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April 20, 1916 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-20

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TFE DAILY
75c
NEWS OF THE WORLD AND
THE CAMPUS

I

CHIGAN

Phonesy:-Editorial 2414
Business 960
TELEGRAPR SERVICE BY T
NEW YORK SUN

_ _

VOL. XXVI. No. 136.

ANN ARBOR, MIChIGAN,

TEURSDAY, APRIL 20, 1aG.

PRICE FIVE CENT

HOME BASEBALL
THIS AFTERNOOF
VARSITY WITH CHANGED BATTIN
ORDER MEETS OLIVET ON
FERRY FIELD AT 4:05
MEN fOR BATTERY UNCERTAI
Olivet Captain to Appear in Pitcher'
Box; Little Known as to
Ability of Visitors
Michigan opens her home basebal
season here this afternoon when th
Varsity stack up against Olivet o
Ferry Field. Play will commence
promptly at 4:05 o'clock.
In an effort to produce a winning
combination, Coach Lundgren ha
been juggling with the Michigan bat
ting order, and he has made one al
teration in the 'actual lineup, sendin
Bialosky in at second base. Biolasky
will follow "Billy" Nieman in th
bAtting order, William being retained
as lead-off man. Captain George La-
badie will follow Bialosk, batting
third, while Brandell will continue
in the clean-up role. Walterhouse fol-
lows the center fielder and Caswell
and Newell appear next in the order
named.
The battery men are a trifle uncer-
tain but the chances favor Robins and
Dunne. If "Morry" isn't used behind
the plate, "Rummy" Roehm will make
his debut in a Michigan baseball uni-
form and will handle the slants of the
Wolverine twirler. The honor of
pitching the opening contest on the
local lot will probably go to Joe
Robins, who proved about as effective
as any one of Lundgren's box-artists
on the southern trip.
Captain Loomis is slated to work for
Olivet with Schlaack and Myers named
as the possible alternates. But little
is known of the visitors here, although
they fell before M. A. C. a few days
ago, the Aggies scoring runs in flocks
and bunches all afternoon. Michigan's
offensivehtactics have been satisfac-
tory for the most part, 'according to
the coach, fielding slips and bad twirl-
ing in spots receiving the bigger part
of the blame for the disastrous jour-
ney into southern climes. Joe Robins
is in good shape for today's battle,
and with some support behind him in
the field, tie Olivet aggregation should
be checked easily.
The visitors will line up as follows:
Hannigan, shortstop; Watson, cen-
ter field; Cunningham, second base;
Miller, catcher; Johnson, right field;
Myers, first base; Werdt, left field;
Hart, third base; Loomis, pitcher.
New Poetry Club
to Meet Tonight

New Inlander to
Appear Friday
Expect Warm Reception for MagiaZin
Edtors State Policy to Be
N____"_
Followed
The indications are that when th
G new Inlander appears at noon Frida
on the campus and at the book store
it will be warmly received by the can
pusAin general.
The old Inlander was founded b
N the classdof '91 and for 16 years hel
a place in the life of the university no
s only for its policy of exhibiting t
best of Michigan's literary talent, bu
for the fact that it served as a Torun
for the discussion of vital problems.
e It is the intention of the pres
e ent editors to carry on this policy a
f ar as is consistent. Certain situation;
are developing constantly which de
mand t is free 'and open discussion
s and some of the typical questions are
- disctssed in the present issue.
There are six pages of pointed edi
torial matter and comments on cam
pus affairs. While no communications
e appear in the issue, they will be wel-
comed for succeeding numbers.
In past years, the Inlander has num-
bered among its staff persons whose
names are now prominent in literary
circles throughout the country, as well
- as many members of the faculty
Among these latter may be mentioned
Dean Effinger, Prof. Louis A. Strauss,
Secretary Shirley Smith, and Wilfred
Shaw, present editor of the Alumnus,
Gym Closes Tonight for Rest of Year
"Doc" May has decreed uncleanliness
for the studes until the time when the
cool waters of the Huron warm up
l enough to become inviting. Because
of alterations the gymnasium will be
closed tonight to all students for the
rest of the year. All those who wish
to get clothes, gym-suits and other
paraphernalia out of the lockers must
do soabsolutely today.
SENIOR ENGINEERS PLAN
BUSY SSEMBLY TODAY
Bursley to Explain Working of Credit
System; ltev.,Mr. Douglas
Will Give Talk
"Business" is the watchword of the
senior engineering class assembly at
8:00 o'clock this morning in room 348
of the engineering building. The tech-
nical men have their senior plans well
under way.
Class dues, amounting to $2.50, are
payable at today's meeting. Prof. Jo-
seph A. Bursley, head of the employ-
ment bureau conducted in connection
with the college, will explain the
working of the employment system.
The engineering exhibit committee,
which has plans well under way for a
monster exhibit on May 18 and 19, will
make a complete report. Rev. Mr. Lloyd
C. Douglass will give a short talk.
Dean, '7oL, Gives
Class Day Talk
Prominent Kansas City Lawyer to
Address Senior Laws on
dJue 26
Oliver H. Dean, '68, '70L, of Kansas
City, will deliver the annual com-
mencement day address before the se-
nior law class on June 26. Mr. Dean

