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April 19, 1916 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1916-04-19

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I

VA4 ZE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAIRY

1~AGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY
__________________________________>- _________________________________________________________________________________________________

=-WAI K-OVER:

Buy
Eastman Latest Model Kodaks
Fresh Films of

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LYNDON'S

719 NO, UNIVERSITY AVE.
Where You Buy Kodaks and Films

"Art is lung, Life i,, 8hor,;t"
Sunday Evening Luncheon
Fifty Cents
5:30 P. M. to 8 P. M.
SPECIAL FEATURE
Mandolin Trio Orchestra
Reservations Enable us to give Better Service

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P. S. Did you know that first and
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COACH .PROMI1SS INFIELD
SHAKE-UP FOR OLIVET GAME
(Continued from Page One)
ly" Niemann performed satisfactorily
during the southern jaunt while Bran-
dell is a fixture in center if the in-
field holds out. He will be in the
line-up at any rate, for "Brandy" is
one of the cleverest ball players in
collegiate circles today.
Captain George Labadie was the big
star of the Michigan offense through-
out the southern trip. George hadn't
been breaking any fences before the
team left, but the minute they pulled
stakes for warmer regions he read-
justed his sights and began bombard-
ing the outer walls in every park in
which the Wolverines appeared. In-
cidentally, the natives in one of those
southern ports are still discussing one
of George's catches. The captain
pulled down a line drie somewhere
out in an adjoining county that ap-
parently was booked for a home run
when it left the bat.
Dunne Will Be Behind the Bat
"Morry" Dunne will do the receiv-
ing, and the football man has been
doing duty behind the plate in a high-
ly pleasing and acceptable fashion.
Besides this, "Morry" has been clout-
ing the ball right on the nose and pil-
ing up a batting average that is des-
tined to cause some of Michigan's op-
ponents to "stop, look and listen."
Either "Jo" Robins or Miller will
do the flinging. The chances favor the
first mentioned individual at the pres-
ent moment, although Miller may get
the call tomorrow afternoon when the
bell rings.a
Michigan rooters are undaunted by
the showing on the southern trip and
are planning to turn out en masse to
greet the team tomorrow.
PROHIBITION CAMPAIGN
IS AIMED AT MICIIGAN
(Continued from Page One)
Governor Patterson of Tennessee or
by Charles Stelzle, labor representa-
tive. Washington Gardner will also
speak. In connection with the con-
vention the State Intercollegiate Pro-
hibition Oratorical Contest will be
held Friday, with prizes of $75, $50,
and $25.
An attempt was made to stage a de-
bate between President Dickie of Al-
bion College and C. A. Windle, a
noted speaker and author representing'
the liquor dealers. It' is said Mr.
Windle made a special offer some time
ago to go to Ann Arbor without
charge and debate the issue before the
university students with any speakers
whom the drys might bring on. The
Ann Arbor committee, however, of
which Louis C. Reimann, '16is presi-
dent, reports that after a month of
correspondence by letter and telegram,
Mr. Windle refuses to enter the list.
During May, training classes of pro-
hibition workers under faculty lead-
ership will be formed in all state col-
leges, under Mr. McCain's directions.E
BROCKMA N UNABLE TO
SPEAK AT BUSRA OPENER1
(Continued fromn Page One)
ported that the full quota of thirty
members has already been secured in
each of their several squads. Nu-c
merous meetings are being held in
which leaders are going over the whole1
plan of campaign with their assistants.
Men and women students who aided in
the work last year have been especial-l
ly requested to report to John Knee-
bone, grad., general chairman, who
will be at the "Y" office every day1
for an hour or two after 12:30 o'clock.t
A series of breakfasts and dinnersE
are being prepared for the workerst

during the campaign, which lasts from
Sunday till about Thursday. Numer-
'as committees are formulating for
various branches of the campaign, and
will be announced shortly.
Princeton Adopts War Course
Princeton. N. J., April 18. - The
board of trustees of Princeton Univer-
sity at a meeting here yesterday ap-
proved the incorporation into the cur-
riculum of a course in military train-
ing. Students, faculty and officers had
already approved the course, which
will replace the voluntary one now
given. Credit toward a degree will be
given for completion of the course.
Extra copies of the Angell Memorial
edition may be obtained at the Daily
office. -

Matineea GARRICK w "ak
DETROIT
""MOLLY 0"
ARCADE
Show, at 3:oo, 6:30 8:00, 9:30
wed.-19-Robert warwick in "The Su-
preme Sacrifice."
Thurs,2-Valii Valli and George Le
Guere in "The Turmoil."
- Hamilton Revelle in "The
Half Million Bribe."

