Robins, 3; off
Loomis, 1. Hit by pitcher-by Robins,
1 (Cunningham). Time-1:45. Um-
pire-Manningr
NAME SOPH PROM COMITTEES;
CONFERENCE AT UNION TODAY
Committees for the Soph Prom
have been appointed as follows: Ar-
rangements, C. W. Fischer, R. R. Win-
slow, F. W. Hough, W. G. Brownlee,
A. V. Livingston; decorations, E. G.
Dudley, W. V. Casgrain; programs, F.
C. Van Brunt, W. S. Dinwiddie; re-
freshments, J. D. Hibbard, A. M.
Shearer. There will be an important
business meeting of the combined
committees at the Union at 1:15
o'clock this afternoon.

Amsterdam, April 20.-As an im-
mediate result, it is believed, of the
recent allied conference in Paris, a
great flotilla of Russian transports ar-
rived at Marseilles and at noon today
began disembarking a strong force of
Russian troops who are to fight be-
side the French on the western front.
SCOUTS REPORT CAPTURE OF
:3 VILLA MEN AND 7 HORSES
Field Headquarters of the U. S.
Army, near Namiquipa, Mexico, April
20.-Scouts returning to camp tonight
from Santa Mara valley report that
they overtook a band of supporters of
one of Villa's lieutenants. early Sun-
day morning and captured three me
and seven horses.
Prof. Riggs Will Lecture at Purdue
Prof. H. E. Riggs, head of the civil
engineering department, will deliver a
series of five lectures on "public util-
ities" next week at Purdue University.
In return for these lectures a Purdue
man will visit Ann Arbor some time
in May and deliver several lectures
on railway electrification.

WHAT'S GOING ON!
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Warmer, with southeast winds.
TODAY
4:15 o'clock-Prof. J. Russell Smith
speaks on "Tree Crops and Conserva-
tion," Natural Science auditorium.
4:30 o'clock-Mr. Christie of the Ro-
mance Language department speaks
on "Spanish Influences in the Philip-
pine Islands," room 101, south wing.
6:00 o'clock-Bethany Circle ban-
quet, Church of Christ.
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, 401
University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Webster society meets,
Webster hall.
8:00 o'clock-Marie Mayer speaks,
U-hall.
8:00 o'clock-Intercollegiate Social-
istic society meeting, Newberry hall.
8:00 o'clock-Prof. J. Russell Smith
speaks on "The Desert and the Des-
ert's Edge," Natural Science auditor-
ium.
8:00 o'clock-"Frosh Frolic," Ar-
mory.
TOMORROW
3:00 o'clock-Ypsi Normal vs. Michi-
gan, Ferry Field.
9:00 o'clock - Union membership
dance.
U-NOTICES
Fresh lit baseball team practice to-
day, 4:00 o'clock, South Ferry Field.
Senior lit baseball practice today,
Ferry Field, 3:00 o'clock.
Meeting of combined soph prom com-.
mittees at Union, 1:15 o'clock.

HOLD CAMPUS ELECTIONS SOON
Affairs Will Be Left in Hands of Par-
ticipating Organizations
Plans for the second annual Campus
Election Day are rapidly nearing com-
pletion in the hands of the Student'
Council committee which was appoint-
ed to draw them up, according to a
statement made yesterday by W. M.
Shafer, '16, chairman of the commit-
tee. While no definite date has been
set, it seems likely that the elections
will be held on June 1.
Because of the spccess of the plan
which was begun last year, it is be-
lieved that the same organizations
which participated then will again
hold their elections on Campus Elec-
tion Day this year. Among these were
the Michigan Union, the Board in Con-
trol of Student Publications, and the
Athletic association.
As on the first general election day,
direct control of the different elec-
tions will be left to the various organ-
izations taking part, although the Stu-
dent Council will exercise general su-
pervision.

loc

THE

I

LA

DER

"An Appreciation of Dr.
Angell."
"Michigan Over.Organ-
ization."

Oust at Noon Today

"t6Pages'of Live E
ials."

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