who has engaged in business in Kan-
sas City since his graduation, is one
of the leading lawyers of the Middle
West. A few years ago he was a mem-
ber of a committee chosen to clear up
the docket of the Supreme court of
Missouri.
He is a personal friend of President
Harry B. Hutchins and other men on
the Michigan campus.

GLEE CLUB RETURNS
FROM SUCCESSFUL TRIPi
R~oyally Entertadii by 13Alini aiiWho
ller(iie Clubs With E'.1t hiu-
siast.°e.Welcome
Members of the Glee and Mandolin
clubs arrived in Ann Arbor yester-
day morning after a two-weeks' trip
to the Pacific coast. The trip was a
success financially and musically, the
concerts being well received in each
city vinted.
Concerts were given at Minneapolis,
Great Falls, Helena, Missoula, Spo-
kane, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle and
Chicago. At every stop the clubs were
greeted by loyal Michigan alumni who
entertained the men royally with auto
rides, luncheons, and dances. Among
the most enjoyable "side trips" were#
the auto ride along the Columbia High-
way at Portland and the ride from
Aberdeen to the Pacific coast.t
No concerts were given on the re-
turn trip between Seattle and Chicago.t
Mr. Theodore Harrison, of the SchoolI
of Music, accompanied the clubs as
faculty representative and director.
WET-DRYDEB
SET FOR TONIGHT1

#ILSDN N01flFILS GERMANY TO CHOOSE IMMEDIATELY
8ETwdEEN dNDONMENT OF SUBMARiNE WARFARE AND
SEVERANCE Of DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH U.'

Much Interest in Meeting Which
Opening Gun in State-Wide
Prohibition Campaign

Is

TO FORM "STRONG-A R" SQUAD
."Resolved that prohibition of in-
toxicating liquor for beverage pur-
poses is wrong in pinciple, unchris-
tian in character and powerless as
a remedy for intemperance," will be
the subject of the Wet and Dry Debate
to be staged at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in Hill auditorium, between Harry G.
McCain, university secertary of the
Intercollegiate Prohibition association,
and C. A. Windle, editor of the Icono-
clast, the National Lifuor Dealers'
Association magazine
The debate is attracting state-wide
attention, this being the first wet-dry
debate ever held here and the opening
gun in the campaign for state-wide
prohibition. Prof. H. L. Wilgus of the
Law school will preside, and the deci-
sion will be left to the audience.
W. J. Hoshal, manager of the Wayne
county dry campaign, will attend the
debate and after the close will en-
deavor to interest students in a "strong
arm squad" which he is trying to en-
roll to the number of 200 men to work
at the coming polls. Mr. McCain has
secured 500 men in the state to work
during the coming campaign making
speeches.
The error in this morning's Daily
was caused by the fact that up to
that time Mr. Windle had not answer-
ed the letter of the I. P. A. challeng-
ing him to a debate, and according to
the terms of the agreement laid down
by the I. P. A. he had forfeited the
debate. However, a letter was receiv-
ed, and as both parties were apparent-
ly anxious to have the debate carried
out the contest has been arranged forI
tonight.
NOMINATE ONION OFFICERS
Committee Meets This E ening to
Select Union Candidates
A meeting of the nominating com-
mittee of the Michigan Union to nomi-
nate officers for next year is called
for this evening at the Union. At that
time candidates for the positions of'
president, department vice-presidents,
secretary, and treasurer will be dis-
cussed. Announcement of the list of
candidates will be made next week.-