I

DAINES & NICKELS

Orpheum Theatre
The Home of Paramount and
Triangle Photoplays.
Matinees, 2:00, 3:15 Evening, 6 8:oo
9:i5 Saturdays- Holidays Continuous
wed.-ig - Dorothy Donnelly in "Ma
dame X."
Thur.-Fri.-20-21-Florence Rodwell in
"He Fell in Love With His Wife."
Sat.-22-Orrin Johnson in "b'Artag-
nan" and ("Fido's Fate." Triangle
Comedy). Eveningx5c.
THE FAMOUS
Cox Sons and Vining
L CAPS, GOWNS AND HOODS
w for all College Degrees
a . ;may be ordered now from
HO0USE IMMIGRATION BILL
REPORTED TO TH1E SENATE
Washington, D. C., April 1.-The
house immigration bill containing the
hard fought literacy test, but with
amendments which are said to meet
President Wilson's objection to the
section excluding political offenders,
was reported to the senate today with
recommendation for passage.
The senate immigration committee
considers the house. provision ex-
empting persons who committed or
advocated purely political offenses, too
broad and amended the section to ex-
clude such if the offense was a felony.
The bill as now recommended would
exclude all aliens over 16 years who
can not read some language, includ-
ing Hebrew or Yiddish, but provides
that any admissable alien may bring
in his father or grandfather, over 55
years old, his wife, his mother, grand-
mother, or his unmarried or widowed
daughter.
Exemption from the literacy test
also would include those seeking to
avoid religious persecution.
AMERICAN PRIVATE M1AY
BE VICTIiI OF BANDITS
San Antonio, April 17.-Messages re-
ceived at army headquarters here to-
day tell of the disappearance of Pri-
vate Charles Eichenberger, of Troop
M, 13th Cavalry, who was reported as
courier in advance of Major Frank
Tompkins' troop to Parral, to ask for
an interview for Major Tompkins with
the military and civil authorities. Mexi-
can reports said this courier had not
arrived and evidently had been way-
laid by bandits. The latest advices,
however, say he not only reached Par-
ral but delivered the message from
Major Tompkins which assured the
American troops that they would bel
well received and get accommodations.
Eichenberger started back to join his
troop and it is believed he was killed
either at Parral or after herpassed the
town limits.

SEVENTEEN
YEARS
EXPERIENCE

ATTENTION! AMATEURS!

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INFANTRY ATTACK. SEt URES
GERMANY 178 PRISONER1
(Continued from Page One)
terday's powerful onrush of the Crown
Prince's infantry on the front between
th, Meuse and Douaumont was shat-
tered. All the stories tell of German
"exhaustion."
The French official reports this aft-
ernoon emphasize that the attack was;
of extremne violence. As for its resultsl
and territory gained, Berlin says that
French positions on a stone quarry
700 yards south of Haudromont farm,
and a ridge of hills northwest of here
were wrested from the defenders. The
French war office, on the other hand,
clims that the enemy only penetrated
a first line trench in the east salient
of the Chauffour wood and that they,
were partly driven out of this position
by a counter-attack.
AUSTRIANS DROP BOMBS ON CITY
Rome, April 1.-Austrian hydro-
planes dropped bombs on Previso,
within 20 miles of Venice, and cnt
other Italian towns in the province of
Venetia, according to an official Ital-
ian statement issued tonight. Thirty
bombs were dropped by the aeroplanes,
ten persons being killed and 20 in-
jured. One of the Austrian air craft
was brought down.
AUSTRIANS ADMIT LOSS
Berlin, April 18.-After one attack
had been repulsed the Italians suc-
ceeded in blasting the top of the Colei
Lana and occupying that Austrian po-
sition, the Austrian war office has an-
nounced. Austrian counter attacks in
the Sugana village drove the Italians
from advanced position, it also re-
ported.

IL .'S EATI STILL UNCON-
FIflWI); lqL PASO BUSINESS
)IA N RECEIVES WORD; CAR-
!R NZA WARNS PERSHING
(Conti*nled fronm Page One)
certain official quarters that the ad-
ministratioli should accept. the word
of the Carranza government if the lat-
ter asserts that Villa is dead. The
White House, however, is insisting
that only the most definite proofs of
the bandit's death backed by the tes-
timony of Americans who are in a
position to identify him would cause
the expedition to be withdrawn.
IOLL WEGFS SPEECH IS PEACE
FEELER, HUNGARIANS TOLD