EXTRIA.C 'S FRO ADDRESS S101
S111, K.011 R ES Mi 1rfJ IN P10-
OUTLINES HISIJRY OF CASE
Hopes Ii Aerial Covernmnent May Meet
Demands in S irit "in Which
They Are Made"
Washington, April 19.-Significant
extracts from President Wilson's ad-
dress before Congress today follow.
The President asked no action what-
ever of Congress. His address simply
showed that he means to sever rela-
tions with Germany, unless that na-
tion immediately ceases its submarine
warfare. Diplomatic history shows
that such a course is almost certain to
be followed by war.
The President's speech in part was:
"A situation has arisen in the for-
eign relations of the country of which
it is my duty to inform you very
frankly."
The President then outlined the his-
tory of the controversy. He said:
"It (the Unitled States) based its
protest on the ground that persons
of neutral nationality and vessels of
neutral ownership would be exposed
to extreme and intolerable risks, and
that no right to close any port of the
high seas against their use or to ex-
pose them to such risks could lawfully
be asserted by any belligerent govern-
ment. The law of nations in these
matters, upon whichtthe United States
government based its protest, is not
of recent origin or founded upon mere-
ly arbitrary principles set up by con-
vention.
"It is based, on the contrary, upon
manifest and imperative principles of
humanity and has long been estab-
lished with the approval and by the
express assent of all the civilized na-
tions."
President Sunniarizes U-Boat Warfare
=The President then detailed the re-
suits of the warfare as practiced by
the German U-boat commanders. Ii
summarizing, he said:
"Tragedy has followed tragedy on
the seas in such fashion, with such at-
tendant circumstances, as to make it
grossly evident that warfare of such
a sort, if warfare it be, cannot be car-
ried on without the most palpable vio-
lation of the dictates alike of right"
and humanity.
"Whatever the disposition and in-
tention of the imperial German gov-
ernment, it has manifestly proved im-
possible for it to keep such methods of
attack upon the commerce of its ene-
mies within the bounds set by either
the reason or the heart of man-
kind. * * *
"Again and again the imperial Ger-
man government has given this gov-
(Continued on Page Six)
ANNUAL ALL-LAW SMOKER WILL
I;E HELD AT UNTON TONIGHT
The annual All-Law smoker will be
eld at the Union at 7:30 o'clock. Ed-
vard S. Rogers of the Chicago bar is
o deliver the principal talk. The Law
acuity and each of the classes will be
epresented by a speaker. Several
nusical numbers will be given. Good
ats and smokes are to be on hand.

S* * * * * * * * * * *
All -Fresh Cap-1)ay Program

'1llte-la:15today.
Phl e-Front of

. Participants--Members of the
1919 class. The Varsity band.
Instructions-Freshmen, wear
your grey caps, form inline in
back of band and march to Ferry
Field, where 700 seats have been
reserved for the Olivet game.
*~ * * * * * * * * * *

*
*
*

T ablet Placed in
Engineering Arch
ledicated to the Memory of the Late
Prof. Dennison of Mechanics
Department
A bronze tablet, dedicated to the
memory of the late Prof. Charles Sim-
eon Dennison, was placed in the arch
in the Engineering building yester-
day, Professor Dennison was for 42
years instructor in stereotomy and me-
chanics in the university. The arch
has been named the Dennison Arch-
way because of the fact that he first
fostered the idea of its construction.
Comedy Club Tryouts on April 28
Tryouts for the Comedy club will
be held April 28. The club plans an
ambitious program for next year. Fur-
ther announcements of the tryout will
appear in later issues of The Daily.
_ _ ___

Washington, April 19. - President
Wilson has served notice on Germany
that it must choose immediately be-
tween abandonment of its present
methods of submarine warfare and
severance of diplomatic relations with
the United States.
The President addressed Congress
.n joint session today and informed
that body of the action he had taken.
The note to Germany carrying the
final word of this government had
been despatched to Berlin hours be-
fore the President took Congress into
his confidence.
It was made public tonight. It con-
tained a scathing general indictment
of Germany's ,ubmarine policy, ac-
companied by the assertion that the
United States has now reached the
point where it must hold' that sub-
marine warfare against the commerce
vessels is incompatible with the right
of neutrals and non-combatants and
the principles of humanity. This is
the wording of the demand that the
President makes upon Germany:
"Unless the imperial government do
not immediately declare and effect an
abandonment of its present methods
of submaine warfare against the pas-
senger and freight carrying vessels,
the government of the United Stated
can have r.o choice but to sever dip-
lomatic relations with the German em-
pire altogether."
MUST S'EYER RELATIONS
All other features of the note are
regarded as of minor importance com-
pared with this demand for it is on
this point that the German government
will act and upon Germany's action de-
pends the immediate seriousness of
the situation.
President Wilson is understood to
mean by this demand that Germany
must give up its submarine campaign
against merchant shipping and com-
iierce carrying vessels altogether. Ref-
erences in his note preceding the de-
mand indicate this. He says that the
use of submarines for the destruction
of an enemy's commerce is of neces-
sity "utterly incompatible" with the
princibles of humanity.