SPRING IS REALLY HERE!
Robins and Blossoms Are Inaccurate,
but the Fountain, Never'
It has often been said that robin
redbreast brings us the first sign of
spring. But then-there is often win-
ter after :the first robin is seen. Some
maintain that the disappearance of the
frost and the appearance of the tree
buds herald the approach of spring-
time. But in spite of the assurances
of the weather prophets and other
seers Michigan students were not as-
sured that spring was really here un-
til yesterday afternoon when the
drinking fountain opposite the general
library gushed forth for the first time
this season.
Japanese Stage Customs
The profession of an actor in Japan
is not considered a, high one, says Mr.
M. C. Marcus, the author of an inter-
esting work on the Japanese stage,
published by the Iris Publishing com-
pany, and on the average they are not
well paid. Still, there are exceptions.
"When a play is staged it runs at least
for 23 consecutive days. For such a
term a first class man would earn
about $1250, and his annual income
may be estimated at $7500. But it must
not be forgotten that out of this sum
he must provide his own costumes,
which are very expensive.
"The curtain does not rise, as in
this country, but is pulled sideways,
and one can easily see the attendants
who are entrusted with this work. The
orchestra is hidden behind the scenery,
while in a sort of proscenium box the
reciter sits concealed behind a curtain
of thin bamboo. There is no applause
by. clapping hands as in our theatre,
but the public stimulates the actors
by exclamations, in a way that may
be compared to the encouraging nad
cheering of the dancers in Spain. From
the green room a bridge leads to the
platform. This bridge is called Flow-
erpath. The green room is closed by
a drapery, which the actors of small
parts must lift for themselves. When
the performers have some importance
and reputation they have an attend-

The Sign of Satisfaction

will always be assured of bright,
pictures if you have your develop-
ing and finishing done by

u

3

ant for the purpose of lifting this dra-
pery. But the first actors, as well of.
nogu (drama) as of kyogen (comedy)
have the title taiya, which confers the
right to two assistants to hold up the
curtain of the green room for their
entries and exits." -Tit-Bits.
'WENTY RECEIVE CERTIFICATES
American lied Cross Society Accredits
Those Who Passed First Aid Tests
Out of 30 students taking the Febru-
ary examinations in First Aid, 20 were
awarded certificates by the American
National Red Cross society. The cer-
tificates may be had by calling for
them at the health service. The fol-
lowing named students were granted
certificates:
Franklin G. Armstrong, '17E, H. B.
Bassett, '17E, Karl Binz, '18E, C. A.
Breitung, '17E, W. S. Dinwiddie, '18E,
S. H. Emerick, '17E, R. C. Germanson,
'18E, P. C. Hamelf, '18, H. A. Knowl-
son, '18E, T. F. Lockwood, '17, Frank-
lin Loucks, '17E, J. D. Naftel, '18E,
R. C. Parks, '17E, E. C. Schacht, '18E,
A. A. Schupp, '17E, F. A. Sellke, '18E,
G. W. Spender, '17E, G.- A. Stevenson,
'17E, Holland Thompson, '18, H. R.
Waddell, '17E.
Send The Daily home. 75c for the
rest of the year. **

I

M"AJESTIC
2:30 and 8:1
Another Big Success
Arthur
Chatterdon
And HisInvincible Co.
TODAY and TONIGHT
ccT h e Travelling
Salesman"
THURSDAY - Matinee mnd Night
First Time in Ann Arbor
"THE GAMBLERS"

London, April 18.-The Morning
Post's Budapest correspondent sendsl
the following statement by Count Juli-
us Andrass, the former Hungarian
premier, published in Budapest, com-
menting on the recent speech of the
German chancellor, Dr. von Beth-
mann-Hollweg:
"The speech is actually the first
offeial German feeler for peace. The
chancellor defines Germany's attitude
quite distinctly, explaining what he
wants from Russia, what he does not
want from France, what he intends
to do with Belgium, and also his views
of financing the colonies.
P11..\THROPIST DIES IN
EAST; WAS 90 YEARS OLD
Philadelphia, April 17. - Thomas
Wister Brown, whose benefactions to'
ilaverford College, of whQse. board of
managers he had been a member for
53 years,. to the Pe nnsy ivania hospital
and to the Bryn Mawr Hospital ex-
ceeded $650,000, died yesterday at his
iOme in Haverford at the age of 90.
Death was due to his advanced years.
Mr Brown was born in Philadelphia
in I1826.

ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL
FOUR DAYS SIX CONCERTS MAY 17, 18, 19, 20

SOLOISTS-Hempel and Hinkle, Sopranos; Braslau and Matzenauer, Contraltos; Kingston and
McCormack, Tenors; Amato and Werrenrath, Baritones; Holmquist, Bass; Kinder, Organist.
CONDUCTORS-Stanley and Stock.
ORGANIZATIONS-The Choral Union, Children's Chorus, The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
CHORAL WORKS-Paradise Lost (Bossi), Children at Bethlehem (Pierne) and Samson and
Delilah (Saint-Saens).
COURSE TICKETS-On sale up to May 6, at $4.oo and $5.oo each. ($1.oo and $2.00 if
cover coupon is exchanged.
SINGLE CONCERT TICKETS-On sale on and after May 8, at $x.oo and $i.So each.

For quick service, call 2255.
Call 830 for saddle ponies.

VII

I,

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