University

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

PRESIDENT ADDRESSES Jj
SESSION OF CONGRESS
YESTERDAY
TEUTON NOTE ALREADY SI
Ultimatum Contains Scathing Critic
of U-Boat Policy and States
America's Stand

WA'. GOING ON

iI
Weather for Ann Arbor and vicin-
ity: Fair with variable winds.
TODAY
8:04) o'clock A. M.--Senior engineer
assembly, room 348, Eng.
_l:00 'o'clock A. M.-Sophomore en-
gineer assembly, room 348, Eng.
1 :0 o'clock A. M.--Junior engi-
neer assembly, room 348, Eng.
3: 1t o'clock--Freshmen meet-in front
of U-hall to march to game.
4:0.i o'clock-Olivet vs. Michigan
baseball game, Ferry Field.
7:00 oclock-At School of Music,
rehearsal for all members of Choral
Union except basses.
7:30 o'clock-Christian Science so-
ciety meets, Newberry ha11.

7:30 oclock - All-Law
Union.

smoker,I

Declared Official University
Prof. Strauss; Officers
Year Elected

Club
for

by

The Poetry club, a new organiza-
tion, will hold its regular weekly meet-
ing in the Cercle Francais rooms to-
night at 7:30 o'clock. The subject
under discussion will be the works of
Anna Hempsted Branch.
The following officers, for the re-
mainder of the school year, have been
elected: President, Muriel Tyson; vice
president, Miriam Hubbard; secretary
and treasurer, Alexander Brade. Any
student in the university who is in-
terested in the study of poetry is
eligible to apply for membership.
Marriage Announcement Corrected
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Supe have an-
nounced the engagement of their
engagement of their daughter, Margar-
et L. Supe, to Ivan A. Kenaga, and not
her marriage as was announced in
yesterday's, issue.

TOMORROW
4:1.i o'clock-Prof. J. Russell Smith
speaks on "Tree Crops and Conserva-
tion," Natural Science auditorium.
6:00 o'clock-Bethany Circle ban-
quet, Church of Christ.
7:00 o'clock-Alpha Nu meets, 401
University hall.
7:30 o'clock-Webster society meets,
Webster hall.
8:00 o'clock-Marie Mayer speaks,
Hill auditorium..
8:00 o'clock-Prof. J. Russell Smith
speaks on "The Desert and the Des-
ert's Edge," Natural Science auditor-
ium.
8:00 o'clock-"Frosh Frolic," Ar-

ABANDON SUBMARINE WARFARE
It, was understood authoritatively
that the President intended to demand
the abandonment of submarine war-
fare against commerce-carrying ves-
sels. But officials admit that the ac-
tual demand made upon Germany is
so worded as to leave this important
point open to two constructions. One
is that Germany must abandon its
submarine campaign against mer-
chantmen altogether; -the other that
Germany must abandon its "present
methods of submarine warfare" in
favor of other methods of submarine
warfare against 'merchantmen which
will satisfy the President.
German diplomats here at once
seized upon the latter construction and
it is regarded as certain that the Presi-
dent's demands will be so interpreted
in Berlin. It leaves*Germany an op-
portunity to reply that the imperial
government will endeavor to con-
form to this demand by a revision of
th'e rules now governing the warning
of passenger ships and merchantmen
and by agreeing adequately to pro-
vide for the safety of. the crews. There
(continued on page Four)

* * * * * * * * *. * * *

*I

*
*x
:Y
*;
e
*N
*

*| mory.
* I

There are many good things
in the world-many are better
than those we have been using.
Some of them are right around
the corner. All they lack is
attention drawn to them-knowl-
edge of them-Advertising.

*
*
*

U-NOTICES
Geography class 25B will take their
first field trip next Saturday morning
under the supervision of Mr. Sauer.
Due to repairs in the gymnasium
which will necessitate its being closed.
for the rest of 'the year, all lockers
must be emptied by this evening.

* * * * * * * * * * *J

r

WET

vs.

DRY

7: _ -
y
f lV..f 7f

Hill
Auditorium

TONIGHT

I

For the Wets: C. A. WINDLE - For the Drys: HARRY G. McCAIN
PROF. H. L. WILGUS, PRESIDING
Both sides of the Liquor Question will be ably defended by these men
ADMISSION FREE

7:30

f s

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